Phoenix welcomes owner of Trooper Fitness Studio, Prince Brathwaite and certified personal trainer and former competitive bodybuilder, Albert Gonzalez to the podcast. In part one of this two part series, the three preach the importance of having a fitness plan and believing in the numbers. With decades of fitness experience between them, Prince and Albert shed light on the importance of rest and recovery, the difference between training for health, sport or ideal body and what the formula is for each. Learn how to set your fitness goals in episode 67 of In Fighting Shape.

Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.


Of course, you can fight racism in your everyday life, regardless of what you study. Practice mindfulness, awareness, and kindness. Be aware of your own actions and assumptions. Call out racism when you see it. Protest, volunteer, tutor, donate money to good causes and don't support bad ones. You do not need to pursue a career that is directly related to any of the degrees on this list to fight racism; education for itself is a significant step and noble pursuit. But, if you want to do more still, you can make a career out of fighting racism, and the degrees on this list are some of the best for helping you do just that.
Despite all of this, the situation is not so bleak. There is still plenty of work to be done, and there is still hope to be held. We cannot answer the “why” of racism, but we can offer a suggestion on how to fight back: education. Racism is born from ignorance, and education combats ignorance. With that goal in mind, this article highlight the best college and graduate degrees for fighting racism.
Unlike other interval training methods that primarily work to improve endurance of the fast-twitch fibers by using high speeds – requiring you to go as fast as you possibly an in order to activate the fast-twitch fibers – this type of interval instead relies high resistance to accomplish the same thing. The advantage is that because the resistance is higher and the speed is lower, there is generally less risk of injury, less wear and tear on joints, and you can perform them at higher volumes and see better results.
This total-body cardio warm-up takes three minutes—as long as a professional boxing round. Before you get started, practice the boxing stance: Keeping your knees slightly bent and your fists just below your chin, turn your body about forty-five degrees to the right and take a step back with your right foot. (If you’re left-handed, switch sides and put your left foot behind your right.) That’s your starting position.
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.

“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”


^ UFC 40: Vendetta (PPV)|format= requires |url= (help) (Television production). Zuffa (November 22, 2002). Event occurs at 1:00 into Chuck Liddell vs. Renato Sobral. "The evolution of martial arts since 1993, since the UFC came around, martial arts have evolved more than they have in the last 700 years. We know exactly now what works in a real live situation with two warriors fighting. For a long time that was just speculation." —Joe Rogan

If you don’t have access to a heavy bag, or if you need a workout you can do from a hotel room or small space, don’t worry, there’s a solution. In fact, according to Matt Marsden, a fitness instructor at Beacon College in Leesburg, Florida, who has a training and coaching background in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Tae Kwon Do, this type of workout is pretty common for MMA fighters because they travel so frequently and sometimes have to train outside of the typical gym setting.

Much has been said about McGregor’s prowess in the cage, but the UFC featherweight champion claims his competitive edge isn’t just the product of freak talent or gruelling hours spent walloping a heavy bag. Rather, McGregor attributes much of his recent form to movement training – a regimen that champions free-flowing bodily rhythm and a merging of the mental and physical aspects of fighting.

While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.
You will notice that this workout doesn’t change much from week to week. This is for good reason. Strength is a factor in both endurance and flexibility, and strength is developed, in part, by practice. The popular modern trends of highly variable workouts and “muscle confusion” are inefficient ways of exercising. As we move into different phases you will see new exercises, but for now stick to the workout as written.
Try an MMA class to learn more varied techniques. Many local gyms offer MMA classes, and some gyms ("MMA gyms") are centered entirely around martial arts. Trying an MMA class once a week or few weeks can help you learn new techniques and spar with other MMA fighters. Incorporate this into your schedule, especially if you are not training with a coach or other MMA athletes.
What to expect: At the core of most jiu jitsu training is what’s called “rolling,” which is basically wrestling. You’ll either be rolling gi—in which you wear a traditional uniform—or no gi, which usually just involves a pair of shorts and a T-shirt. And while some of it may look like they’re “just laying there,” it’s extremely fatiguing on just about every muscle in the body. Think Pilates in attack mode. It’ll also give you an iron grip.
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.
MMA is officially sanctioned by the government and sports authorities of Taiwan and numerous Taiwanese MMA fighters are currently training and competing at international level, with several in the UFC and other MMA organizations. Many major international MMA fights are held at stadiums in Taiwan every year. Additionally, many martial arts schools and gyms in Taiwan provide professional level MMA training.
The third death on August 11, 2012 involved 30 year old Tyrone Mims, who was making his amateur MMA debut at “Conflict MMA: Fight Night at the Point VI” in South Carolina, making his the second MMA-related death in the state.[184] After being TKO’d in the second round of the fight he became unresponsive and was taken to Medical University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead one hour later. No evidence of brain trauma or concussion was found, however, and the initial autopsy has proved inconclusive. Coroner Rae Wooten explained that his death may likely have been from an irregular heartbeat caused by over exertion; however whether or not his death was a direct result of his fight remains a mystery.[185]

Knowledge defeats ignorance, and philosophy is the area of study for those who love the pursuit of knowledge. Philosophy requires us to ask complex questions, questions whose answers can provide us with a better understanding of our world and ourselves. The knowledge gained in this pursuit, in turn, allows us to better understand issues like racism.


The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 

Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!

Good job thinking this stuff through and trying to stay healthy. Tues and Thursday off will definitely help, but there are other factors to consider… intensity and volume from other sessions, diet, sleep, stress, etc. I would recommend trying that schedule, eep tabs on the intensity and duration of all your sessions and listen to your body. If you are in tune with your body, then you’ll know when you need a breather. You might also want to look into some recovery software, like Omegawave, if you reallly want to dial things in. Hope it helps and please keep us posted on your progress!
Sure, the hype machine was in full effect leading up to this August rematch, but when put on the sport’s biggest stagefor a second time, both Conor McGregor and Nate Diaz stepped up once more. Filled with drama from start to finish, McGregor started fast and Diaz finished strong, but it was “The Notorious” one who emerged victorious via decision, evening the score with Stockton’s finest and setting the stage for what fans hope will be a rubber match.
The Los Angeles Times suggested that Good Fight creators Robert and Michelle King "still had the Good Wife magic" and though Good Wife "had already [run] its course" after seasons 6 and 7 had received mediocre reviews, "they just needed a clean slate" to allow them to continue to mine more stories from that fictional universe.[40] In addition, unlike Good Wife which was centered around "romantic tension" and got bogged down in Alicia Florrick's (Julianne Margulies) love life, Good Fight was considered "refreshing for steering the story the other way" as relationships are "not the plot points that drive the story".[41] Good Fight is regarded as a rare successful example of a TV series spin-off, as other contemporary TV series are either reboots or remakes.[42]
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
A well-documented fight between Golden Gloves boxing champion Joey Hadley and Arkansas Karate Champion David Valovich happened on June 22, 1976 at Memphis Blues Baseball Park. The bout had mixed rules: the karateka was allowed to use his fists, feet and knees, while the boxer could only use his fists. Hadley won the fight via knockout on the first round.[35]
Always remember that the form is crucial, so if technique is compromised, decrease the time per rep or load. When you use TUT for the first time, you will be stunned by the results, which leads to the temptation to used it more often. I have tried different scenarios, and the one that has worked best so far was TUT 2 times each year for big lifts. I have not noticed any significant improvement in strength when I increased the frequency of TUT sessions.
I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.
Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!
The significance of strong investigative journalism and reporting cannot be overlooked. In a time when there is a prevailing sense of skepticism concerning the news media that can be seen on both sides of the political aisle, when the lines between real news and fake news are becoming more and more blurred, and where partisan politics in reporting is standard fare, the need for serious, objective, and critical journalism has rarely been more pertinent.
Mixed martial arts "no holds barred" reference would eventually come to an end with the implementation of specific safety rules and regulations. Despite resistance from politicians and safety regulations, mixed martial arts quickly grew in popularity around the world. Mixed martial arts is now big business! It is now estimated that mixed martial arts events are shown in over 130 countries worldwide. While there are other mixed martial arts promotional companies, non have achieved the incredible success of the UFC. 

One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.
Happy New Years from the In Fighting Shape podcast! Have questions on what your New Year's resolution could be? Comedian and actor, Wil Slyvince rejoins the podcast to talk just that and other topics such as began vegan, hanging out with fellow comedians, and his opinions on what's going on. Be a better you, after listening to podcast episode 71 of In Fighting Shape. 
Cancel, pause, or adjust your order at any time, hassle free. Your credit card will only be charged when your order ships. The discount applied every time is 15% off. Since it would be weird to subscribe to a kettlebell, the subscriptions and subscription discounts are only for things you'll need often, like supplements, foods, and personal care items.
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
When many MMA fighters train, they keep the length of a standard five minute round in mind by doing circuit training.  MMA fighters need to get used to pushing themselves for five minute periods of time just like rounds in fights.  So, they organize their workouts into five minute periods with short rests in between.  For, example, a fighter might jump rope for five minutes, take 30 seconds to rest, shadow box for five minutes, take 30 seconds of rest, and then run on a treadmill for five more minutes.  This example would help a fighter simulate a three-round fight.
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