Corey Beasley has been a strength and conditioning coach for over 14 years. He owns Innovative Results, in Costa Mesa CA, which utilizes ‘out fo the box’ training methods to assist their clients look better, feel better and perform better. Corey works with elite level wreslters, jiu jitsu, and MMA athletes. He is also RTS1, NASM Master Instructor, OKC and IKSFA Kettlebell certified, and a Level 2 Battling Ropes Instructor.
Mixed martial arts promotions typically require that male fighters wear shorts in addition to being barechested, thus precluding the use of gi or fighting kimono to inhibit or assist submission holds. Male fighters are required by most athletic commissions to wear groin protectors underneath their trunks.[53] Female fighters wear short shorts and sports bras or other similarly snug-fitting tops. Both male and female fighters are required to wear a mouthguard.[53]
I have been participating in Easton's BJJ program for over two years, and it has been a consistently positive influence in my life since I began.  I have seen vast improvements in both my fitness level, emotional well-being, and overall discipline in all things that I do.  I truly enjoy both the coaching and the community that are offered at Easton. Highly recommended!
Before moving forward, it's important to distinguish the difference between both conventional and extreme street fighting. So what is the different between the two? To answer this question all you need to do is look to the weapons in a military's arsenal which includes both conventional and nuclear weapons. The same applies to personal combat, you too must have an arsenal of both conventional and extreme or nuclear weapons at your disposal.
         UPDATE – “Jiu-Jitsu and MMA have had such a tremendous affect on my life in so many ways….I eat better…I don’t abuse my body…I treat people with more respect…and I have newfound appreciation of the world around me…..I used to have a kind of tough-guy complex…or so I have been told ….but my training at the Cove has been humbling in a sense that guys much smaller in stature and strength… can tap me out if I make a mistake and try to pour it on with just power and aggressiveness….thank you so much for the opportunities to improve myself and others at the Cove”
(February 10, 2011), Silva or Fedor? Who you prefer says lots about why you watch "You can argue the point either way, and people have, and will, and I don't have any fixed opinion on the matter other than that I would like to see the two fight at light heavyweight. What's actually interesting is that when you run down their records the two are even closer than you might think.", Sports Illustrated, Retrieved May 17, 2014
In a recent meta-analysis of the available injury data in MMA, the injury incidence rate was estimated to be 228.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (one athlete-exposure is defined as one athlete participating in a single fight).[170] The estimated injury incidence rate in MMA is greater than in other full-contact combat sports such as judo (44.0 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[171] taekwondo (79.4 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[172] amateur boxing (77.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[173] and professional boxing (118.0-250.6 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures).[174][175][176][177]
In 1951, a high-profile mixed martial arts bout was Masahiko Kimura vs. Hélio Gracie, which was fought between judoka Masahiko Kimura and Brazilian jiu jitsu founder Hélio Gracie in Brazil. Kimura defeated Gracie using a gyaku-ude-garami armlock, which later became known as the "Kimura" in Brazilian jiu jitsu.[24] In 1963, a catch wrestler and judoka "Judo" Gene Lebell fought professional boxer Milo Savage in a no-holds-barred match. Lebell won by Harai Goshi to rear naked choke, leaving Savage unconscious. This was the first televised bout of mixed-style fighting in North America. The hometown crowd was so enraged that they began to boo and throw chairs at Lebell.[25]

In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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