Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!
“Thank you for your great school. Not only is the instruction great but the entire atmosphere is warm, professional and energizing. I am now living in Orange County (South of L.A) and I am preparing for law school entrance tests. I really miss the Warrior’s Cove! Although I had no prior instruction in martial arts, I felt that your school was first class. My belief was confirmed as I tried to find a school to train at here in California. There are many good schools in the area but I wish one of them was yours. I realize now how important it is to learn good positional control skills first, and I appreciate the fact that you hold off on submissions until a degree of skill & experience has been achieved. Those I have talked to here are unfamiliar with such restrictions, and I think It has definitely been to my advantage. We are planning on moving back to MN after a few years out here, and I hope you are still instructing. Sorry the letter is so long, but I wanted to thank you. Take care.”

Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]
These fighters will often study submission wrestling to avoid being forced into submission should they find themselves on the ground. This style can be deceptively different from traditional kickboxing styles, since sprawl-and-brawlers must adapt their techniques to incorporate takedown and ground fighting defense. A few notable examples are Igor Vovchanchyn, Mirko Filipović, Chuck Liddell, Mark Hunt and more recently Junior dos Santos, Andrei Arlovski.[124] and Joanna Jedrzejczyk.[125]
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.

The workout consists of a warmup, a circuit workout, and an additional set of grip-strength moves. The circuit workout comprises five stations, each with its own set of exercises designed to be done back-to-back. Do as many reps as possible at each station in five minutes, rest 60 seconds, then move on to the next station. You'll do that station workout three times, for a total of 15 stations.
Time limits were established to avoid long fights with little action where competitors conserved their strength. Matches without time limits also complicated the airing of live events. The time limits in most professional fights are three 5 minute rounds, and championship fights are normally five 5 minute rounds. Similar motivations produced the "stand up" rule, where the referee can stand fighters up if it is perceived that both are resting on the ground or not advancing toward a dominant position.[80]
i have a question, i do mma and weight training, i just need advice outside the people i know. Im 170, all muscle on top i had chicken legs 4 months ago, and been doin legs after with my training. recently i got the on the scale i saw i was 180. i was amazed how much weight i had. i never passed 175 but always was below that. So wen i saw i was 180 i took all my clothin off and i saw i was 178. i was shcoked and happy i am t find out im gaining weight due to my metabilism. So my question, Since i do mma and weight training and i dont wana loose weight can you give me exact workout for people who wana get bigger with mma ? i do weight training some days 2 x a week some days, i do mma and few hours later i hit the gym. but i feel thats not gona help. so if u dont mind takin few mins of your time whats most efficient way to do it. btw i wana fite pro so i wana hit 185 and cut down to 170 if i can. thank you very much... oh yeah im takin nasm test ina 3-4 months aswell.
Sign up for amateur competitions. Make sure to check with the local governing body for fighting sports in your state before you sign up to compete so that you're aware of all rules and regulations. Typically when you're ready to fight, your gym or trainer will help you register for an organized competition. Talk to them and make a decision on which kind of competition or fight you want to compete in.[16]
Finally, you’ll need to use fairly long rest intervals between each rep, as much 60-90 seconds – you can also use recovery to heart rates of 130-140 if you’re using a heart rate monitor. For the best results, you can perform these intervals twice per week, at least three days apart. The low work: rest ratio, along with the high resistance used, makes these high resistance intervals both unique and effective at improving explosive-endurance.
Strength and conditioning sessions are supporting sessions to all other training. If because of your training the athlete is so sore for a couple of days that they have to miss their fighting practice, you did fail as a trainer. It may happen that you want to increase the intensity of your strength and conditioning sessions, but always make sure it does not conflict with the fighting practices.
I have come a long way since my first week and am now (11-15-04) a 3rd degree white belt on my way to my gold belt. I can’t wait to have enough experience to make it to gold so that I am able to start the submission moves. I already feel so much stronger and well balanced. My asthma has also been tamed to the point where I’m barely using my inhaler. Thanks to Warrior’s Cove I have a new found confidence in myself and the art and I know that I will actually ‘earn’ my way to new ranks. I’d rather be a white belt at Warrior’s Cove than a higher rank anywhere else. Thank you…”
Try an MMA class to learn more varied techniques. Many local gyms offer MMA classes, and some gyms ("MMA gyms") are centered entirely around martial arts. Trying an MMA class once a week or few weeks can help you learn new techniques and spar with other MMA fighters. Incorporate this into your schedule, especially if you are not training with a coach or other MMA athletes.
I would stick to a beginner routine, as the BIGGEST difference in my book between a beginner routine and the more advanced is form. Proper form is critical, as this not only can help prevent injuries, but you actually get more out of your workout with proper form. Additionally, you're giving your central nervous system time to adjust; jumping into a more advanced routine can cause problems.

So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?


An expert in leadership and human performance, Dr. Paul "Paulie Gloves" Gavoni is a highly successful professional striking coach in mixed martial arts. As an athletic leader and former golden gloves heavyweight champion of Florida, Coach Paulie successfully applies the science of human behavior to coach multiple fighters to championship titles at varying levels worldwide. With many successful fighters on his resume, Coach Paulie tailors his approach to fit the needs of specific fighters based on a fighters behavioral, physiological, and psychological characteristics. Coach Paulie is a writer for Last Word on Sports and is a featured coach in the book, Beast: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts.

MMA training programs are often split into the individual components of striking, wrestling, and submission grappling. In addition, you must work on your strength and conditioning. Because of the numerous demands on your time, the best MMA training programs must be efficient. Generally, you will want to focus on the basics, the simple, most high percentage techniques such as the jab and cross, the double leg takedown, and positional work on the ground. You need to ensure that you are training smart and resting as well, otherwise you will be unable to perform to your best.
Weight training or resistance training used intelligently, can be used to enhance these athletic characteristics. Because all athletes have individual needs, a generic program, like this one below, will need to be modified for the style of fighting, age, goals, facilities available and so on. However, here's a weights program, starting out, that you can use to set yourself up for martial arts competition fighting.
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