There has been a growing awareness of women in mixed martial arts due to popular female fighters and personalities such as Megumi Fujii, Miesha Tate, Cristiane "Cyborg" Santos, Ronda Rousey, Joanna Jędrzejczyk, Holly Holm and Gina Carano among others. Carano became known as "the face of women's MMA" after appearing in a number of EliteXC events. This was furthered by her appearances on MGM Television's 2008 revival of their game show American Gladiators.[citation needed]
Every combat sport athlete knows just how grueling training in the gym day in and day out can be. Because of this, it’s often important to use training methods that can improve conditioning without putting any additional wear and tear on your body. Made popular by the late Charlie Francis, tempo intervals fit this bill perfectly and are one of the best ways to build aerobic fitness and work capacity at the same time without the added risk of injury and stress that comes along with some of the higher intensity interval methods.
If you’ve already got a solid base of training and a relatively high level of fitness, you can immediately begin incorporating higher intensity interval methods into your training. Remember though, you always want to begin by using the lowest amount of volume and intensity that produces results and then increase from there. Start by following the Pro Interval Training program below and get ready to see dramatic fitness and conditioning improvements.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why: 

I was greeted by a man named David Arnebeck. I could tell that he had a fighters build and an abundance of confidence. He made me feel at ease as we discussed my martial arts history and goals. I told him that I had taken 4 years of Tae Kwon Do but still felt as thought I was no good in a ‘real’ situation. I was good at forms but lacked the real sparring experience. He told me that many students at Warrior’s Cove had joined because of the ‘true to life’ training. He said, ‘kicking the air will do you no good.’  He said many things that I also heard from Bruce Lee’s fighting philosophy. He had me convinced. I joined that week. I have now found what seems to be the most effective form of self defense and exercise.
These programs can be useful to members of a particular ethnic group for developing a better understanding of how they fit into American culture, historically and presently, as well as what can be done next to continue making social progress. This course of study presumes that without an understanding of where we have been, we cannot hope to get anywhere.

One of the most important aspects of mixed martial arts training is cardio-vascular training for stamina.  As fighters bounce around the ring like boxers, engage in grappling and wrestle to the ground, the necessity for premier conditioning is obvious. Boxers go 12 rounds so cardio is more important than strength. When two fighters are engaged, or grappling each other for a dominant position the constant use of their muscles leads to extreme fatigue. As a result MMA fighters spend lots of time on cardio. Many of the same cardio exercises that are used for boxing are used by MMA fighters.  This includes the basics like jogging and jumping rope, to biking, swimming and pretty much any other kind of fitness machine you would find in your local gym.


Trainer Martin Rooney, according to an article on T-nation.com written by Rooney and Bryan Krahn, advises against spending too much time trying to find the ultimate training program. He sees too many fighters attempting to copy a famous fighter's workout in an attempt to emulate them, doing the latest fitness craze or doing endless circuits until they throw up. In his experience, the top fighters and trainers do low volume work, basic strength training and sprint work along with their technical work. In his mind, the keys to a good program are technical work combined with basic strength training and sprinting while also ensuring you get enough rest.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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