Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.
If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
One of the main keys to performing reactive power intervals correctly is selecting the right exercises for the method. Exercises that are commonly used for plyometrics like hurdle, box jumps or broad jumps, medicine ball throws into a wall, explosive push-ups and pull-ups, etc. are the most appropriate for this form of interval. The primary requirement is that the working muscles are actively stretched under load and then rapidly recoiled to produce maximum force.

Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.


You know what, I was reading through this article and was like why this is pretty good for a blog but for you to be sexist towards women fighters, go to hell and be a real man. OH, why look at the big man talking shit about females on a blog. First of all of course a man is stronger than a woman that obvious but for you to personally tell a woman to get pepper spray makes you incompetent and ill make sure i dont visit this sexist ass site anymore.
As boxing continues to evolve in mixed martial arts (MMA), so do the training methods employed. Absent from many MMA gyms is one of the most fundamental techniques used in boxing for more than a century–shadow boxing. If you are a fighter and you want to bring your boxing to the next level quickly, you must consistently incorporate shadow boxing into your training regimen. Below we will provide the rationale along with some basic strategies for getting the most out of your shadow boxing. If you shadow box regularly under the watchful eye of an expert boxing coach, you may want to stop reading here. If not, keep reading!

Mixed martial arts "no holds barred" reference would eventually come to an end with the implementation of specific safety rules and regulations. Despite resistance from politicians and safety regulations, mixed martial arts quickly grew in popularity around the world. Mixed martial arts is now big business! It is now estimated that mixed martial arts events are shown in over 130 countries worldwide. While there are other mixed martial arts promotional companies, non have achieved the incredible success of the UFC.
Regarding Vo2 max training, how is it possible to go all out for 3min. I’m a minute in and exhausted. I’ve either used a 15lbs medicine ball slam exercise or a 50lbs medicine ball pick up, squat, overhead press movement for 1min, then rest 1min and repeat for 5 sets. I’m done after that. Is my workload too heavy, am I not resting enough between sets? I bought the 8weeks Out book but am still confused on this interval scheme.
Robert King: No. Originally we thought the year would be about optimism and trying to find a way out of the thicket of politics. But when we all discussed it, we realized that wouldn't be true to Diane's character. Diane, a diehard liberal, would be going crazy this year.  So we decided to make this season not so much about Trump as Diane's reaction to Trump. It's probably our most first-person season, because you're not sure if what you're seeing is reality or Diane's micro-dosing (drug use) reaction to reality. 
Despite our competition success, 90% of our students are actually just looking to get in the best shape of their life and learn effective self defense. The fact that we treat our beginners so professionally and with the highest level of patience is what has allowed us to become so successful. Our famous competition pedigree is a result of how well we tailor our classes for all ages and levels.
Tuttle Publishing has produced many excellent martial arts books in the past and I'd like to add this book to my list. As the title says it is primarily covers "Mixed Martial Arts Fighting Techniques" plus mentions some self- defense techniques not allowed in MMA contests for use in a bad street or life threatening situations. However, I view the entire book as a self- defense book because what is used for MMA can also be used in most self- defense situations!!!
Try high-intensity circuit training (HICT). Because much of MMA involves moving quickly and with discipline, HICT can improve your fighting speed while strengthening your muscles. Circuit training involves doing a pattern of exercises in rapid succession for a set number of intervals. You might, for example, include any of the following workouts in your circuit:[3]
No-holds-barred fighting reportedly took place in the late 1880s when wrestlers representing style of Catch wrestling and many others met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe. In the USA, the first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight world boxing champion, entered the ring with his trainer, wrestling champion William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. In September 1901, Frank "Paddy" Slavin, who had been a contender for Sullivan's boxing title, knocked out future world wrestling champion Frank Gotch in Dawson City, Canada.[17] The judo-practitioner Ren-nierand, who gained fame after defeating George Dubois, would fight again in another similar contest, which he lost to Ukrainian Catch wrestler Ivan Poddubny.[16] 

6) Training MMA fulfills mans need for physical expression aka violence. We don't want violence in our daily lives but we still yearn for physicality. We all get pumped up seeing fights in movies or TV or when we hear about someone who was accosted by thugs and kicked the crap out of the them. Training MMA is a perfect middle ground. You can train (or fight) in controlled areas and release aggression with no threat of repercussions, jail time, murder etc..
There are still some strength and conditioning coaches out there who train the fighters as if the gym, not the cage, was their main sport. If your athlete gets seriously injured during a conditioning session and you jeopardize his/her career because of it, it means you failed as a trainer. Therefore the selection of exercise and equipment according to athlete’s ability is so important. The gym is not a place to take risks.
MMA fighters train brutally hard to compete in their sport. Their workouts vary widely between working on skill-sets, extreme conditioning, and strength training. Some fighters also learn the hard way that it is possible to over-train for a fight, if you can believe it.  Fighting might come from some of the earliest most instinctual place of human evolution, but modern fighters have taken training and preparation to whole new levels.
If you find you are overtraining, then cut back on your workouts, starting first with the sprint portions of the cardio, and then with some of the strength training if need be, or take the day off altogether. Once you have recovered begin adding back exercises slowly to find your limit. You may find that your resting heart rate drops over the twelve weeks. This is good, and it’s a sign that your cardio is improving.
Muay Thai is the kickboxing style most commonly used in professional Mixed Martial Arts (UFC) style competitions. It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because it allows use of punches, kicks, elbows, and knees—making it the most versatile and effective striking system on the planet. Even better, it is a great workout and not boring—this motivates people who normally hate going to the gym and gets them working out!

In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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