“I am very happy with my membership and training.  I have been most impressed by the people there and how friendly, helpful and approachable everyone is.  And this goes from the top down and includes instructors as well as other class members.  Having no prior martial arts training, I was a little concerned when my boyfriend convinced me to join that there would be a lot of hard core, militant types in the class that would be intimidating to a small woman like me.  On the contrary, I’ve found everyone to be friendly and approachable and easy to work with.  I am sure that attitude is instilled from the top down (meaning you) because your class members want to emulate you.  So they take cues from you and when they see that you are respectful of everyone and friendly and approachable in your training style, they act the same way.  So please don’t change a thing about that…because I continue to be impressed every class by how wonderful the people are!”


Ethnic Studies programs, essentially, involve the study of the position, representation, experiences and history of non-white groups, many of whom are ethnic minorities in America. This is not to lump each type into a single category, but to only focus on one for the sake of this entry would be overlooking the fact that racism impacts many different groups.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]
The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
Lucca and Maia have a meeting with the FBI. Maia has offered to tell them everything she knows about the ponzi scheme as long as she's granted immunity. Diane and Adrian get wind of a new police brutality case but are surprised when they see the victim. Maia works with the FBI agent to recover memories from her teenage years that may shed light on who is behind the scheme. Diane and Adrian's victim is having a hard time finding sympathy in the justice system given his criminal history. Jay finds evidence to show that the police officer has a history of bad conduct. Maia struggles to remember key moments in her life and possibly the ponzi scheme. Diane and Adrian grow closer as friends and colleagues. Lucca offers guidance as Maia is confronted with uncomfortable truths about her past.

What is it? The term kickboxing has become kind of a blanket term to cover anything that involves punching and kicking, but Muay Thai has a few distinct features. It’s a centuries-old practice that comes, predictably, from Thailand. In addition to fists and feet, it also involves knee and elbow strikes as well as a form of stand-up grappling called clinch.


Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.

Amateur Mixed Martial Arts is the amateur version of the Mixed Martial Arts in which participants engage largely or entirely without remuneration. Under the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF) and World MMA Association (WMMAA), it is practiced within a safe and regulated environment which relies on a fair and objective scoring system and competition procedures similar to those in force in the professional Mixed Martial Arts rules.[153][154] Amateur MMA is practiced with board shorts and with approved protection gear that includes shin protectors, and amateur MMA gloves.
Another common misconception is that boxing is primarily an arm workout. Sure, you’ll shred your tris and bis, but Ortiz says you’ll actually be targeting more of your core and legs. “You’re working your obliques because you’re crunching to the sides and twisting,” he says. “And you’re constantly bending from the hips and bouncing on your toes, which uses your quads, hamstrings, and calves.”
It wasn't until 1993 when mixed martial arts were first introduced to the United States through the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), a mixed martial arts promotional company. The UFC showcased various mixed martial arts athletes fighting each other without weight classes and very few few rules, by boxing standards it was a bloodsport where just about "anything goes". In 1995 United States Senator John McCain called mixed martial arts "human cockfighting," and demanded that MMA be regulated by an athletic commission. Senator McCain's destain for mixed martial arts was well known after his remark, “MMA appeals to the lowest common denominator in our society."
Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]

Carl Reddick returns to the firm and immediately starts criticizing how Adrian and Barbara have been running it. An old friend needs help with an eviction and Diane steps up. Lucca and Colin make plans to meet at an art gallery where they run into an unexpected female. What was supposed to be a simple eviction goes in a completely different direction when Diane shows up at Paul Johnson's door and he makes some shocking allegations. Shortly thereafter, his attorney contacts the firm. Marissa helps Jay investigate the allegations and finally wins him over. Henry tries to talk to Maia, calling her and Amy multiple times and even showing up at the office. The two of them finally get worried and rush off to find him. Lucca joins Colin at a birthday party. Things get complicated fast and Lucca bolts, as she tends to do. Maia is upset when Henry ends up in the hospital and Lenore shows up with Jax. Diane continues to go toe-to-toe with Paul's attorney until Marissa and Jay find the evidence they need to expose him. The firm votes on who should be the managing partner – Carl or Adrian. Lucca makes a decision about her relationship with Colin.
Shoot-boxing, pioneered and popular in Asia, Russia and Brazil, is the most innovative and cutting edge approach to stand up fighting. It is the stand-up portion of MMA, melding Muay Thai kickboxing’s kicks, knees and elbows with precision boxing and high level wrestling and Judo. It combines traditional stand up strikes with takedown defense, dirty boxing and grappling/ striking combinations into a brutally effective, sophisticated and devastating pattern of attacks, that is totally modern and oriented not for a sport, but for combat. We are the only academy in the NYC area specifically specializing in this innovative style.

Let’s take a sledgehammer as an example. Who remembers David Faulkner from The Ultimate Fighter U.S. versus U.K., when he missed the tire and instead hit the concrete and his leg with a sledgehammer? Does it mean that sledgehammer exercises are bad? Not at all, it just means he shouldn't have been doing it, as he had no idea how to use the sledgehammer. Sometimes the exercises that look cool are not the best choices. I am not saying they are not effective, but the problem is that if you can develop the same qualities using much safer options, so why not do that? If as a coach you do decide that smashing a tire with a sledgehammer will give your fighter an edge, make sure he/she knows how to use the tools before they attempt to do so. Your job is to make sure the sessions are effective and safe and they contribute to your athlete becoming a better fighter, which brings us to point number 2. 
During the early 20th century, various mixed-style contests took place throughout Japan, Taiwan, and in the countries of the Four Asian Tigers. In Brazil, there was the sport of Vale Tudo, in which fighters from various styles fought with little to no rules. The Gracie family was known to promote Vale Tudo matches as a way to promote their own Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu style.[4] An early high-profile mixed martial arts bout was Masahiko Kimura vs. Hélio Gracie in 1951, fought between judoka Masahiko Kimura and Brazilian jiu jitsu founder Hélio Gracie in Brazil. In the West, the concept of combining elements of multiple martial arts was popularized by Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do during the late 1960s to early 1970s. A precursor to modern MMA was the 1976 Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki bout, fought between boxer Muhammad Ali and wrestler Antonio Inoki in Japan, where it later inspired the foundation of Pancrase in 1993 and Pride Fighting Championships in 1997.
Unable to fight or train intensely for several years, Alice turned to food for comfort. "I'm an emotional eater, so I would drive down the road, stop at Sonic, and grab a double cheeseburger," she says. "I just ate a lot." Her busy schedule, packed with work, travel, and her kids' activities, made getting back into a healthy lifestyle seem all the more daunting. "I like healthy food, but because of the way my schedule was—with my husband working nights and me off work late and caring for the kids—I needed fast and easy," she remarks. "We ate a lot of fast food. I didn't have the time to prep."
Is it for you? If you have any dreams of competing, this is a good way to go. Many MMA fighters use Muay Thai as the basis for their striking game and amateur kickboxing matches aren’t hard to come by. If you’re already flexible, you’ll probably have an easier time at the start, especially with the kicks. From a self-defense standpoint, it’s in the middle of the pack in terms of practicality.
If you’ve already got a solid base of training and a relatively high level of fitness, you can immediately begin incorporating higher intensity interval methods into your training. Remember though, you always want to begin by using the lowest amount of volume and intensity that produces results and then increase from there. Start by following the Pro Interval Training program below and get ready to see dramatic fitness and conditioning improvements.
Try high-intensity circuit training (HICT). Because much of MMA involves moving quickly and with discipline, HICT can improve your fighting speed while strengthening your muscles. Circuit training involves doing a pattern of exercises in rapid succession for a set number of intervals. You might, for example, include any of the following workouts in your circuit:[3]
Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.

Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.
Diane Lockhart, motivated by the inauguration of Donald Trump, plans for her retirement. Her goddaughter, Maia Rindell, secures an associate position at Diane's firm, having passed the bar examination. Maia accompanies Diane in the latter's final case regarding police brutality, where they meet head-to-head with Adrian Boseman, a name partner of an African-American-owned firm, and Lucca Quinn, Diane's former employee. While the case is still proceeding, Maia's father, Henry Rindell, is arrested for orchestrating an elaborate Ponzi scheme, and due to this, Diane, who is among his investors, finds herself broke and unable to follow through with her retirement, and is also unable to secure or re-secure her job at any firm, with her having already signed an exit agreement with her old firm, and the fact that she invited her colleagues and clients to invest in Henry's fund. To prevent her assets, and consequently, her husband Kurt McVeigh's, from being seized as evidence, she is advised to divorce him, given their separation after the discovery of his affair, but he refuses to file for divorce, still hoping for a reconciliation. Hearing Diane's trouble, Adrian offers her a junior partner position at his firm, which she accepts, and when Maia is fired, in part due to her father's financial scandal, Diane brings her along.
wocyru01.. its pain that I get in the shins.. about 1 inch above and 1 inch in front of the ankle bone... i had it in the past which started at 6 months after running 5 miles everyday. Ive been ok the past 3 weeks, until last night... my shin started hurting and I had to stop running and instead use the bike. my reasearch indicates its either overtraining.. or bad form.. my guess is its the latter as it takes time to develope.. comments??
Pace yourself. During your first couple of classes, you may feel like you have something to prove, but you don't. You might be tempted to go full intensity as soon as you hit the mat or ring, but this will just make you exhausted and unable to train further. Remember to breathe deeply and try to execute the moves and work on your technique rather than exhausting all of your energy.[8]
10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Hi my name is Anthony, or better known around these parts as The MMA Guru. I started training Muay Thai in 2013 and fell in love with many other forms of Martial Arts ever since, so much so that I decided to create this website to share my love of the martial arts. This site is a go-to resource for MMA, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu enthusiasts.
To make sure you’re hitting your target, it’s a good idea to use a heart rate monitor when performing VO2 max intervals. Keep in mind that the popular “220-your age” formula for determining your maximum heart rate is largely inaccurate and a myth– the only real way to determine your max is simply to go as hard as you can until your heart rate stops going up. Make sure to rest at least 2-3 minutes between reps and only start the next rep when you’re ready to perform at 100% again.
The All India Mixed Martial Arts Association is the only MMA Association to have been operating for more than fourteen years in the country, and has organized and promoted many notable events.[227][228][229] It is the first nation in the world to launch SPORT MMA for younger kids those who are keen on learning the game & participate in the point based championship.[230][231]
In 1951, a high-profile mixed martial arts bout was Masahiko Kimura vs. Hélio Gracie, which was fought between judoka Masahiko Kimura and Brazilian jiu jitsu founder Hélio Gracie in Brazil. Kimura defeated Gracie using a gyaku-ude-garami armlock, which later became known as the "Kimura" in Brazilian jiu jitsu.[24] In 1963, a catch wrestler and judoka "Judo" Gene Lebell fought professional boxer Milo Savage in a no-holds-barred match. Lebell won by Harai Goshi to rear naked choke, leaving Savage unconscious. This was the first televised bout of mixed-style fighting in North America. The hometown crowd was so enraged that they began to boo and throw chairs at Lebell.[25]
If Le Corre’s description of ancient warriors jumping and climbing walls seems incongruous with traditional combat training, the regimen appears even funkier in present day. Video of McGregor training before his fight with Aldo appeared online last year. It shows a montage of the fighter performing drills – presumably cobbled together in a random sequence – that might seem culled from the B-reel of a Bruce Lee movie.
“If you are a small man or are a woman and want the skills to fight off an attacker, my testimonial is a must read. I’m 5’7″ and weigh 140 pounds. I’m a small guy. In fact, my frame is very similar in size or smaller than many women. The beauty of MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is that size doesn’t matter. I can defend myself in stand up punching and kicking situations, and take the fight to my opponent if needed. I now know that Judo throws and takedowns are easier for a shorter person because your center of gravity is lower and you can get under your opponent easier. If things go to the ground, I can submit or choke out an opponent who has 100+ pound weight advantage. Once on the ground everything equals out, and with training, you have a huge advantage. Your opponent will be a fish out of water. How can this be? MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) aren’t dependent on athleticism, strength or fitness. You use your brain, not brawn, and the laws of physics (leverage) to defeat your opponent.”

I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
The kids Jiu Jitsu classes at Team Quest in Portland are structured to allow kids of all experience and skill levels to learn the martial art of BJJ (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu). Separated by age and size in the class allows the kids to train with other children who can help push them to succeed as well as learn how to defend themselves from opponents with the use of the gi. The kids Jiu Jitsu classes require a gi (kimono) to ensure the use of proper technique and give your child a realistic feel of wrestling in real life situations as we typically wear clothing while in self defense situations.
Whether you intend to become a newspaper journalist, publishing in print and on the web, or a television reporter, or even an investigative documentarian, a degree in journalism can give you the mix of practical skills and critical knowledge necessary for spreading awareness of racial issues. A strong journalist is not satisfied with merely reporting surface issues, but wants deeper answers, and will do the necessary digging to get them.

Any recommendations for a twenty five year old female who is barely over five feet tall and ninety five pounds? I’ve gotten up to three hours of kundalini a day and 100 pushups straight, as well as two years wushu, but I’ve been in some seriously bad fights and had the shit kicked out of me. I really don’t want to keep being so damn small and unable to defend myself.
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.

I'd started putting together a weight routine to go with my MMA training and I'm surprised how similar it is to this. What I was going for was based more on stronglifts / starting strength however, If you woulnd't mind giving opinions on it. It was one of the AxBxAxx style routines, with two of the x being martial arts training. So week 1 would be AmBmAxx week 2 BmAmBxx
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.

The best MMA training programs cover a range of skills. Gone are the days where one-dimensional grapplers submitted strikers with no knowledge of the ground game. While fighters will normally favor one area of fighting, a well-rounded fighter needs to be able to survive in every area of the game or face being overwhelmed outside his comfort zone. Furthermore, he will need to be able to put the separate aspects of the game together in actual MMA sessions.

If you want to learn MMA in Denver and the Front Range, the Easton academies should be your first stop. There’s a reason the pros choose us! We offer the best martial arts training in the area, with experienced, professional instructors who will teach you how to dominate in the cage. Easton MMA is a well-rounded program, which will give you a solid range of techniques.


One major area of focus for MMA fighters is their core.  Core training is based around strengthening abdominal muscles and is key to MMA athletes.  Building the abdomen helps in taking punches. Successful core training could include exercises like sit-ups, crunches, and leg raises.  Many athletes work with additional weights and medicine balls in order to accelerate their strength development.

Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.


That’s why Silva swears by neck ups. To perform the move, grab a weight bench and lay on your back so your head is hanging off of it. Then, use your neck to raise your head up until your chin touches his chest, pausing to squeeze the muscles. Then, lay face down and repeat for another 25 reps, this time lifting your neck up as high as possible. Lay on your left shoulder and repeat, then for your right shoulder.

If you prefer to work with adults, there are many options. For example, there is much work to be done in the area of reintegrating ex-convicts into society, by helping them get career training and employment, maintain their parole terms, remain sober, and avoid recidivism. Racism in housing is still a major issue, and you can fight racism by helping people secure affordable housing.

I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a complete fighting system that teaches you how to control and subdue your opponent. You learn not only how to immobilize an opponent effectively so they can’t attack you, but also how to defeat them humanely without having to seriously hurt them. It’s the only proven style where a smaller person can immobilize and defeat a stronger, larger attacker.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training. 

If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
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