Focus on fighting each and every day of the 30 days by training in some form or another. Exercise six days a week, with one day off to help you avoid overtraining symptoms. When you are not doing physical training, review fighting techniques on DVD and the Internet, speak with coaches or other fighters about successful fighting, or read motivational stories that inspire you to keep going.


I trained couple of months with BJJ as a noob last year. Five minutes of grappling does a lot of cardio. Way better than repeatedly running in treadmills. I recommend anyone who works out and lift weights to take interest in MMA. It’s not complete but it’s the closest thing that can *possibly* save you in street fight. Street fights are usually quick, dirty, and intense. You are either in Fight, Flight, or Freeze mode. Your body has to know and react fast enough. Whatever happens do NOT ever end up in freeze mode. When your brain shuts off. Like your body can do a lot of things you thought it was impossible when it is loaded with adrenaline and the feeling of “rush”. Like that teenage guy who lifted a car off to rescue his uncle. I think that was on the news last time.
Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
As boxing continues to evolve in mixed martial arts (MMA), so do the training methods employed. Absent from many MMA gyms is one of the most fundamental techniques used in boxing for more than a century–shadow boxing. If you are a fighter and you want to bring your boxing to the next level quickly, you must consistently incorporate shadow boxing into your training regimen. Below we will provide the rationale along with some basic strategies for getting the most out of your shadow boxing. If you shadow box regularly under the watchful eye of an expert boxing coach, you may want to stop reading here. If not, keep reading!
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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