On July 15, 2017 after a TKO loss resulting from unanswered punches in the second round of his fight, 37 year old Donshay White became unresponsive and collapsed in his locker room and was rushed to the KentuckyOne Health Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital in Kentucky.[189] He was soon pronounced dead and was revealed to be caused by hypertensive/atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.[190]
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.

Zone 5 often called anaerobic or VO2 max training, is considered true high intensity training. Training in Zone 5 is responsible for increasing an athlete's ability to produce force in a metabolically acidic environment. Paired with the large amounts of perceived exertion, the duration of which this intensity can be held is severly limited compared to lower and moderate intensity training.
I'd started putting together a weight routine to go with my MMA training and I'm surprised how similar it is to this. What I was going for was based more on stronglifts / starting strength however, If you woulnd't mind giving opinions on it. It was one of the AxBxAxx style routines, with two of the x being martial arts training. So week 1 would be AmBmAxx week 2 BmAmBxx

The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
“Mr. Arnebeck will spar or grapple with me any time I ask. This is important to me, it shows he is the real deal. If I have a new technique to try or if I don’t think a technique is good, he will work though it with me on the mat and explain verbally why it will or won’t work. Mr. Arnebeck is not afraid to be tested by me on a weekly basis and realizes that I won’t learn as much if he uses all of his abilities against me while sparring or grappling. By allowing the playing field to be more even, I learn faster. He does this by allowing me to achieve a position, a hold, a sweep etc, that I normally wouldn’t be able to achieve, so I can improve. If I have technique questions, he will answer them and probably ask me to try it on him several times so he is sure I understand it. He also knows that everyone is unique physically and mentally and shouldn’t be forced into the same mold. He has always told me to use the tools he has given me but to develop my own individual style of BJJ.”
Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.

This total-body cardio warm-up takes three minutes—as long as a professional boxing round. Before you get started, practice the boxing stance: Keeping your knees slightly bent and your fists just below your chin, turn your body about forty-five degrees to the right and take a step back with your right foot. (If you’re left-handed, switch sides and put your left foot behind your right.) That’s your starting position.

The lactate threshold also represents the switch from using predominantly aerobic metabolism, to anaerobic metabolism. This is where the mental toughness and resilience of a fighter becomes more important. The fighters with the ability to push through the pain while maintaining their martial arts technique, will likely be the winner. In order to effectively delay the onset of muscular and mental fatigue, the goal of every fight should be to increase their lactate threshold.

One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
In April 2000, the California State Athletic Commission voted unanimously in favor of regulations that later became the foundation for the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. However, when the legislation was sent to the California capital in Sacramento for review, it was determined that the sport fell outside the jurisdiction of the CSAC, rendering the vote meaningless.[52]

Barack Obama – Obama is, of course, best known as the 44th President of the United States, and the first black president, which is in itself a significant step forward in the fight against racism. Prior to the presidency, Obama's political career included positions as State Senator of Illinois, and U.S. Senator. Prior to all of that, Obama studied English literature as an undergrad, was a Civil Rights lawyer and professor of constitutional law, and was a community organizer.
Demetrious 'Mighty' Johnson, makes his ONE debut on 3/31 in Toyko vs. Yuya 'Little Piranha' Wakamatsu in the quarter-finals of the ONE Flyweight World GP, and explains why he fights: “Martial arts taught me hard work pays off. I’ve been training since I was 18 years old in martial arts and it has been able to give me a life that I could have never imagined. I was able to travel to Asia, I was able to give my wife and kids a life that I did not have, and to put my kids [through] college. That means the most to me. I met my wife, Destiny Johnson, at Red Lobster. She was a server while I worked as a cook, and after giving her my number, our story took off from there. Through our love, we now have three beautiful children, and I love them to death. They are my whole world. The only reason why I keep going is my family and, obviously, the competition to prove that I’m the best in the world. But it’s just a fight, just to prove who is better." h/t Yahoo.sg

10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
In general, fighters who cannot win fights through lightning offense, or are more suited to win fights in the later rounds or via decision are commonly known as grinders. Grinders aim to shut down their opponent's game plan and chip away at them via clinching, smothering and ground-and-pound for most of the rounds. Prominent examples of grinders are Pat Healy,[143] and Chael Sonnen.[144]
         UPDATE – “Jiu-Jitsu and MMA have had such a tremendous affect on my life in so many ways….I eat better…I don’t abuse my body…I treat people with more respect…and I have newfound appreciation of the world around me…..I used to have a kind of tough-guy complex…or so I have been told ….but my training at the Cove has been humbling in a sense that guys much smaller in stature and strength… can tap me out if I make a mistake and try to pour it on with just power and aggressiveness….thank you so much for the opportunities to improve myself and others at the Cove”
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).

If a fighter has been doing two workouts per day for a month straight, has poor nutrition, doesn’t sleep much, and is stressed out, the last thing he needs is a ball-busting, crusher workout that is just going to break him down even more. Remember, these guys are punching each other in the face, taking each other down, and tying each other into knots. They are always banged up somewhere.


HBO Europe and HBO Nordic began streaming all 10 episodes of the first season on June 1, 2017, in Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, while India's Zee Entertainment Enterprises took exclusive pay-TV rights to The Good Fight for its English-language general entertainment channel Zee Café, which was also the Indian home of The Good Wife.[37]
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