These are the weights you will be working with for the first phase of the program. Note that at the end of the first phase you will actually be doing more reps than your max at the start, so it may say something like “2 x 10 with your 10-rep max.” This is because by the end you should be stronger and fitter than when you started. In the following twelve-week phases we will re-evaluate your maxes.
^ "Source: UFC buys Pride for less than $70M". Associated Press, ESPN. March 27, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-15. "This is really going to change the face of MMA. Literally creating a sport that could be as big around the world as soccer. I liken it somewhat to when the NFC and AFC came together to create the NFL" —Lorenzo Fertitta, one of the UFC's majority owners
If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims. 

Get the basics down first. To get better at MMA, you'll need to become proficient in basic strikes and grappling techniques. The basic punches include hooks, jabs, straights, and uppercuts. [9] You'll also want to learn basic push and roundhouse kicks. In grappling, you'll want to learn the different positions and how to do basic moves like armbars, triangle chokes, and the rear naked choke.[10] Practice mastering these basic techniques before advancing to more elaborate techniques.

Of course, you can fight racism in your everyday life, regardless of what you study. Practice mindfulness, awareness, and kindness. Be aware of your own actions and assumptions. Call out racism when you see it. Protest, volunteer, tutor, donate money to good causes and don't support bad ones. You do not need to pursue a career that is directly related to any of the degrees on this list to fight racism; education for itself is a significant step and noble pursuit. But, if you want to do more still, you can make a career out of fighting racism, and the degrees on this list are some of the best for helping you do just that.
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.
They say that boxing is dead and MMA is holding the smoking gun pointed towards it. While the “sweet science of pugilism” has certainly seen better days and it’s cage fighting brother sport has made major strides in the last decade, boxing is far from gone and certainly not forgotten. And it has had a boost in popularity due to a new organization, BKB, in which the fighters have to be in top shape due to the size – or lack thereof – of the fighting arena.
Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.
The AEROBIC system (also known as the oxidative system) is the slowest acting energy system in our body, yet it is capable of creating the most energy. At rest, around 65-70% of your energy comes from the utilization of fat, 25-30% comes from carbohydrates, while less than 5-10% comes from amino acids (protein). As intensity increases, these percentages shift - carbohydrates become more important because of its quicker availability in the body. That's why you need adequate blood sugar (carb) levels when exercising or doing intensive activity. The aerobic energy system is the predominant system involved in exercise lasting 2-3 minutes, to hours and even days. The aerobic system (aero meaning air) requires oxygen to utilize fat stores (body fat) and carbohydrate stores (in your muscles and liver). 
Hope you guys liked Part 2 of this series. If you have any questions, feel free to comment in the Reddit thread, down below, or private message me. I'll be happy to answer any questions regarding the topics I discussed today. In Part 3, I will talk about the strength and power demands of MMA and training methods to develop those attributes. Stay tuned!
Strength and conditioning sessions are supporting sessions to all other training. If because of your training the athlete is so sore for a couple of days that they have to miss their fighting practice, you did fail as a trainer. It may happen that you want to increase the intensity of your strength and conditioning sessions, but always make sure it does not conflict with the fighting practices.
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Simply learning how to use a fighting stance is not enough to win a fight. You will need to remember to stick to the fundamental techniques of self defense. For example, always keep both of your hands up when fighting with your opponent. Avoid the natural tendency to lower your hands when fighting. This will leave you wide open to a possible counter attack in a hand to hand combat situation. Remember, when executing a punch or strike to always keep your other hand up to either defend against a counter strike or follow up with another strike. One of the best ways to train yourself to keep your hands up when fighting is through simulated street fighting, full contact sparring sessions and punching bag workouts. 

"I’m laughin’, but it’s nothing to joke about. We’re all part of the problem, all of us are. When an interim title is given, and the media makes a big fuss of it and a fighter makes a big fuss of it and a fan makes a big fuss of it, an interim title has value. That’s the saddest thing that can happen in the sport. Because an interim title is given in replacement for money. ‘We don’t wanna give you money, but well give you an interim title. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you a main event spot. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you that opponent you want. We’ll give you everything… but what you deserve. And that’s money. That’s sad, it’s sad. And when that’s valued, an interim title is valued by fans, by the media, by the promotion and everyone, it’s a sick joke. And it should be laughed at and it should no longer be applauded and it should be booed. And when it is, it’ll be a happy day. Fighters get paid more, fans will be more educated, and promotions will stop the bull$#[email protected]" h/t BJPenn.com • Watch

I have been practising jiu-jitsu from the age of 9-16, but decided to crosstrain with kyokushinkai karate when i was 13, as jiu-jitsu doesn’t teach you how do punch or kick realistic. I plan on training taekwondo for the kicking distance, wing chun for the punching distance and bujinkan for ground, weapon and grappling distance. Bruce Lee himself trained the arts separately and extracted what was useful from them. I plan on doing sparring sessions with MMA-guys once a week, as none of the abovementioned arts spare on all levels in fighting.
Wrestling is another huge component of MMA training. If you have watched even one MMA match, you can clearly see the advantage of having strong wrestling skills. Being able to take down an opponent and pin them to the mat is huge. Greco-Roman wrestling is one of the most ancient sports, so while MMA might seem like something new, it is truly comprised of a variety of ancient fighting techniques.
Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!
Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.

Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]


Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113]
The workout consists of a warmup, a circuit workout, and an additional set of grip-strength moves. The circuit workout comprises five stations, each with its own set of exercises designed to be done back-to-back. Do as many reps as possible at each station in five minutes, rest 60 seconds, then move on to the next station. You'll do that station workout three times, for a total of 15 stations.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]
 Corey Beasley has been a strength and conditioning coach for over 14 years. He owns Innovative Results, in Costa Mesa CA, which utilizes ‘out fo the box’ training methods to assist their clients look better, feel better and perform better. Corey works with elite level wreslters, jiu jitsu, and MMA athletes. He is also RTS1, NASM Master Instructor, OKC and IKSFA Kettlebell certified, and a Level 2 Battling Ropes Instructor.

Even with this seamless integration of styles, members can still focus on what they want by attending Standing Fighting Days for an emphasis on Kickboxing, Clinching & Takedowns, or Ground Fighting for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu & Ground Fighting techniques. Of course, real fighting includes both standing and ground fighting, so both are essential for those who want a complete system of fighting without major weaknesses.

Even with the natural progression of MMA to more “well rounded” approaches, purer forms of boxing were employed by only a handful of fighters. This is likely because leagues of athletes followed in the footsteps of these pioneers who tended to use more of a forward moving Muay Thai or Kickboxing based approach rooted in power techniques as opposed to the finesse and lateral movement hallmark to many of the greatest boxers. And for good reason, boxing by itself is a liability in MMA because of the variety of offenses available that pure boxing technique does not account for (e.g. kicks, takedowns, clinch, etc.). In fact, the emergence of boxing techniques as an effective arsenal in the cage was squashed in UFC 1 when boxer Art Jimmerson, sporting one boxing glove on his lead hand, was taken down and submitted in just a couple of minutes.

Francis used to have his sprinters – some of the most explosive and powerful athletes in the world – perform what he called “tempo runs” on lower intensity training days. These tempo runs generally consisted of short sprints of 12-15 seconds at 75% or less of their maximum speed with about 1 minute or so of rest between sprints.  Even though the short sprint events Francis coached were extremely explosive and anaerobic in nature, he believed these lower intensity aerobic intervals played a key role in building work capacity and improving speed.

In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
“When I found the Warriors Cove I was impressed in the safe manner that Mr. Arnebeck conducts his classes. Also the senior students impressed me in the way they help to make sure new students learn the techniques correctly. I started BJJ just to get in shape and lose weight. If you really want to lose weight just show up to class!!!! The side effects….. you will learn real self defense.”
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]
These fighters will often study submission wrestling to avoid being forced into submission should they find themselves on the ground. This style can be deceptively different from traditional kickboxing styles, since sprawl-and-brawlers must adapt their techniques to incorporate takedown and ground fighting defense. A few notable examples are Igor Vovchanchyn, Mirko Filipović, Chuck Liddell, Mark Hunt and more recently Junior dos Santos, Andrei Arlovski.[124] and Joanna Jedrzejczyk.[125]
The isolation phase is where a practitioner improves the mechanics and qualities of a technique and learns to apply it against an opponent. It can involve a variety of training methods including solo practice in the air or on pads/bags/shields, limited or prearranged drilling with a partner against a prearranged attack or response, and live training within a limited technical context. Isolation phase training is done forever, both to improve the execution of techniques and to increase qualities such as speed, power, and timing.
If you’ve ever seen a mixed martial arts (MMA) fight, you’ve probably noticed the athletes’ impressive physiques, which are largely due to their intense training regimens and nutritional habits. While you may not have time to train as intensely as a professional athlete, you can incorporate some of their strength-training moves into your workouts and start developing a notable six-pack of your own.

If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
The Romanian Mixed Martial Arts Federation (RMMAF) was established in 2012 as a legal non-profit federation under the Ministry of Youth and Sport in Romania. The Federation was formed by the board of MMA organization AGON and backed by a broad representation of the Romanian MMA community, including around twenty MMA clubs and non-profit MMA organizations around the country. Based in Bucharest, Romania AGON club was founded in its present legal form in June 2012, following a long period of time of acting under different other organisations, with Gheorghe Stanciu elected as its president. The RMMAF is affiliated to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF).[250][251][252][253]
May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground. 
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