I trained couple of months with BJJ as a noob last year. Five minutes of grappling does a lot of cardio. Way better than repeatedly running in treadmills. I recommend anyone who works out and lift weights to take interest in MMA. It’s not complete but it’s the closest thing that can *possibly* save you in street fight. Street fights are usually quick, dirty, and intense. You are either in Fight, Flight, or Freeze mode. Your body has to know and react fast enough. Whatever happens do NOT ever end up in freeze mode. When your brain shuts off. Like your body can do a lot of things you thought it was impossible when it is loaded with adrenaline and the feeling of “rush”. Like that teenage guy who lifted a car off to rescue his uncle. I think that was on the news last time.
Although MMA training is excellent, it may not prepare you for self defense. As highlighted in our section on violence, a serious predator will not attack you like a fighter. He'll attempt to take you by surprise. Awareness and prevention should be the first part of self defense, but beyond that you need certain skills, techniques, and the ability to use and defend against weapons, many of which are missing from MMA.

Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
Start developing and specializing your style. There are many different styles of ultimate fighters, from technical boxers to street fighters to mat wrestlers to masters of the kick. What comes most naturally to you? To become a great mixed martial artist, you need to identify your speciality and work to hone that skill into a razor-sharp point that you can use against your opponents.
“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”

The techniques trained in combat sports, from boxing to Brazilian jiu jitsu, often aren't optimal for self defense. Of course there are some exceptions. But in boxing for example, punches are thrown with a closed fist. In self defense, without padded gloves, punches lead to broken hands more often than an unconscious opponent. The addition of eye strikes, groin kicks and slaps, hacks, and other techniques considered "dirty tactics" in sports, should be your primary techniques in real self defense.

The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.

best mma training program

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