Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
Marsden also makes it clear that bodyweight conditioning workouts are every bit as important for MMA training as throwing punches in the ring. "If there's one thing for certain in this sport, it's that your heart rate will change several times over the course of a five-minute round due to the many battle styles a fight can take. It may start as a boxing match, move into Olympic-level wrestling, then return back to the feet," Marsden says. "To train in this manner, take the idea of rep schemes, ball it up and toss it in the trash. There are no reps anymore, just timed rounds."

Of his diet, McGregor has revealed previously that he tends to avoid carbohydrates. “I eat good meat - chicken, salmon, some steak - and a lot of quality greens and some fruits like bananas... Getting enough protein is important when I train, to help build muscle and recover, so I’ll supplement with protein shakes. I drink mostly water or coconut water. It’s important to stay hydrated - first thing I do in the morning is stretch and drink water. ”
Several accomplished MMA fighters have an extensive background in taekwondo.[114] Some fighters who use taekwondo techniques in MMA are former UFC lightweight champion and WEC lightweight champion Anthony Pettis, who is 3rd dan black belt as well as an instructor,[115] and former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva, who is 5th dan black belt and still competes in taekwondo.[116]
Hey I’m a 19 year old training to become an mma fighter. I dropped out of college to pursue this passion. I still have a job but only work Fri Sat Sun and have the rest of the week to train. I currently do 2 days of strength and conditioning/jiu jitsu, 2 days of jiu jitsu/muay thai and 1 day of just strength and conditioning. So I basically do 2-a-days 4 days a week, but I’m limited to 1 workout Friday because of work. Does this sound like a decent schedule? My coach said I could incorporate sprint training during the dead space between jiu jitsu and muay thai on the days I’m doing those. Would that maybe be too much on top of the stuff I’m already doing? He said because I’m young it’s hard for me to overtrain.
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler. 

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