“The physical benefits, which are great, for me pale in comparison to the great mental & emotional benefits I have received in the 4 years since I started training at the Warriors Cove.  I am much more confident in myself.  I have a greater sense of peace.  My mind feels much sharper, and I am a much happier person now.  I generally feel much more capable of dealing with whatever life throws at me. My day to day anxiety level is also much less.  I couldn’t imagine my life without the Warriors Cove, and I am eternally grateful that Mr. Arnebeck started this school.”
Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.

Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.


hi, im 38yo, training MMA 2x wk and can make it thru the PT 20min cardio (jumping jacks, squats, sprawls, jogging,army crawls, shrimps, squat thrusts, pushups,v ups, situps etc) but gas out 1-2min into the 3 min rolling rounds (and sometimes sooner) to the point where if i dont tap someone out before times up, im tapping cause im gassed and claustrophobic when someone gets on top of me.
One day three thugs surrounded me trying to take my hard-earned money out of my pockets. I snapped. Within in a few seconds I round house kicked them in the balls. You should have seen the look in their eyes! It was a great feeling. Guess what? They never picked on me again. In fact, I gained a lot of respect from them and they wanted to be my friends.
BKB isn’t the typical boxing event. Instead of the usual roped ring, there is a 17-foot diameter circular area called “The Pit,” which is sunken in the ground a few inches. The fighters have nowhere to retreat to and have to go toe-to-toe with their opponent, with either five or seven 2-minute rounds of action. Here is where the excitement starts and requires even more quickness, power and conditioning than traditional boxing or mixed martial arts.
Thanks for the great article corey, im Pro MMA Fighter from Indonesia. This is really inspired me. If you dont mind i want to ask a question. If we see many MMA training camp ,they split grappling roll ,wrestle and striking spar in different days. but in your schedule example, it’s only need twice a week for spar etc. My question is ,are we have enough spar/roll/wrestle to keep us sharp, for only twice a week? Thanks for your time man, hope can train and roll with you someday.
In April 2000, the California State Athletic Commission voted unanimously in favor of regulations that later became the foundation for the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. However, when the legislation was sent to the California capital in Sacramento for review, it was determined that the sport fell outside the jurisdiction of the CSAC, rendering the vote meaningless.[52]
The isolation phase is where a practitioner improves the mechanics and qualities of a technique and learns to apply it against an opponent. It can involve a variety of training methods including solo practice in the air or on pads/bags/shields, limited or prearranged drilling with a partner against a prearranged attack or response, and live training within a limited technical context. Isolation phase training is done forever, both to improve the execution of techniques and to increase qualities such as speed, power, and timing.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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