Seyi Oyesola – Oyesola is a Nigerian doctor, best known for creating the “hospital in a box,” a mobile mini-hospital, which is solar powered. Because many underdeveloped nations lack significant medical infrastructure, Oyesola's invention allows for more effective medical aid to be provided for those who may not be able to otherwise access care because of where they live in the world.
MMA is a fighting style that requires more than one person to properly train. However, certain warm-ups and practices can be done alone to increase speed and accuracy of technique for fundamental movements, such as shadow boxing, using dummies or punching bags for grappling movements and striking, and practicing footwork. Another core element of MMA is cardio, so that you don't get tired out in the ring.
I currently do 4 days of MMA training, Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri. Im looking for a well balanced gym routine. We do strength training in my gym which we do with bodyweight (pushups, situps, squats, etc) in 2 - 3 min rounds. i tried going to the gym but may have pushed to hard and was out of training for a day. this looks like doable with my schedule, but i want to target more muscle groups.
In many of my self-defense dvds, I have defined a street fight as a spontaneous and violent confrontation between two or more individuals where no rules will apply. A real street fight is not about the boxing ring, rules and regulations or any combat sports competition. It's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from serious bodily injury and possibly death.

Since 2007, there have been six fatalities in mixed martial arts matches. The first was the death of Sam Vasquez on November 30, 2007.[182] Vasquez collapsed shortly after being knocked out by Vince Libardi in the third round of an October 20, 2007 fight at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas.[181] Vasquez had two separate surgeries to remove blood clots from his brain, and shortly after the second operation suffered a stroke and did not regain consciousness.[182]
As a veteran fighter, the 6-1, 265-pound Jackson has a painful admission to make. “I suck at jumping rope for some reason,” he claimed. Perhaps it’s the volume that challenges him, as his coach will have him doing anywhere from three five-minute rounds to 10 five-minute rounds, “depending on how pissed he is at me.” To put the latter into perspective, a Bellator title match lasts for five five-minute rounds (normal matches are three rounds), so 10 five-minute rounds of jumping rope is double the time of a fight. Obviously, jumping rope helps fighters with their conditioning, but Jackson credits the age-old training method for improving his agility and footwork as well.
During an actual fight, you will be under a tremendous amount of stress. This often causes many people to tense up and actually hold their breath as they are fighting. Breathing is one of the most important and often neglected aspects of real street fighting training. Proper breathing promotes muscular relaxation and increases the speed and efficiency of your compound attack. The rate at which you breath will also determine how quickly your cardiorespiratory system can recover from a real street fight encounter. NOTE: Remember to always exhale when executing a striking tool or technique in a real street fighting situation.
At 6 a.m. every training day, Mosley begins his work at the track. But instead of pushing through a trudging run, he varies his cardio workouts by doing intervals, which are a key way to train your body and increase stamina. Intervals are short bursts of running, interspersed with longer runs. For example, you might sprint for 30 seconds at a high-intensity pace, then run at a more moderate pace for 3 minutes, then perform another 30-second sprint. Click here for 3 Interval Workouts that will whip you in to shape.
Knowing that a client's fitness level and lifestyle will most likely differ from that of a professional athlete, it's important to make the necessary adjustments to a training routine. Are these big adjustments? Absolutely not. Professionals in many ways are like the rest of us: their bodies can get better and stronger with squats, deadlifts, push-ups and pull-ups.
The rules for modern mixed martial arts competitions have changed significantly since the early days of vale tudo, Japanese shoot wrestling, and UFC 1, and even more from the historic style of pankration. As the knowledge of fighting techniques spread among fighters and spectators, it became clear that the original minimalist rule systems needed to be amended.[80] The main motivations for these rule changes were protection of the health of the fighters, the desire to shed the perception of "barbarism and lawlessness", and to be recognized as a legitimate sport.[citation needed]

“I began Brazilian Jiu Jitsu training for the challenge.  Period.  As a relatively large individual, BJJ effectively negates many of my genetic advantages.  Better yet, BJJ turns said potentials against me.  Struggling against superiorly skilled opponents has bolstered my confidence, combat mastery, and most importantly, my ability to accept failure positively. I have evolved into a better athlete, fighter, and a more humble, balanced individual.  These progressions have been instrumental in my personal and professional development.  In its totality, I consider BJJ training for life, not merely battle.”

Racial issues often intersect with political issues. Slavery, segregation, Jim Crow laws, and the Civil Rights movement provide prominent historical examples of this intersection. Today, countless issues underscore this same intersection, including disproportionate public funding for underserved minorities; water contamination in Flint, Michigan; overrepresentation of minorities in the penal system; racial profiling; police brutality; racially-motivated domestic terror; threats of deportation based on skin color and religion; pervasive institutional racism; gerrymandering; voter ID laws; and the list goes on.
Adrian, Thanks for reaching out. After watching and dealing with full time fighters for many years, I personally think that you are smart for having a full time job. Most of the full time guys struggle with finances and consistency, so youre ahead of the curve. Do you train every evening? What is your current goal? Are you training for a fight or a tournament?

I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.


Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows striking and grappling, both standing and on the ground, using techniques from various combat sports and martial arts. The first documented use of the term mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when newfullcontact.com, then one of the largest websites covering the sport, hosted and republished the article.[2] The question of who actually coined the term is subject to debate.[3]


An English degree means you are adaptable, and are not limited to a single career path. While writing and publishing are direct ways to fight racism, most English majors are not authors. You can become a teacher of literature, writing, or even English as a second language. You can be an advocate, working in charities for underserved populations, and refugee aid programs. You can take your English degree and use it to pursue a law degree, ultimately becoming a civil rights or immigration lawyer.
I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.
Is it right for you? Because the programs can vary so much, it’s important to really check out the gym and observe a bit before committing. Since much of the sparring is done in full gear, there’s often a lot of stuff to buy. That means more protection for you, though. And because of its Olympic status, finding opportunities for competition shouldn’t be tough.
“He’s probably the weakest guy that I’m gonna fight out of the guys that I’ve fought before ... we’ll see on March 9th. ... If I want to end the fight in the first, I’ll end the fight in the first. If I want to end the fight in the fifth, I’ll end the fight then. So it’s just whenever I get ready to. ... It really don’t matter who I fight next. ... They wanted me to fight [Stipe Miocic] in January, right after I just lost to DC. So I just told them no, I needed some time off. ... My body, my mind wasn’t quite right. ... If Francis is still at the top or whatever and gets the title shot, after Stipe I will fight Francis again and it will be a better fight than our last performance. ... Like I say all the time, it’s the heavyweight division. It doesn’t matter if the guys a black belt or if he’s a world-class boxer. We still have a 50-50 chance. We’re heavyweights, so it’s just gonna take one punch.” h/t MMA Fighting • Watch interview with Helen Yee

Ross training shows you how to make sandbags, but I have an easier/cheaper way. Just buy a $10 exercise ball and fill it up with water. Submerge to pump, you'll figure it out. I filled mine halfway, about 60#s. You can do Tabata front squats or cleans. They're pretty killer. So much so that I stopped doing them. But maybe you'll have more mental fortitue than I.

Learning to speak a second language can be very helpful if you intend to work with immigrant populations. With a recent marked increase in xenophobic and anti-immigrant attitudes and activities, there is a lot of work to be done with immigrants and refugees in regards to fighting racism. Many immigrants in the US are unable to defend themselves in court or secure legal counsel because of limited English-speaking skills, as well as limited monetary resources. Depending on your situation, you may even be able to offer legal services pro-bono to those who need them. This, especially in the case of immigrants and refugees who face danger in their countries of origin, can be a literal matter of life or death.
Unlike other interval training methods that primarily work to improve endurance of the fast-twitch fibers by using high speeds – requiring you to go as fast as you possibly an in order to activate the fast-twitch fibers – this type of interval instead relies high resistance to accomplish the same thing. The advantage is that because the resistance is higher and the speed is lower, there is generally less risk of injury, less wear and tear on joints, and you can perform them at higher volumes and see better results.
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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