Well, as they say, “times are a changin’!” After Maurice Smith demonstrated that strikers can be effective in MMA through a sprawl and brawl technique, boxing techniques have slowly crept back into the sport and are now being applied effectively by fighters like Jorge Masvidal, Cody Garbrandt, Nate Diaz, and Junior dos Santos to name a few. To be clear, these athletes are mixed martial artists. Pure boxers would understandably not fare well in MMA; however, recent stellar performances by Masvidal and Garbrandt hammered home how key aspects of boxing can be applied to MMA to beat top-flight fighters. These aspects include use of range and angles, relaxed punching, head movement, footwork, body punching, and consistent use of the jab to set up power punches.

Regardless of the exercises you choose, you’ll need to perform 6-8 seconds of maximum intensity work – in other words, be as quick and explosive as you possibly can – followed by at least 90 seconds or more of complete rest.  You should not feel fatigued when using this method as it’s vitally important to use as many of the fast-twitch fibers as possible during each and every rep and fatigue is a clear sign that they are no longer producing force.  Along these lines, make sure to rest at least a full 5 minutes between different exercises when using this interval method for best results.


Training and strengthening the core especially correlates to the cage when he’s on the ground, according to Jackson. “In Brazilian jujitsu, if somebody is laying on top of you and you got to get up, your core gets tired,” he admitted. “If I haven’t been working on my core, it’s harder to get up off your back because your core fatigues. You get tired and it takes a lot of core to do certain moves and get out of moves. That’s why a strong core is important.” Plus, Jackson says, “I think I read in Men’s Health that if you have [strong] abs, you live longer and stuff.” (He’s right! We did say that.)
Francis used to have his sprinters – some of the most explosive and powerful athletes in the world – perform what he called “tempo runs” on lower intensity training days. These tempo runs generally consisted of short sprints of 12-15 seconds at 75% or less of their maximum speed with about 1 minute or so of rest between sprints.  Even though the short sprint events Francis coached were extremely explosive and anaerobic in nature, he believed these lower intensity aerobic intervals played a key role in building work capacity and improving speed.
“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”
The only way to stop your opponent in a fight is to inflict enough damage so he is incapable of further aggression. This means you have to know what anatomical targets are available for you to attack in a fight. This is actually important form both offensive and defensive reasons. Essentially, this means you have to assailant's anatomical targets are located in one of three possible target zones.

“Mr. Arnebeck will spar or grapple with me any time I ask. This is important to me, it shows he is the real deal. If I have a new technique to try or if I don’t think a technique is good, he will work though it with me on the mat and explain verbally why it will or won’t work. Mr. Arnebeck is not afraid to be tested by me on a weekly basis and realizes that I won’t learn as much if he uses all of his abilities against me while sparring or grappling. By allowing the playing field to be more even, I learn faster. He does this by allowing me to achieve a position, a hold, a sweep etc, that I normally wouldn’t be able to achieve, so I can improve. If I have technique questions, he will answer them and probably ask me to try it on him several times so he is sure I understand it. He also knows that everyone is unique physically and mentally and shouldn’t be forced into the same mold. He has always told me to use the tools he has given me but to develop my own individual style of BJJ.”
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."
The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
Want to Fight?  In addition to our public MMA classes we also have one of the area’s best MMA fight-team that includes both professional and amateur fighters.  Our training area features a Zebra Mat cage, Zebra Mats, and heavy bags.  Most importantly there are many good training partners including black belt jiu jitsu competitors, NCAA Div I wrestlers, and experienced boxers and Muay Thai competitors. We have structured practice and technical coaching support for our team.  We also have access to the best fighters in the world.  We often send our members to NYC, Philadelphia, and California for special training camps.

Volume indicates how much total work is being put into endurance training. In sports like running, cycling and swimming, volume will be represented by the total distance travelled during training. In team sports and sports like MMA, training volume is measured by using the "time in zone" method. How much time per training day or training week are we spending in each training zone? This will give us an idea on how much rest an athlete needs, or whether we need to push them harder to achieve the level of conditioning we're seeking.
If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.

BKB isn’t the typical boxing event. Instead of the usual roped ring, there is a 17-foot diameter circular area called “The Pit,” which is sunken in the ground a few inches. The fighters have nowhere to retreat to and have to go toe-to-toe with their opponent, with either five or seven 2-minute rounds of action. Here is where the excitement starts and requires even more quickness, power and conditioning than traditional boxing or mixed martial arts.

“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said.

mixed martial arts training

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