Since ancient times, wrestling has been a training tool for fighters and soldiers alike (it was a core of Spartan warrior training, as well as a base for the ancient MMA art of Pankration). Today, wrestlers consistently demonstrate that their style is a fundamental part of modern MMA combat. Solid stand-up grappling allows a fighter to determine where the fight takes place, giving a significant advantage. In the past, BJJ practitioners often suffered from poor takedown games. This is something we aim to correct at Radical MMA NYC: we have dedicated takedown classes, and in our Combat Judo/ Jiu-jitsu classes we also put a premium on learning takedown skills, takedown defense, and MMA oriented Judo throws.


My experience at Warrior’s Cove has been profound. After three and one half years of training, the effects on my life are obvious. My fitness level has increased dramatically. I am much more flexible, have better endurance and health of the cardiovascular system. I also have better posture and have seen great improvements in balance. The most powerful change has been in my mind. The focus that I have acquired through the repetition of movements and the will to improve has been a potent ingredient in my growth. I am able to concentrate and relax under difficult circumstances. This is a great tool for dealing with stress and anxiety. I am more confident but also have better control of my ego. All of these factors have contributed to me making better life choices for health and family.”
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
If you don’t have access to a heavy bag, or if you need a workout you can do from a hotel room or small space, don’t worry, there’s a solution. In fact, according to Matt Marsden, a fitness instructor at Beacon College in Leesburg, Florida, who has a training and coaching background in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Tae Kwon Do, this type of workout is pretty common for MMA fighters because they travel so frequently and sometimes have to train outside of the typical gym setting.

(January 3, 2014), Fedor Emelianenko vs. Anderson Silva: Comparing and Contrasting 2 Legends, "What we can agree on is that both of these men changed the game. In a sport where everyone loses, these men beat the best of the best and held off the inevitable for the longest. Few men in any field can lay claim to such accomplishment and influence over their own sport. That is something to be applauded, examined and appreciated—not bickered over.", Bleacher report, Retrieved May 17, 2014


“It really came together out of nowhere, and here we are, man. Contract signed. It’s happening, April 13th. ... You know what the crazy thing is? I came through South Florida seven weeks ago and I just stayed here. I didn’t go back home. I felt like something big was coming. ... Here we are, I’m fighting for the belt. ... Something in my brain flipped [once I got the call]. I went from just being out here training, having fun, to that next training session, I was locked in just like that. I know the task ahead of me, I know what it’s going to take of me, and I just know — I know what it takes to be a world champion. I’ve been around world champions and it’s just in me. I just know what it takes to be a world champion. I’m going to show you all on April 13th.' h/t MMA Fighting • Watch The MMA Hour

^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
Regulated mixed martial arts competitions were first introduced in the United States by CV Productions, Inc.. Its first competition, called Tough Guy Contest was held on March 20, 1980, New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Holiday Inn. During that year the company renamed the brand to Super Fighters and sanctioned ten regulated tournaments in Pennsylvania. In 1983, Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill that specifically called for: "Prohibiting Tough Guy contests or Battle of the Brawlers contests", and ended the sport.[5][6][38] In 1993, the sport was reintroduced to the United States by the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[39] The sport gained international exposure and widespread publicity when jiu-jitsu fighter Royce Gracie won the first Ultimate Fighting Championship tournament, submitting three challengers in a total of just five minutes.[40] sparking a revolution in martial arts.[41][42]
HBO Europe and HBO Nordic began streaming all 10 episodes of the first season on June 1, 2017, in Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, while India's Zee Entertainment Enterprises took exclusive pay-TV rights to The Good Fight for its English-language general entertainment channel Zee Café, which was also the Indian home of The Good Wife.[37]
Tiffany is an American Muay Thai kickboxer who competes in the bantamweight division. Originally a Shōrin-ryū karate practitioner, van Soest began Muay Thai at the age of eighteen and was both a state and national titlist as an amateur before turning professional in 2011 and winning the WBC Muaythai International Super Bantamweight Championship the following year.

^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said.


MMA competition is legal and under the purview of the Professional Mixed Martial Arts Council or PROMMA Africa,[citation needed] which was formed in 2010 with the main purpose to regulate MMA at larger MMA promotions such as EFC Worldwide (Formerly known as EFC Africa). PROMMA Africa began overseeing Rise of the Warrior MMA events in 2010. In 2012 the PROMMA Africa Council was accepted into the Mixed Martial Arts Association of South Africa (MASA) thus granting MMA "national sport" status.[citation needed] In addition to EFC Africa, there are other leagues such as Dragon Legends MMA.[264]

         UPDATE – “Jiu-Jitsu and MMA have had such a tremendous affect on my life in so many ways….I eat better…I don’t abuse my body…I treat people with more respect…and I have newfound appreciation of the world around me…..I used to have a kind of tough-guy complex…or so I have been told ….but my training at the Cove has been humbling in a sense that guys much smaller in stature and strength… can tap me out if I make a mistake and try to pour it on with just power and aggressiveness….thank you so much for the opportunities to improve myself and others at the Cove”


Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.
3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.
The workout consists of a warmup, a circuit workout, and an additional set of grip-strength moves. The circuit workout comprises five stations, each with its own set of exercises designed to be done back-to-back. Do as many reps as possible at each station in five minutes, rest 60 seconds, then move on to the next station. You'll do that station workout three times, for a total of 15 stations.
Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]

In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!


In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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