"I’m laughin’, but it’s nothing to joke about. We’re all part of the problem, all of us are. When an interim title is given, and the media makes a big fuss of it and a fighter makes a big fuss of it and a fan makes a big fuss of it, an interim title has value. That’s the saddest thing that can happen in the sport. Because an interim title is given in replacement for money. ‘We don’t wanna give you money, but well give you an interim title. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you a main event spot. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you that opponent you want. We’ll give you everything… but what you deserve. And that’s money. That’s sad, it’s sad. And when that’s valued, an interim title is valued by fans, by the media, by the promotion and everyone, it’s a sick joke. And it should be laughed at and it should no longer be applauded and it should be booed. And when it is, it’ll be a happy day. Fighters get paid more, fans will be more educated, and promotions will stop the bull$#[email protected]" h/t BJPenn.com • Watch
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
Victor speaks the truth, if you do train hard and you have fought woman who train hard then you would know that what you said is BS, its not PC but being a white knight and playing the PC card isn’t going to help you out in life. Are some (very very few) woman bad asses? for sure and for certain, can many of the few compare to the (average) hard training man? no way. You are living in a safe space, triggering, gender equality fantasy world. The idea of equality is a myth, and that is not a bad thing, we all have strength and weaknesses and we shouldn’t act like everyone is the same. Ask or look up Pro female MMA fighters and find out how they feel about the idea of fighting men in the ring. I’m not trying to be rude to you but you should try and get a grip in reality. The transgender MMA Fighter Fallon Fox is a good example of why men should not fight woman in MMA.

I've been training at abmma in D'Iberville for over a year, and although I haven't been able to go as much as I wanted to because of some neck problems, I love this gym! I can't tell you how many gyms I've started throughout the years and stopped because I never went because there was no motivation, they weren't enjoyable, I was never really "challenged." After a class with Tyler, I typically feel like I can go no more, like I gave all that I possibly had and there's nothing else left to give! He brings out the most you have in every class! He is that trainer in your ear telling you to "keep going!" I learn new techniques and combos every class. He meets you at any skill level you may have in boxing/KB, and he spends one on one time with you to fine tune or correct your technique. And if you keep up with it, you'll quickly feel stronger, more coordinated, etc., after every class. Love abmma!


The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Whether you intend to become a newspaper journalist, publishing in print and on the web, or a television reporter, or even an investigative documentarian, a degree in journalism can give you the mix of practical skills and critical knowledge necessary for spreading awareness of racial issues. A strong journalist is not satisfied with merely reporting surface issues, but wants deeper answers, and will do the necessary digging to get them.
At Elite MMA, we pride ourselves on offering a comprehensive variety of mixed martial arts classes and work with each student to find the program(s) that fit their needs. Not everyone is looking for the same outcome from joining Elite MMA so our classes allow you to choose the subject that interests you the most, to try something new, or try them all. At Elite MMA, the instructors and staff will work with your unique goals in mind to find the right fit for your needs.
To determine your overtraining status and your improving fitness, take your heart rate every morning. I strongly recommend a heart rate monitor, but if you do not have one, take your heart rate at your wrist, not your neck. Remember you need a clock or timer that measures seconds. Take the heart rate for a full minute every morning after you get up and go to the bathroom, but before you do anything else. Make sure you are sitting. Record the number every day, and if it is increases by more than five beats per minute you are probably overtraining or getting sick.
Edit: After speaking to a respected S&C coach that trains elite fighters, he and I both came to the conclusion that I have overstated the importance of lower intensity aerobic development, causing some of my points to be flat out wrong. MMA is no doubt an anaerobic sport - a comprehensive review of the literature on combat sports suggest that anaerobic capacity (lower end, longer bouts of anaerobic efforts) is what distinguishes high level fighters, to lower level competitors. I still believe a solid aerobic base should be possessed and the conditioning work should compliment MMA training. If MMA training lacks anaerobic capacity work, conditioning must address this. If MMA training has sufficient anaerobic capacity work, a S&C coach should preserve these adaptations. 
The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
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