The first state regulated MMA event was held in Biloxi, Mississippi on August 23, 1996 with the sanctioning of IFC's Mayhem in Mississippi[49] show by the Mississippi Athletic Commission under William Lyons. The rules used were an adaptation of the kickboxing rules already accepted by most state athletic commissions. These modified kickboxing rules allowed for take downs and ground fighting and did away with rounds, although they did allow for fighters to be stood up by the referee and restarted if there was no action on the ground. These rules were the first in modern MMA to define fouls, fighting surfaces and the use of the cage.
If Le Corre’s description of ancient warriors jumping and climbing walls seems incongruous with traditional combat training, the regimen appears even funkier in present day. Video of McGregor training before his fight with Aldo appeared online last year. It shows a montage of the fighter performing drills – presumably cobbled together in a random sequence – that might seem culled from the B-reel of a Bruce Lee movie.

This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:
Bring a training partner with you to practice and spar. Having a training partner, preferably another MMA fighter, can provide a source of motivation to work out every day. If you want to practice sparring, you could also do so with your partner. If you know any other martial arts students or have an athletic friend, ask them to train with you at least once or twice a week to reap the benefits of a partner.[5]
Visualize your results while you are working out, and know that they will be accomplished. Visualize each workout before you do it, while you are doing it, and how you did it. Get specific on your visualization during your workouts. Visualize yourself getting stronger with every rep. Visualize and feel your cardio increasing every time you are working out. Vsualize your technique and your power increasing with every punch, kick, pull-up, push-up, etc. Visualize the results you want to get, while you are training.
Speed rope training and shadow boxing are staples of a fighter’s workout. They burn an insane amount of calories, tone your entire body, and have you gasping for air in minutes. With minimal equipment needed, they can be done almost anywhere. Incorporate these two classic exercises into your weekly workouts to change up stale routines, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll be able to last a few rounds with one of the greats.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why: 

“I am very happy with my membership and training.  I have been most impressed by the people there and how friendly, helpful and approachable everyone is.  And this goes from the top down and includes instructors as well as other class members.  Having no prior martial arts training, I was a little concerned when my boyfriend convinced me to join that there would be a lot of hard core, militant types in the class that would be intimidating to a small woman like me.  On the contrary, I’ve found everyone to be friendly and approachable and easy to work with.  I am sure that attitude is instilled from the top down (meaning you) because your class members want to emulate you.  So they take cues from you and when they see that you are respectful of everyone and friendly and approachable in your training style, they act the same way.  So please don’t change a thing about that…because I continue to be impressed every class by how wonderful the people are!”
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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