Combat Strategies, Tactics and Techniques is a section of combat that I always preach that should be explored more by MMA fighters. Unfortunately it is not especially in the detail I am discussing in these videos. Combat strategies consists of understanding psychological preferences a fighter may rely on as a means for survival, a.k.a. “archetypes”. There are five types of archetypes that all fighters can be classified into. Combat Strategies also focuses on style specific strategies, body type strategies. attribute specific strategies and more. Tactics and techniques are general strategies used against general techniques. Where example general strategies to deal with the kick maybe at long range, or general strategy how to fight a grappler, Percision boxer as some examples. Also there are positional response trigger strategies And adren Rush strategies . There is much more to Combat then just studying boxing striking and submission grappling. This is very broad and complex section of interpersonal combat, and must be learned if one is planning on getting to a well rounded level.
It is clear that shadow boxing is important to becoming a mixed martial artist with good boxing skills. But what exactly is shadow boxing? Much like a the traditional martial artist practices kata, shadowboxing is a less scripted, more fluid training technique that entails the fighter rehearsing all aspects of his boxing repertoire as he simulates a fight. Specifically, the fighter imagines an opponent defending and throwing punches and he or she does the same. The beauty of shadow boxing is that it can be done almost anywhere, at any time. The gym, the beach, the hallway at work, the parking lot, and while limited, aspects of shadowboxing can even be done from your seat! Fighters who regularly shadow box have striking that truly looks like art. In fact, one can often tell which fighters have put in the required reps by the shoulder roll (it almost looks as if the fighter is temporarily dislocating their shoulder) apparent while they are shadow boxing. While many mixed martial artists tend to have tight shoulders with little “roll,” watch any professional boxer as they shadow box. The difference will be apparent.
Carl Reddick returns to the firm and immediately starts criticizing how Adrian and Barbara have been running it. An old friend needs help with an eviction and Diane steps up. Lucca and Colin make plans to meet at an art gallery where they run into an unexpected female. What was supposed to be a simple eviction goes in a completely different direction when Diane shows up at Paul Johnson's door and he makes some shocking allegations. Shortly thereafter, his attorney contacts the firm. Marissa helps Jay investigate the allegations and finally wins him over. Henry tries to talk to Maia, calling her and Amy multiple times and even showing up at the office. The two of them finally get worried and rush off to find him. Lucca joins Colin at a birthday party. Things get complicated fast and Lucca bolts, as she tends to do. Maia is upset when Henry ends up in the hospital and Lenore shows up with Jax. Diane continues to go toe-to-toe with Paul's attorney until Marissa and Jay find the evidence they need to expose him. The firm votes on who should be the managing partner – Carl or Adrian. Lucca makes a decision about her relationship with Colin.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]
The concept of mixed martial arts is really nothing new to many members of the martial arts community. As a matter of fact, Bruce Lee was one of the first martial artist to stylistically integrating various martial arts into his Jeet Kune Do concept. Essentially, Jeet Kune Do was a mixed martial arts blueprint for adopting what is useful in a style and rejecting what is useless. According to Lee, "The best fighter is someone who can adapt to any style, to be formless, to adopt an individual's own style and not following the system of styles." It's no surprise that Bruce Lee is considered by many to be the "father of mixed martial arts".
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).

Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.

Hope you guys liked Part 2 of this series. If you have any questions, feel free to comment in the Reddit thread, down below, or private message me. I'll be happy to answer any questions regarding the topics I discussed today. In Part 3, I will talk about the strength and power demands of MMA and training methods to develop those attributes. Stay tuned!
In a recent meta-analysis of the available injury data in MMA, the injury incidence rate was estimated to be 228.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (one athlete-exposure is defined as one athlete participating in a single fight).[170] The estimated injury incidence rate in MMA is greater than in other full-contact combat sports such as judo (44.0 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[171] taekwondo (79.4 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[172] amateur boxing (77.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[173] and professional boxing (118.0-250.6 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures).[174][175][176][177]
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
Fighters act with confidence all the time. Whether they show it when it counts is another thing. Lightweight contender Tony Ferguson always shows it, and it was never more apparent than in the biggest fight of his career against Rafael Dos Anjos. Facing a hungry former champion, Ferguson took risks and battled RDA everywhere the fight went. Why? Because he was confident that whatever he did, it was going to work. That wasn’t always the case, but in the end, he got the victory and yet another Fight of the Night bonus.

Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki took place in Japan in 1976. The classic match-up between professional boxer and professional wrestler turned sour as each fighter refused to engage in the other's style, and after a 15-round stalemate it was declared a draw. Muhammad Ali sustained a substantial amount of damage to his legs, as Antonio Inoki slide-kicked him continuously for the duration of the bout, causing him to be hospitalized for the next three days.[31] The fight played an important role in the history of mixed martial arts.[32] In Japan, the match inspired Inoki's students Masakatsu Funaki and Minoru Suzuki to found Pancrase in 1993, which in turn inspired the foundation of Pride Fighting Championships in 1997. Pride was acquired by its rival Ultimate Fighting Championship in 2007.[33][34]
Start developing and specializing your style. There are many different styles of ultimate fighters, from technical boxers to street fighters to mat wrestlers to masters of the kick. What comes most naturally to you? To become a great mixed martial artist, you need to identify your speciality and work to hone that skill into a razor-sharp point that you can use against your opponents.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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