It's time for bi-annual reviews at Reddick, Boseman & Kolstad. Lucca gets good news while Maia has some mixed reviews. Diane gets a call that Kurt has been in an accident. A former client, Dylan Stack, returns. Henry meets with the Department of Justice but isn't offered the deal he was hoping for. He reaches out to a mysterious old friend for help. The firm finds out about a potential attack on the power grid and goes to the DOJ looking for an immunity deal. Things go awry when Lucca is arrested. Maia wants to be more assertive so she picks a partner to shadow for the day. Colin tries to resign but ends up being promoted. Marisa works with Jay to find the real person behind the cyber terrorism. Jay continues to be impressed by her investigative skills. Mr. Staples returns to cause more destruction. The city of Chicago has a blackout. Maia, Lenore and Henry enjoy a last meal together as a family, at least for a while. Diane and Kurt reconcile. Maia's dad flees after agreeing to a 35 year plea deal and Maia is arrested in connection with the ponzi scheme.
While there is no doubt that intervals can be extremely effective tools to improve the fitness and overall conditioning of combat athletes and recreational trainees alike, lost amidst the endless discussion of their benefits has been the reality that all intervals are not created equally. The truth is that, despite what you may have read, there is no one single ideal interval or some magical work to rest ratio that should be used at all times or for all purposes.
Any recommendations for a twenty five year old female who is barely over five feet tall and ninety five pounds? I’ve gotten up to three hours of kundalini a day and 100 pushups straight, as well as two years wushu, but I’ve been in some seriously bad fights and had the shit kicked out of me. I really don’t want to keep being so damn small and unable to defend myself.
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.

Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
The techniques trained in combat sports, from boxing to Brazilian jiu jitsu, often aren't optimal for self defense. Of course there are some exceptions. But in boxing for example, punches are thrown with a closed fist. In self defense, without padded gloves, punches lead to broken hands more often than an unconscious opponent. The addition of eye strikes, groin kicks and slaps, hacks, and other techniques considered "dirty tactics" in sports, should be your primary techniques in real self defense.
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).
I have been practising jiu-jitsu from the age of 9-16, but decided to crosstrain with kyokushinkai karate when i was 13, as jiu-jitsu doesn’t teach you how do punch or kick realistic. I plan on training taekwondo for the kicking distance, wing chun for the punching distance and bujinkan for ground, weapon and grappling distance. Bruce Lee himself trained the arts separately and extracted what was useful from them. I plan on doing sparring sessions with MMA-guys once a week, as none of the abovementioned arts spare on all levels in fighting.
In many of my self-defense dvds, I have defined a street fight as a spontaneous and violent confrontation between two or more individuals where no rules will apply. A real street fight is not about the boxing ring, rules and regulations or any combat sports competition. It's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from serious bodily injury and possibly death.

In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.
Dr. Serena Goldstein explains how hormones may be responsible for stress, depression, weight gain, anxiety, and emotions. Phoenix and Bryan Winston ask her questions about PMS, which hormones relax and which cause stress.  Serena explains why women have symptoms before, during, and after their periods. They discuss nutrition, adrenal glands, energy, thyroid, and testosterone.

Repetitive explosive power is largely a function of the nervous system’s ability to rapidly recruit muscle fibers, the percentage of these fibers that are fast-twitch, and specific elastic properties of the muscles themselves. If you think of muscles as somewhat like rubber bands in their ability to stretch and contract, this last quality refers to how fast the muscles recoil when they are stretched and this is a quality that can be enhanced through training.


Along with each major, we have included a few “notable names.” This includes a mix of people who have a degree in the subject, or work professionally in a field relevant to the major. This also includes a mix of people who have fought racism through their professions, as activists, or as notable people of color occupying significant positions in the field. At the time of writing, all of the individuals listed here are living.
In Denmark, Mixed Martial Arts may be practiced but is not an official or legally regulated sport. On November 11, 2012 the voluntary Danish Mixed Martial Arts Federation held its first official general assembly in Odense, Denmark. There the DMMAF was officially founded and a board was elected headed up by President Claus Larsen. The Federation was publicly launched on Friday November 24, inviting Danish MMA organizations, gyms and academies to sign up as members. The DMMAF is working towards recognition under the Danish Sports Federation, Dansk Idræts Forbund. On November 25 the DMMAF's application to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation was approved.[215][216]

The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”


The Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan caters to flyers who frequent various destinations in Alaska, West Coast cities (like Seattle and Portland, Oregon), major transportation hubs (like Atlanta and New York City), as well as destinations in Canada, Mexico and Costa Rica. By joining the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, you can start earning miles on every Alaska Airlines flight you take and eligible flights on Alaska Airlines' 17 partner airlines, including American Airlines, Emirates and British Airways. You can also earn miles by making everyday purchases with the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card or by staying with seven participating hotel partners, including Best Western, InterContinental and Marriott. The miles you earn can be used toward free flights on Alaska Airlines and other participating carriers, partner hotel stays, magazine subscriptions or donations to charity.
The more you know about the dynamics and characteristics of street fighting, the greater you chances surviving and ultimately winning the fight. There is an old saying in my self defense school, "the more you know, the less you will fear in the streets". To help get you started on your academic journey, here are some important facts about the nature and characteristics of street fighting.
Hi my name is Anthony, or better known around these parts as The MMA Guru. I started training Muay Thai in 2013 and fell in love with many other forms of Martial Arts ever since, so much so that I decided to create this website to share my love of the martial arts. This site is a go-to resource for MMA, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu enthusiasts.
Volume indicates how much total work is being put into endurance training. In sports like running, cycling and swimming, volume will be represented by the total distance travelled during training. In team sports and sports like MMA, training volume is measured by using the "time in zone" method. How much time per training day or training week are we spending in each training zone? This will give us an idea on how much rest an athlete needs, or whether we need to push them harder to achieve the level of conditioning we're seeking.
Gerard Marrone knows a thing or two about getting in shape from a deficit. After being shot at age 21 while defending his sister, he battled back from being paralyzed to boxing again. “I still have a bullet in my body,” he says. “If I can get in shape, anyone can.” What follows is the three-part plan Marrone follows when he needs to get in fighting shape — and quickly.
Study mat wrestling. If you're young and just starting out, consider joining your school's wrestling team to get a good foundation in mat wrestling and get experience fighting in a controlled environment. It might not be as flashy as what happens in the UFC, but learning the fundamentals of amateur wrestling will make you a stronger fighter in the long run, building your mat skills and your endurance. It's also a great way to keep tabs on your weight and get into good fighting shape.[1]
Finally, you’ll need to use fairly long rest intervals between each rep, as much 60-90 seconds – you can also use recovery to heart rates of 130-140 if you’re using a heart rate monitor. For the best results, you can perform these intervals twice per week, at least three days apart. The low work: rest ratio, along with the high resistance used, makes these high resistance intervals both unique and effective at improving explosive-endurance.
Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.
As a veteran fighter, the 6-1, 265-pound Jackson has a painful admission to make. “I suck at jumping rope for some reason,” he claimed. Perhaps it’s the volume that challenges him, as his coach will have him doing anywhere from three five-minute rounds to 10 five-minute rounds, “depending on how pissed he is at me.” To put the latter into perspective, a Bellator title match lasts for five five-minute rounds (normal matches are three rounds), so 10 five-minute rounds of jumping rope is double the time of a fight. Obviously, jumping rope helps fighters with their conditioning, but Jackson credits the age-old training method for improving his agility and footwork as well.
Fit to Fight®’s From The Ground Up™ is a groundfighting program designed to tackle the omnipresent self-protection dilemma of ending up on the ground during an altercation. It prioritizes the tools realistically required to get up from the ground during an affray when your attacker seeks to hold you there. From The Ground Up™ is a three-tiered program that bridges the gap between being told it is imperative “to get back up” and how to actually accomplish that in real time.
The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17] 

“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”
Just as the name implies, these intervals are designed to push your cardiovascular system to its limits and improve VO2 max – the maximum amount of oxygen your system is capable of delivering to your working muscles. These intervals are designed to strengthen the most important muscle in your body, your heart, and are as grueling as they are effective at doing so.
Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113]
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