“The second important part is the high-intensity element. When boxing, I work either hitting a heavy bag or speed bag for three minutes and then rest for one minute. As a result, my heart rate spikes for a short time and then I rest. Heavy bag work also strengthens my upper body and gives my legs a run for their money. This is my 10-round workout, which I do three days on and one day off.”

Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.

Our signature program, Defensive Options®, is an attentive and purposeful coalescence of Krav Maga, Muay Thai, wrestling, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, boxing, and athletic performance training, culminating in a self-protection program for those interested in living a better and safer life. The curriculum is progressive and dynamic, in the way realistic self-defense was meant to be. While others remain rooted in traditional outdated movements, we continue to test everything we do, in order to make sure what we offer is the best training available.

An English degree means you are adaptable, and are not limited to a single career path. While writing and publishing are direct ways to fight racism, most English majors are not authors. You can become a teacher of literature, writing, or even English as a second language. You can be an advocate, working in charities for underserved populations, and refugee aid programs. You can take your English degree and use it to pursue a law degree, ultimately becoming a civil rights or immigration lawyer.


Training for boxing, mixed martial arts or any other form of fighting takes serious dedication. While practicing the moves specific to your sport is critical for winning a match, fighters must also incorporate a variety of exercises outside the ring to get in top shape. If you have an upcoming fight and have found yourself on a 30-day timeline to prepare, a purposeful regimen can help you make significant improvements in a short timeframe.

You may be attacked by more than one opponent, thus you need to train for that possibility. While it's extremely difficult to fight multiple opponents with sport based rules, it can be done in a no rules environment, especially where weapons are allowed. A hard finger jab to the eye of one attacker, for example, can put him out of commission while you deal with the second. Training methods where you practice blasting through multiple opponents in order to run or get a better position are also a necessity.
Try an MMA class to learn more varied techniques. Many local gyms offer MMA classes, and some gyms ("MMA gyms") are centered entirely around martial arts. Trying an MMA class once a week or few weeks can help you learn new techniques and spar with other MMA fighters. Incorporate this into your schedule, especially if you are not training with a coach or other MMA athletes.
“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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