Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki took place in Japan in 1976. The classic match-up between professional boxer and professional wrestler turned sour as each fighter refused to engage in the other's style, and after a 15-round stalemate it was declared a draw. Muhammad Ali sustained a substantial amount of damage to his legs, as Antonio Inoki slide-kicked him continuously for the duration of the bout, causing him to be hospitalized for the next three days.[31] The fight played an important role in the history of mixed martial arts.[32] In Japan, the match inspired Inoki's students Masakatsu Funaki and Minoru Suzuki to found Pancrase in 1993, which in turn inspired the foundation of Pride Fighting Championships in 1997. Pride was acquired by its rival Ultimate Fighting Championship in 2007.[33][34]
“The atmosphere inside the Cove is truly special. Everyone trains with the safety of their partner in mind. Senior members are always willing to help newer students learn technique. The code of conduct is simple, graceful and never dramatized. My experience around Mr. Arnebeck has taught me that he is generous and easygoing, but also very skilled in the martial arts and gifted in their teaching. I am daily impressed with the passion he has for his life’s work. I feel very fortunate to have this incredible place near enough to me to allow my training and I look forward to each class I attend.”
Notes on Time Under Tension (TUT): Time under Tension method is well known as very effective in increasing strength, muscle size, or muscle endurance depending on how you use it. When you look at TUT you look at the total amount of work you place on a muscle and the total time muscles resist weight during each set. For example, you could do 5 chin ups with the tempo of 1 sec up, 2 sec hold at the top position, 3 sec lowering down. The time to perform each rep will be 6 seconds, with a total of 5 reps. Therefore the total TUT for this set is 30 seconds.
In preliminary results reported in April 2012 as part of an ongoing study of a 109 professional boxers and MMA fighters being conducted by Dr. Charles Bernick and his colleagues at Cleveland Clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, fighters with more than six years of ring experience were observed to have reductions in size in their hippocampus and thalamus, while fighters with more than twelve years of ring experience were observed to have both reductions in size and symptoms such as memory loss (the hippocampus and thalamus deal with memory and alertness). Dr. Bernick speculates that the cumulative damage over time from lesser blows may eventually prove an even more important topic of study than that of infrequent concussions.[179]
MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”
Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!

As a general rule, and for all the following programs, don't do the workouts prior to a fight training session. Do them later in the day after ring work, or well before, or on a separate day if possible. Nothing you do should limit your ability to practice the actual technical fighting skills in your sport, in the environment in which you would normally compete.
One of the worst elements of a real assault is the mental shock of being physically attacked. Even a moderate blow, shove, or grab can cause a person who has not experienced such contact to mentally freeze. Therefore, training must include sport style sparring in all areas, stand-up, clinch, and ground. It is absolutely essential that every self defense practitioner has experience hitting another person and getting hit, shoving another person and getting shoved, throwing, being thrown, and wrestling. This can and should be done safely, beginning with low intensity and only increasing speed and power as appropriate.

As you can see, it differs from the traditional programming. I have decreased the load but increased the time and also allowed for a short break between each repetition. Again, the numbers above are based on experience and they may differ for other athletes. I found this range of time, rest and reps very effective when introducing TUT for the first time. I wouldn't use it more than 2x a year for big exercises like squat and bench press. I haven’t used it for deadlifts and would not recommend doing so, as I personally think it puts too much stress on the back.
Dom Tsui has been writing professionally since 2000. He wrote for the award-winning magazine, "Pi," and his articles about health and fitness, style and confidence appear on various websites. Tsui works as a lifestyle and confidence consultant and kickboxing instructor. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from University College in London.

Because each training method we use has a weakness, it's important to use a mix of methods so that every necessary element is trained. We can't strike our partners with full force, so we include pad drills to work on speed and power. It's unsafe to train defense against random attacks at full speed and power, so we use prearranged or scenario training to do that. The important thing is to identify the weak point in each training method and be sure you've got another that compensates for it.

Unable to fight or train intensely for several years, Alice turned to food for comfort. "I'm an emotional eater, so I would drive down the road, stop at Sonic, and grab a double cheeseburger," she says. "I just ate a lot." Her busy schedule, packed with work, travel, and her kids' activities, made getting back into a healthy lifestyle seem all the more daunting. "I like healthy food, but because of the way my schedule was—with my husband working nights and me off work late and caring for the kids—I needed fast and easy," she remarks. "We ate a lot of fast food. I didn't have the time to prep."
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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