After UFC middleweight champ Robert Whittaker was unable to fight due to a sudden hernia and other medical issues, his opponent Israel Adesanya called for him to be stripped, and Kelvin Gastelum wandered around with his friend flyweight champion Henry Cejudo’s belt and anointed himself champ. Now Adesanya and Gastelum fight for the interim belt at UFC 236 on 4/13, and the champ is taking it in stride: “I think they jumped the queue a little bit and I feel for the other middleweight contenders, the top dudes, but I think it’s good for them to fight it out, to have to have that run before they get a shot at me. I need a little bit of time and they’ve got something to do now. ... A better thing to ask is are Adesanya and Gastelum gonna fight for Cejudo’s belt? [Laughing] Or is it gonna be a new one? Does he give it back? I’m not sure.” h/t MMA Fighting
“Research has shown that the highest percentage of a boxer’s power comes from pushing off his back leg when he throws a punch,” says Giles Wiley, C.S.C.S., a strength coach and former Tae Kwon Do champion in Atlantic Beach, Fl. That means a strong blow comes from coordinating an explosive extension of the leg, torso, and arm. “The K.O. wall press drills that motion.”

SPARology™ uses unique and cutting edge methodology that teaches School Owners, Instructors and Coaches how to design and implement safe, fun and effective sparring/fighting in a structured, step-by-step protocol. To become competent at sparring/fighting, students need to spend time actually sparring. However, when real contact begins, the attrition rate for school and gyms nation wide is around 80%. With that problem in mind, SPARology™ structures classes in a “scaffolded” fashion - a way that limits the level of contact and progressively adds more resistance as the athlete starts to develop targeted skill sets. By this method, students have time to develop with confidence and reduced frustration.
Bookers often like to book shark-fish fights, pairing an inexperienced fish (in this case, you) with a killer fighter in the hopes of packing the house to see a bloodbath. Try your best to avoid being thrust into one of these types of situations for your first fight. It would be discouraging to have to compete against a much more experienced fighter.
Learning how to street fight with the skill and confidence of a sesoned fighter is something that can certainly be achieved. As a matter of fact, I have dedicated my entire live to teaching law abiding people how to defend and protect themselves in the streets. However, I have to tell you from the start that it's not such and easy task; it will require a bit of dedication on your part. But, if you are willing to do some serious studying as well as some practical self-defense training you could learn the skills necessary to win a street fight. 

Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
The Kickboxing program is incredible at the Easton gym. It's much more than just a full-body workout, it teaches you how to find strength within yourself. I came into the program not realizing what I was getting into. It turns out I was jumping into a passion that I am excited to pursue every single day. Unlike other gyms with weight machines, Easton has classes throughout the day with coaches that are extremely knowledgeable and great at what they do. They push you to perform your best, and you always walk away feeling great. Every member and coach in this gym is fantastic, and it really feels like a family here.
“I would recommend Warriors Cove to anyone who wants to learn a very effective system of self defense.  I have over 20 years of Martial Arts training and a black belt in Tae kwon do.  Out of all my years of training I attended many different schools and have had 19 instructors.  Based on my previous experiences I can honestly say that the head instructor of Warriors Cove, David Arnebeck, is not only one of the most skilled martial artists I have trained under, but he is also the best instructor I have ever had.  Mr. Arnebeck is very patient and takes the time to make sure his students understand every technique.  The training environment is safe, clean and there are no attitudes by other students.  My favorite aspect of the school is the training in Brazilian Jujitsu which is a very effective defense and a great workout.  The training is well rounded and includes stand up striking and throws.  I highly recommend this school to both the experienced martial artist and also those with no prior experience.”
OK so for the Intermediate Level, we’re adding time and volume. Can you cut the mustard? We’re keeping the exercises the same but the rounds are now the full UFC length, which is 5 minutes and I want to challenge you to add volume too. That means we’re taking the Burpees and Swings up to 15 reps and the Jumping Jacks go to 30. The Turkish Get Up round should have you adding 1 or 2 reps as well.

7) Training MMA teaches competition. The 2nd best person in a fight is a big ol' loser. “Winning isn't everything!” It is when their are only two of you. Training MMA will bring that winning drive and spirit to the surface, which can be utilized in other aspects of daily life like business and relationships. Competition is good. A person training in MMA will not spar or grapple with too many opponents willing to roll over and lose – it's real competition and everyone wants to win.
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
Food is fuel, period. Feed your body good fuel and it will perform better. Stronger bones, quicker muscle recovery, strength, reduced inflammation, higher energy levels, and many other benefits come from eating healthier. One of the easiest ways to change your eating is to become conscious of everything that goes in your mouth. I’m not a psychologist, but somehow writing it down makes you see the difference between what you thought you were doing and what you were actually doing. Write it down!

Combat Strategies, Tactics and Techniques is a section of combat that I always preach that should be explored more by MMA fighters. Unfortunately it is not especially in the detail I am discussing in these videos. Combat strategies consists of understanding psychological preferences a fighter may rely on as a means for survival, a.k.a. “archetypes”. There are five types of archetypes that all fighters can be classified into. Combat Strategies also focuses on style specific strategies, body type strategies. attribute specific strategies and more. Tactics and techniques are general strategies used against general techniques. Where example general strategies to deal with the kick maybe at long range, or general strategy how to fight a grappler, Percision boxer as some examples. Also there are positional response trigger strategies And adren Rush strategies . There is much more to Combat then just studying boxing striking and submission grappling. This is very broad and complex section of interpersonal combat, and must be learned if one is planning on getting to a well rounded level.


Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
Edit: After speaking to a respected S&C coach that trains elite fighters, he and I both came to the conclusion that I have overstated the importance of lower intensity aerobic development, causing some of my points to be flat out wrong. MMA is no doubt an anaerobic sport - a comprehensive review of the literature on combat sports suggest that anaerobic capacity (lower end, longer bouts of anaerobic efforts) is what distinguishes high level fighters, to lower level competitors. I still believe a solid aerobic base should be possessed and the conditioning work should compliment MMA training. If MMA training lacks anaerobic capacity work, conditioning must address this. If MMA training has sufficient anaerobic capacity work, a S&C coach should preserve these adaptations. 
Pace yourself. During your first couple of classes, you may feel like you have something to prove, but you don't. You might be tempted to go full intensity as soon as you hit the mat or ring, but this will just make you exhausted and unable to train further. Remember to breathe deeply and try to execute the moves and work on your technique rather than exhausting all of your energy.[8]
Is it right for you? Because the programs can vary so much, it’s important to really check out the gym and observe a bit before committing. Since much of the sparring is done in full gear, there’s often a lot of stuff to buy. That means more protection for you, though. And because of its Olympic status, finding opportunities for competition shouldn’t be tough.
The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.
Rushfit by Georges St. Pierre is an 8-week program which includes a workout guide, a nutrition guide and training plans. All you need equipment are some dumbbells, around 25lbs should do the trick. The focus is on endurance rather than weight. The program comes with 6 dvds and it’s around $100, so the same as you would pay for P90X or Insanity except neither of those is hosted by Captain Canada.

Horrible workout. Clearly not designed by someone training ANY martial arts. Too many bodybuilding esque isolation exercises. Waaaaay to much shoulder work especially AFTER benching !! Shrugs ??!?! Most useless exercise in the book? Any MMA fighter should be periodising ther workouts anyway as there's too much to do at once". As your sport requires FULL BODY MOVEMENTS, you should stick to olympic lifts + bench + pull ups + sprints.


You know what, I was reading through this article and was like why this is pretty good for a blog but for you to be sexist towards women fighters, go to hell and be a real man. OH, why look at the big man talking shit about females on a blog. First of all of course a man is stronger than a woman that obvious but for you to personally tell a woman to get pepper spray makes you incompetent and ill make sure i dont visit this sexist ass site anymore.


The only way to stop your opponent in a fight is to inflict enough damage so he is incapable of further aggression. This means you have to know what anatomical targets are available for you to attack in a fight. This is actually important form both offensive and defensive reasons. Essentially, this means you have to assailant's anatomical targets are located in one of three possible target zones.

Submissions are an essential part of many disciplines, most notably Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, judo, Sambo, and shootwrestling. Submission-based styles were popularized in the early UFC events by Royce Gracie and Ken Shamrock, and were the dominant tactic in the early UFCs. Modern proponents of the submission-seeking style, such as Demian Maia and Ronaldo Souza, tend to come from a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu background.[138]
Sign up for amateur competitions. Make sure to check with the local governing body for fighting sports in your state before you sign up to compete so that you're aware of all rules and regulations. Typically when you're ready to fight, your gym or trainer will help you register for an organized competition. Talk to them and make a decision on which kind of competition or fight you want to compete in.[16]
After UFC middleweight champ Robert Whittaker was unable to fight due to a sudden hernia and other medical issues, his opponent Israel Adesanya called for him to be stripped, and Kelvin Gastelum wandered around with his friend flyweight champion Henry Cejudo’s belt and anointed himself champ. Now Adesanya and Gastelum fight for the interim belt at UFC 236 on 4/13, and the champ is taking it in stride: “I think they jumped the queue a little bit and I feel for the other middleweight contenders, the top dudes, but I think it’s good for them to fight it out, to have to have that run before they get a shot at me. I need a little bit of time and they’ve got something to do now. ... A better thing to ask is are Adesanya and Gastelum gonna fight for Cejudo’s belt? [Laughing] Or is it gonna be a new one? Does he give it back? I’m not sure.” h/t MMA Fighting
Every combat sport athlete knows just how grueling training in the gym day in and day out can be. Because of this, it’s often important to use training methods that can improve conditioning without putting any additional wear and tear on your body. Made popular by the late Charlie Francis, tempo intervals fit this bill perfectly and are one of the best ways to build aerobic fitness and work capacity at the same time without the added risk of injury and stress that comes along with some of the higher intensity interval methods.
Wushu Sanshou and other Chinese martial arts have also been utilized in MMA. They can be highly effective in competition due to their mixture of striking and takedowns, achieved through a condensation of traditional Chinese martial arts techniques. Most prominent and chief amongst these fighters is Cung Le, who is most notable for his TKO and KO victories over former UFC champions Frank Shamrock (in Strikeforce) and Rich Franklin (at UFC Macau). Other Wushu Sanshou based fighters who have entered MMA include KJ Noons, Pat Barry, Zhang Tiequan[120], Muslim Salihov[121] and Zabit Magomedsharipov.[122]
The United MileagePlus program is best for travelers based in major American cities and those who travel to destinations in Europe, the Middle East, Australia, Latin America and Asia. When you become a MileagePlus member, you can earn and use miles on United and its 35-plus airline partners like Singapore Airlines, ANA and Copa Airlines, many of which are part of the Star Alliance network. As a MileagePlus member, you'll accrue Premier Qualifying Miles (PQMs), Premier Qualifying Segments (PQSs) and Premier Qualifying Dollars (PQDs) each time you fly. Earn enough PQDs and PQMs or PQSs and you'll reach Premier status – MileagePlus membership levels for which you'll receive extra benefits. Additionally, you can earn miles on qualifying cruise vacations, car rentals and train fares, as well as on shopping, dining and other services. You can also earn miles for gas purchases at participating BP locations in the U.S. And since United partners with major hotel brands, including Marriott, Hyatt and IHG, you can earn rewards when you stay at properties worldwide. You may also redeem miles for flights, hotel stays, cruises, magazine subscriptions, destination experiences (think: sporting events and theater performances) and more.  Choose to use one of four United MileagePlus credit cards from Chase Visa and you'll earn miles on flights and everyday purchases.
I have come a long way since my first week and am now (11-15-04) a 3rd degree white belt on my way to my gold belt. I can’t wait to have enough experience to make it to gold so that I am able to start the submission moves. I already feel so much stronger and well balanced. My asthma has also been tamed to the point where I’m barely using my inhaler. Thanks to Warrior’s Cove I have a new found confidence in myself and the art and I know that I will actually ‘earn’ my way to new ranks. I’d rather be a white belt at Warrior’s Cove than a higher rank anywhere else. Thank you…”
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).
“If you are a small man or are a woman and want the skills to fight off an attacker, my testimonial is a must read. I’m 5’7″ and weigh 140 pounds. I’m a small guy. In fact, my frame is very similar in size or smaller than many women. The beauty of MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is that size doesn’t matter. I can defend myself in stand up punching and kicking situations, and take the fight to my opponent if needed. I now know that Judo throws and takedowns are easier for a shorter person because your center of gravity is lower and you can get under your opponent easier. If things go to the ground, I can submit or choke out an opponent who has 100+ pound weight advantage. Once on the ground everything equals out, and with training, you have a huge advantage. Your opponent will be a fish out of water. How can this be? MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) aren’t dependent on athleticism, strength or fitness. You use your brain, not brawn, and the laws of physics (leverage) to defeat your opponent.”
“It really came together out of nowhere, and here we are, man. Contract signed. It’s happening, April 13th. ... You know what the crazy thing is? I came through South Florida seven weeks ago and I just stayed here. I didn’t go back home. I felt like something big was coming. ... Here we are, I’m fighting for the belt. ... Something in my brain flipped [once I got the call]. I went from just being out here training, having fun, to that next training session, I was locked in just like that. I know the task ahead of me, I know what it’s going to take of me, and I just know — I know what it takes to be a world champion. I’ve been around world champions and it’s just in me. I just know what it takes to be a world champion. I’m going to show you all on April 13th.' h/t MMA Fighting • Watch The MMA Hour
Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a complete fighting system that teaches you how to control and subdue your opponent. You learn not only how to immobilize an opponent effectively so they can’t attack you, but also how to defeat them humanely without having to seriously hurt them. It’s the only proven style where a smaller person can immobilize and defeat a stronger, larger attacker.
In Norway, sports that involve knockouts as a means of securing victory or points are illegal, including MMA and boxing.[241][242] Norwegian MMA fighters must therefore travel abroad to compete. The Norwegian MMA Federation (NMMAF) was elected as a full member of the International MMA Federation (IMMAF) on 22 April 2012,[243] representing 49 member gyms across Norway.[244] In 2012 the "Merkekamper" concept was introduced by the NMMAF, with government sanctioning, which enables member MMA gyms to hold events with sparring matches, but governed by strict rules concerning how hard a fighter is permitted to strike.[245][246]
OK, so while round one will help you with your explosive conditioning and ability to recover fast, in this round we’re going to the ground, which is where a lot of MMA fighter’s spend a good amount of time. The Turkish Get Up is an amazing drill for stability, learning to create tension in the body and building static strength. It was a staple drill in the Turkish wrestling world back in the day. This is a very old school drill that is having it’s renaissance right now and for very good reason, it’s an amazing, basic, fundamental movement pattern.
How to: Begin in a standing position with feet shoulder-width apart. Lower down into a squat and place your palms on the ground so that the elbows are positioned just inside the knees. Kick your feet back into a plank, then lower the hips and arch your back, so your body resembles a more active cobra pose. Reverse the exercise, jump the feet forward, and explode back up to the starting position.
It's time for bi-annual reviews at Reddick, Boseman & Kolstad. Lucca gets good news while Maia has some mixed reviews. Diane gets a call that Kurt has been in an accident. A former client, Dylan Stack, returns. Henry meets with the Department of Justice but isn't offered the deal he was hoping for. He reaches out to a mysterious old friend for help. The firm finds out about a potential attack on the power grid and goes to the DOJ looking for an immunity deal. Things go awry when Lucca is arrested. Maia wants to be more assertive so she picks a partner to shadow for the day. Colin tries to resign but ends up being promoted. Marisa works with Jay to find the real person behind the cyber terrorism. Jay continues to be impressed by her investigative skills. Mr. Staples returns to cause more destruction. The city of Chicago has a blackout. Maia, Lenore and Henry enjoy a last meal together as a family, at least for a while. Diane and Kurt reconcile. Maia's dad flees after agreeing to a 35 year plea deal and Maia is arrested in connection with the ponzi scheme.
If you are truly interested in learning effective, practical self-defense and Mixed Martial Arts skills, you've come to the right place. There are many schools with instructors who have never fought in an MMA event or even trained an MMA fighter at a high level, but at Ohana Academy, we're the real deal. We offer the highest level instruction in both the grappling and striking, and as a result, our students are able to compete in Mixed Martial Arts, Thai Boxing, Boxing, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and high-level Grappling events. 
“Mr. Arnebeck will spar or grapple with me any time I ask. This is important to me, it shows he is the real deal. If I have a new technique to try or if I don’t think a technique is good, he will work though it with me on the mat and explain verbally why it will or won’t work. Mr. Arnebeck is not afraid to be tested by me on a weekly basis and realizes that I won’t learn as much if he uses all of his abilities against me while sparring or grappling. By allowing the playing field to be more even, I learn faster. He does this by allowing me to achieve a position, a hold, a sweep etc, that I normally wouldn’t be able to achieve, so I can improve. If I have technique questions, he will answer them and probably ask me to try it on him several times so he is sure I understand it. He also knows that everyone is unique physically and mentally and shouldn’t be forced into the same mold. He has always told me to use the tools he has given me but to develop my own individual style of BJJ.”
10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
Alvarez is just the latest boxing star closely associated with HBO. Others who made their name or who had mega fights with the network's backing include Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Oscar De La Hoya, Manny Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather, Jones Jr., Lennox Lewis, Bernard Hopkins, Wladimir Klitschko, Miguel Cotto, Arturo Gatti, Erik Morales, Marco Antonio Barrera, Juan Manuel Marquez, Felix Trinidad, Shane Mosley, Pernell Whitaker, Julio Cesar Chavez Sr., Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns, Roberto Duran and Larry Holmes.
Simply learning how to use a fighting stance is not enough to win a fight. You will need to remember to stick to the fundamental techniques of self defense. For example, always keep both of your hands up when fighting with your opponent. Avoid the natural tendency to lower your hands when fighting. This will leave you wide open to a possible counter attack in a hand to hand combat situation. Remember, when executing a punch or strike to always keep your other hand up to either defend against a counter strike or follow up with another strike. One of the best ways to train yourself to keep your hands up when fighting is through simulated street fighting, full contact sparring sessions and punching bag workouts.

SPARology™ uses unique and cutting edge methodology that teaches School Owners, Instructors and Coaches how to design and implement safe, fun and effective sparring/fighting in a structured, step-by-step protocol. To become competent at sparring/fighting, students need to spend time actually sparring. However, when real contact begins, the attrition rate for school and gyms nation wide is around 80%. With that problem in mind, SPARology™ structures classes in a “scaffolded” fashion - a way that limits the level of contact and progressively adds more resistance as the athlete starts to develop targeted skill sets. By this method, students have time to develop with confidence and reduced frustration.


Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a complete fighting system that teaches you how to control and subdue your opponent. You learn not only how to immobilize an opponent effectively so they can’t attack you, but also how to defeat them humanely without having to seriously hurt them. It’s the only proven style where a smaller person can immobilize and defeat a stronger, larger attacker.
Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.

“In my opinion, real self-defense is more of a mental match up then a physical size match up. Mr. Arnebeck is a unique teacher. I have found him to be very open minded to new ideas and he realizes the only constant is change. I see him as student as well as a teacher and he is constantly adding to his resume and skills by continuing his education. He has been a student of Rickson Gracie (7th degree black belt BJJ) since 1996, and brings in Rodrigo Vaghi (3rd degree black belt BJJ) and Tom Crone (highest ranking Judo Master In MN) to the Warriors Cove for seminars. Its important to me that he continue to provide me with up to date information.”


The Kickboxing program is incredible at the Easton gym. It's much more than just a full-body workout, it teaches you how to find strength within yourself. I came into the program not realizing what I was getting into. It turns out I was jumping into a passion that I am excited to pursue every single day. Unlike other gyms with weight machines, Easton has classes throughout the day with coaches that are extremely knowledgeable and great at what they do. They push you to perform your best, and you always walk away feeling great. Every member and coach in this gym is fantastic, and it really feels like a family here.
“The lady came to me, bless her soul, because I said a few unchoice words to her. But with respect. She came to test me at 12 a.m. on Super Bowl weekend. Knowing the reason I was in Atlanta was probably for Super Bowl. And I had some appearances that I was supposed to be at. I had an event with [NFL player] Devonte Freeman and Meek Mill I was supposed to be at, an event with Ludacris and an event with Snoop Dogg. And I was in the hotel waiting on her to come in 45 minutes of traffic to test me. So, she tested me around 1 a.m. And I missed those events. So I asked her, ‘Why can’t you test me in the morning? I’m gonna be here.’ [She said,] ‘Oh let me call them and ask them if I can test you in the morning.’ They said, ’No, I gotta test you now.’ Why in the hell didn’t you test me earlier today? ‘Oh I had an event I had to go to.’ I have an event I have to go to that I’m missing money because I’m supposed to be there. She said, ‘Oh, I can meet you there.’ I said, ‘No, you can’t get in, you can’t get on the list.’ So I had to wait there and she had to test me at 1 a.m. And I was not happy.” h/t MMA Fighting

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is another big part of your MMA training. One of the key components of Jiu Jitsu is honing one’s ability to force one’s opponent to the ground. This is especially important if a fighter is smaller than his opponent. Using Jiu Jitsu techniques, a smaller fighter can often overwhelm the opponent using grappling techniques. Jiu-Jitsu offers a variety of methods to get one’s opponent to the mat unlike Greco-Roman wrestling or Judo which rely mainly on takedowns.

The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

best fight program

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