Clover don’t listen to any of these guys. I actually do Jiu-Jitsu and there are girls in the class and they love it. When I first started smaller weaker guys who knew the right techniques would be able to choke me out. Now I do the same to big guys that don’t know what there doing. At your size you may not be able to throw or push alot of people but you can still trip them. This is why you should learn some Judo as well. Look up judo leg trips on youtube. And then once you get them to the ground a leg choke is the way too go. Your legs are probably still stronger than most guys arms.
HBO has one more boxing card on its schedule -- a "World Championship Boxing" doubleheader on Oct. 27 from the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. It is headlined by the vacant middleweight world title fight between Daniel Jacobs and Sergey Derevyanchenko, with junior lightweight world titlist Alberto Machado defending his belt against Yuandale Evans in the co-feature.
The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]
The first thing you should always do is start your MMA workout with some shadow boxing. This is done best in front of a mirror so that you can see your style of striking and the improvements you need to make while striking. If you’re new to shadow boxing, a good rule of thumb is to always finish your punching combinations with knees or kicks. If you’re a boxer then don’t worry about knees or kicks, just work on your punching combinations and your flow. Visualize the opponent in front of you and moved to create angles that could be used in a real life situation. Don’t be stagnant with your movement, allow yourself to be comfortable so that you can become more confident with your flow.

It is clear that shadow boxing is important to becoming a mixed martial artist with good boxing skills. But what exactly is shadow boxing? Much like a the traditional martial artist practices kata, shadowboxing is a less scripted, more fluid training technique that entails the fighter rehearsing all aspects of his boxing repertoire as he simulates a fight. Specifically, the fighter imagines an opponent defending and throwing punches and he or she does the same. The beauty of shadow boxing is that it can be done almost anywhere, at any time. The gym, the beach, the hallway at work, the parking lot, and while limited, aspects of shadowboxing can even be done from your seat! Fighters who regularly shadow box have striking that truly looks like art. In fact, one can often tell which fighters have put in the required reps by the shoulder roll (it almost looks as if the fighter is temporarily dislocating their shoulder) apparent while they are shadow boxing. While many mixed martial artists tend to have tight shoulders with little “roll,” watch any professional boxer as they shadow box. The difference will be apparent.
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“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”
Any recommendations for a twenty five year old female who is barely over five feet tall and ninety five pounds? I’ve gotten up to three hours of kundalini a day and 100 pushups straight, as well as two years wushu, but I’ve been in some seriously bad fights and had the shit kicked out of me. I really don’t want to keep being so damn small and unable to defend myself.
This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:
Each muscle is covered by capillaries that provide it blood and energy. Fighters that neglect endurance work crucial for increasing mitochondria density and capillarization of these muscles will have poor conditioning. Muscle mass and elite level conditioning are not mutually exclusive. Fighters who have focused on increasing muscle mass over the long-term while concurrently using training methods to increase capillarization will achieve the best results.
Barack Obama – Obama is, of course, best known as the 44th President of the United States, and the first black president, which is in itself a significant step forward in the fight against racism. Prior to the presidency, Obama's political career included positions as State Senator of Illinois, and U.S. Senator. Prior to all of that, Obama studied English literature as an undergrad, was a Civil Rights lawyer and professor of constitutional law, and was a community organizer.

The first documented use of the name mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg, in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when the website newfullcontact.com, then one of the biggest covering the sport, hosted and reprinted the article. The first use of the term by a promotion was in September 1995 by Rick Blume, president and CEO of Battlecade Extreme Fighting, just after UFC 7.[47] UFC official Jeff Blatnick was responsible for the Ultimate Fighting Championship officially adopting the name mixed martial arts. It was previously marketed as "Ultimate Fighting" and "No Holds Barred (NHB)", until Blatnick and John McCarthy proposed the name "MMA" at the UFC 17 rules meeting in response to increased public criticism.[48] The question as to who actually coined the name is still in debate.[3]


I like keeping the strength training pretty simple. Exercise selection for strength phase includes deadlift, front and back squat, overhead squat, military (strict) press, bench press, different modification of rows, pull ups (weighted or bodyweight), and various core exercises. The basic principle is to include movements like pull, push, lift, squat, and twist/rotate.
“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.
The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
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