Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books.  

Our signature program, Defensive Options®, is an attentive and purposeful coalescence of Krav Maga, Muay Thai, wrestling, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, boxing, and athletic performance training, culminating in a self-protection program for those interested in living a better and safer life. The curriculum is progressive and dynamic, in the way realistic self-defense was meant to be. While others remain rooted in traditional outdated movements, we continue to test everything we do, in order to make sure what we offer is the best training available.
Zone 3 is called tempo training or intensive endurance training. This zone challenges the upper limits of the aerobic system. Lactate production starts to ramp up at this Zone, however, there is no significant accumulation as intensity is still relatively low and clearance levels are still high due to the adequate of supply of oxygen to the muscles.
In Ancient Greece, there was a sport called pankration, which featured a combination of grappling and striking skills similar to those found in modern MMA. Pankration was formed by a combination of the already established wrestling and boxing traditions and, in Olympic terms, first featured in the 33rd Olympiad in 648 BC. All strikes and holds were allowed with the exception of biting and gouging, which were banned. The fighters, called pankratiasts, fought until someone could not continue or signaled submission by raising their index finger; there were no rounds.[11][12] According to E. Norman Gardiner, 'No branch of athletics was more popular than the pankration.'[13] From its origins in Ancient Greece, pankration was later passed on to the Romans.[14]
Submissions are an essential part of many disciplines, most notably Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, judo, Sambo, and shootwrestling. Submission-based styles were popularized in the early UFC events by Royce Gracie and Ken Shamrock, and were the dominant tactic in the early UFCs. Modern proponents of the submission-seeking style, such as Demian Maia and Ronaldo Souza, tend to come from a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu background.[138]

I've been training at abmma in D'Iberville for over a year, and although I haven't been able to go as much as I wanted to because of some neck problems, I love this gym! I can't tell you how many gyms I've started throughout the years and stopped because I never went because there was no motivation, they weren't enjoyable, I was never really "challenged." After a class with Tyler, I typically feel like I can go no more, like I gave all that I possibly had and there's nothing else left to give! He brings out the most you have in every class! He is that trainer in your ear telling you to "keep going!" I learn new techniques and combos every class. He meets you at any skill level you may have in boxing/KB, and he spends one on one time with you to fine tune or correct your technique. And if you keep up with it, you'll quickly feel stronger, more coordinated, etc., after every class. Love abmma!
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113]

Mixed Martial Arts is a regulated full contact combat sport between two fighters trained in various martial arts forms. Mixed Martial Arts or MMA involves both stand up and ground fighting so it employs both striking and grappling techniques from a variety of different martial arts styles such as boxing, submission fighting, catch wrestling, jiu jitsu, judo, thai boxing, karate as well as others.

Lost in the fanfare of the glorious bout between Cub Swanson and Dooho Choi was the fight that came right after it on the UFC 206 main card. As I’m watching Donald Cerrone and Matt Brown throw down, it amazed me how quiet the Toronto crowd was. And it was understandable, because they were drained from Swanson-Choi, but here’s the opportunity to give the welterweight vets their due, as they put on a heck of a striking duel before Cerrone scored a highlight reel knockout in the third round.

After every workout you should always have a cool down period. This could mean a light jog or walk around the block or maybe a light bicycle session. One of the most important things for fighters is their flexible,  it’s important to never forget a stretching routine after a workout. Stretching is great for muscular growth as well as allowing your body to move in positions that can be strategically better for fighters. Stretching allows advanced fighters to get their kicks higher and allows them to practice more advanced kicks (such as spinning hooks kicks, tornado kicks, etc).

Thanks for the great article corey, im Pro MMA Fighter from Indonesia. This is really inspired me. If you dont mind i want to ask a question. If we see many MMA training camp ,they split grappling roll ,wrestle and striking spar in different days. but in your schedule example, it’s only need twice a week for spar etc. My question is ,are we have enough spar/roll/wrestle to keep us sharp, for only twice a week? Thanks for your time man, hope can train and roll with you someday.


MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).
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The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.
Is it for you? It’s a close-combat system, so if you have issues with personal space or slow reflexes, this will be a particularly bad choice. There are very few kicks involved (most of the time) so if you’re looking to use your legs, you’ll likely be better somewhere else. And many of the forms are extremely tough on the forearms—especially the ones with the wooden dummy—so be prepared to wear a long-sleeved shirt to work for a while. But, if you’re trying to improve your balance and concentration, it’s a great choice.
In the year 2000, MMA play-by-play commentator Stephen Quadros coined the popular phrase lay and pray. This refers to a situation where a wrestler or grappler keeps another fighter pinned or controlled on the mat to avoid a stand up, yet exhibits little urgency to finish the grounded opponent with a knockout or a submission for the majority or entirety of the fight.[130] The implication of "lay and pray" is that after the wrestler/grappler takes the striker down and 'lays' on him to neutralize the opponent's striking weapons, he 'pray's that the referee does not return them to the standing position. This style is considered by many fans as the most boring style of fighting and is highly criticized for intentionally creating non-action, yet it is effective. Some argue that 'lay-and-pray' is justified and that it is the responsibility of the downed fighter to be able to protect himself from this legitimate fighting technique.[130][131][132][133] Many consider Jon Fitch's style to epitomize 'lay and pray'.[134] Former UFC Welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre has been criticized by fans for playing it safe and applying the lay and pray tactic in his fights,[135] as has Bellator MMA Welterweight champion Ben Askren, who justified the tactic, explaining that championship fights are much harder as are five rounds long, compared with the usual three.[136]
Zone 4 is called threshold training. As the name implies, this training zone occurs near an athlete's lactate threshold (95-105% of lactate threshold). This intensity cannot be held for long, as hydrogen ions begin to accumulate. For this reason, training in this zone will improve an athlete's tolerance to pain/the burning sensation and will directly increase their ability to produce force and energy during muscle and mental fatigue.

In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.

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