I currently do 4 days of MMA training, Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri. Im looking for a well balanced gym routine. We do strength training in my gym which we do with bodyweight (pushups, situps, squats, etc) in 2 - 3 min rounds. i tried going to the gym but may have pushed to hard and was out of training for a day. this looks like doable with my schedule, but i want to target more muscle groups.
This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4
Another example of what not to do is to judge the skill of a knife fighter by the way he holds his weapon. The bottom line is, you should always assume that your adversary is an expert in all forms of street fighting combat. You must always respond to what the assailant is doing in the fight and not what he seems capable of doing. Deal with the here and now and not the what ifs!
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.

Speed rope training and shadow boxing are staples of a fighter’s workout. They burn an insane amount of calories, tone your entire body, and have you gasping for air in minutes. With minimal equipment needed, they can be done almost anywhere. Incorporate these two classic exercises into your weekly workouts to change up stale routines, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll be able to last a few rounds with one of the greats.
Simply learning how to use a fighting stance is not enough to win a fight. You will need to remember to stick to the fundamental techniques of self defense. For example, always keep both of your hands up when fighting with your opponent. Avoid the natural tendency to lower your hands when fighting. This will leave you wide open to a possible counter attack in a hand to hand combat situation. Remember, when executing a punch or strike to always keep your other hand up to either defend against a counter strike or follow up with another strike. One of the best ways to train yourself to keep your hands up when fighting is through simulated street fighting, full contact sparring sessions and punching bag workouts.
To wrap up the workout, set one final timer. Then, do 10 forward rolls, 10 backward rolls, 100 sit-ups, 10 ground n’ pounds (place a heavy bag on the floor, mount, and strike it; this is what’s pictured), and 15 pushups. For the remainder of your timer—yeah, we know, you get it by now—jump rope. Slate this workout into your routine and you’ll be fighting fit in no time.
I would stick to a beginner routine, as the BIGGEST difference in my book between a beginner routine and the more advanced is form. Proper form is critical, as this not only can help prevent injuries, but you actually get more out of your workout with proper form. Additionally, you're giving your central nervous system time to adjust; jumping into a more advanced routine can cause problems.

Look for a gym in your area that specializes in mixed martial arts. Learning to fight properly in the cage will take more than learning a bunch of martial arts individually and then picking a fight. You've got to learn to put it all together and train with other MMA fighters, sparring, learning, and developing your skills. You'll learn the basics and have a good resource in the community that gathers around these types of gyms.
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I train in mixed martial arts and I actually like the format. I just changed some exercises. Instead of incline press I do pullovers, then I do hang clean and press with face pulls and rotater cuff work. Also I alternate between squats and sumo deadlifts,. You are very correct about overworking the shoulders with all the punching involved and pushing and pulling involved with MA training. I've simply altered the workouts and kept the format and this it's actually turning out to be my favorite routine.
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape. 

The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.
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