Since ancient times, wrestling has been a training tool for fighters and soldiers alike (it was a core of Spartan warrior training, as well as a base for the ancient MMA art of Pankration). Today, wrestlers consistently demonstrate that their style is a fundamental part of modern MMA combat. Solid stand-up grappling allows a fighter to determine where the fight takes place, giving a significant advantage. In the past, BJJ practitioners often suffered from poor takedown games. This is something we aim to correct at Radical MMA NYC: we have dedicated takedown classes, and in our Combat Judo/ Jiu-jitsu classes we also put a premium on learning takedown skills, takedown defense, and MMA oriented Judo throws.
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.

Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
When performed to the limits, VO2 max intervals will take a lot out of you and are not easy on the body so it’s important to do them no more than once or twice per week. If you’ve got an upcoming fight, you’ll want to use fight specific drills for these intervals as much as possible. Fortunately, the changes that occur in the heart as a result of this intense cardiac work generally last at least 10-14 days even after you stop doing them so you can let yourself recover during the week leading up to a fight and still see the benefits of these intense intervals.
What to expect: There’s a lot of visualization to be done when it comes to Wing Chun. In order to keep the body in balance, it teaches the idea of a center line in the body, which guides every action. The attacks consist mostly of rapid strikes performed while moving forward, into the opponent. The stance is also different from other martial arts, so be prepared to be sore in odd places.
Mixed martial arts promotions typically require that male fighters wear shorts in addition to being barechested, thus precluding the use of gi or fighting kimono to inhibit or assist submission holds. Male fighters are required by most athletic commissions to wear groin protectors underneath their trunks.[53] Female fighters wear short shorts and sports bras or other similarly snug-fitting tops. Both male and female fighters are required to wear a mouthguard.[53]

mma training methods

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