"Our mission at HBO Sports is to elevate the brand. We look for television projects that are high-profile, high-access, and highly ambitious in the stories they seek to tell and the quality of production in telling them," HBO Sports said in a statement. "Boxing has been part of our heritage for decades. During that time, the sport has undergone a transformation. It is now widely available on a host of networks and streaming services. There is more boxing than ever being televised and distributed. In some cases, this programming is very good. But from an entertainment point of view, it's not unique.
In February 2016, Michelle and Robert King, when asked about a spin-off, stated that there was a possibility for a spin-off series.[23] In May 2016, CBS was in final negotiations to set up a spin-off featuring Christine Baranski reprising her role as Diane Lockhart, but which would air on CBS All Access instead of the network.[4] The spin-off was officially ordered to series on May 18, with Cush Jumbo returning as well.[7] In September 2016, it was confirmed that the 10 episode spin-off would premiere in February 2017, with the story picking up a year after the final episode of the original series and seeing Diane pushed out of her firm after a financial scam involving her mentee wipes out her savings, resulting in her move to Lucca Quinn's firm.[2] The series was initially planned to air in May 2017, but was moved to February 2017 after production delays forced CBS to postpone the premiere of the new series, Star Trek: Discovery.[3] After months of speculation, CBS revealed the title for the spin-off series, which was revealed to be The Good Fight, on October 31, 2016.[24] It was announced that The Good Fight would premiere on February 19, 2017.[1] CBS released the first trailer for the spinoff on December 18, 2016, featuring footage from the premiere and later episodes.[25]
So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?

In his instructional book, Anderson Silva admitted the influence of taekwondo in the formation of his unique style. In each of my fights, I tried to utilize techniques from all the various styles I had studied. I threw taekwondo kicks. I threw Muay Thai knees and elbows, and I used my knowledge of Brazilian jiu-jitsu on the ground.[117] Anthony Pettis has also stated that he is definitely a traditional martial artist first and a mixed martial artist second,[115] as well as his style of attacking is different [because of his] taekwondo background.[118]


Our Keep-It™ guarantee is valid for the first-time purchase of a formula, and redeemable up to three months (90 days) after the purchase date. Multiple bottles, foods, apparel and gear do not fall under this guarantee, however, they may be applicable for return. Fitness equipment, personal care products, knowledge purchases, digital products, and DVDs are not eligible for return or refund. For more information and a full list of products that qualify, visit our Keep-It™ page. Further details can be found on our Refund Policy support page.
On February 29, 2012, the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF) was set up to bring international structure, development and support to mixed martial arts worldwide.[162] IMMAF launched with support of market leader, the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[163][164] The IMMAF is a non-profit, democratic federation organized according to international federation standards to ensure that MMA as a sport is allowed the same recognition, representation and rights as all other major sports. The IMMAF is registered under Swedish law and is founded on democratic principles, as outlined in their statutes.[165] As of March 2015, there are 39 total members from 38[166] countries, which come from Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Ireland (Northern Ireland), Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Lithuania, Malaysia, Nepal, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Romania, The Seychelles, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.[166] [166][166]
Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
Every combat sport athlete knows just how grueling training in the gym day in and day out can be. Because of this, it’s often important to use training methods that can improve conditioning without putting any additional wear and tear on your body. Made popular by the late Charlie Francis, tempo intervals fit this bill perfectly and are one of the best ways to build aerobic fitness and work capacity at the same time without the added risk of injury and stress that comes along with some of the higher intensity interval methods.
The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.
Well, as they say, “times are a changin’!” After Maurice Smith demonstrated that strikers can be effective in MMA through a sprawl and brawl technique, boxing techniques have slowly crept back into the sport and are now being applied effectively by fighters like Jorge Masvidal, Cody Garbrandt, Nate Diaz, and Junior dos Santos to name a few. To be clear, these athletes are mixed martial artists. Pure boxers would understandably not fare well in MMA; however, recent stellar performances by Masvidal and Garbrandt hammered home how key aspects of boxing can be applied to MMA to beat top-flight fighters. These aspects include use of range and angles, relaxed punching, head movement, footwork, body punching, and consistent use of the jab to set up power punches.
Mixed martial arts appear everywhere. For example, mixed martial arts events and personalities appear in just about every magazine such as GQ, Newsweek, Time, Playboy as well as smaller publications like Black Belt Magazine (for a complete list of mixed martial arts magazines, see my list below). Mixed martial arts also frequently appear in television shows, xbox games and movies. Mixed martial arts have their reality TV shows such as Tapout, The Ultimate Fighter and Caged that focus exclusively on the life of mixed martial arts personalities. Mixed martial arts also have their own unique workout gear and clothing line such as Tapout, Bad Boy MMA, Affliction, Cage Fighter and Xtreme Couture. For better or worse, it seems like mixed martial arts has taken over the world.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is another big part of your MMA training. One of the key components of Jiu Jitsu is honing one’s ability to force one’s opponent to the ground. This is especially important if a fighter is smaller than his opponent. Using Jiu Jitsu techniques, a smaller fighter can often overwhelm the opponent using grappling techniques. Jiu-Jitsu offers a variety of methods to get one’s opponent to the mat unlike Greco-Roman wrestling or Judo which rely mainly on takedowns.
Lucca and Maia have a meeting with the FBI. Maia has offered to tell them everything she knows about the ponzi scheme as long as she's granted immunity. Diane and Adrian get wind of a new police brutality case but are surprised when they see the victim. Maia works with the FBI agent to recover memories from her teenage years that may shed light on who is behind the scheme. Diane and Adrian's victim is having a hard time finding sympathy in the justice system given his criminal history. Jay finds evidence to show that the police officer has a history of bad conduct. Maia struggles to remember key moments in her life and possibly the ponzi scheme. Diane and Adrian grow closer as friends and colleagues. Lucca offers guidance as Maia is confronted with uncomfortable truths about her past.
The first documented use of the name mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg, in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when the website newfullcontact.com, then one of the biggest covering the sport, hosted and reprinted the article. The first use of the term by a promotion was in September 1995 by Rick Blume, president and CEO of Battlecade Extreme Fighting, just after UFC 7.[47] UFC official Jeff Blatnick was responsible for the Ultimate Fighting Championship officially adopting the name mixed martial arts. It was previously marketed as "Ultimate Fighting" and "No Holds Barred (NHB)", until Blatnick and John McCarthy proposed the name "MMA" at the UFC 17 rules meeting in response to increased public criticism.[48] The question as to who actually coined the name is still in debate.[3]

Originally promoted as a competition to find the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat, competitors from different fighting styles were pitted against one another in contests with relatively few rules.[8] Later, individual fighters incorporated multiple martial arts into their style. MMA promoters were pressured to adopt additional rules to increase competitors' safety, to comply with sport regulations and to broaden mainstream acceptance of the sport.[9] Following these changes, the sport has seen increased popularity with a pay-per-view business that rivals boxing and professional wrestling.[10]
Author Danny Indio has done a good job in the book of covering the 4 fighting ranges: Kicking Range, Punching Range, Trapping, and Grappling (both standing and ground). He covers stances and movement, upper body arm and hand strikes and defenses, lower body kicks and defenses, standing clinch fighting and defenses, leg takedowns and defenses, basic ground grappling positions and escapes, including ground strikes, arm bars and chokes plus defenses against each. There is some knife defense examples both standing and from the ground that I question a little, however, I concur with his principle of painfully damaging opponent first (striking attacker eyes, throat, groin, knee) before attempting disarm of the knife. See Table of Context for more subject matter details. Of course, there are volumes of books written about some of his individual topics in far more detail, however, overall I think he has written a comprehensive self- defense book. Besides it never hurts to go over the basics once in a while,
While mixed martial arts was initially practiced almost exclusively by competitive fighters, this is no longer the case. As the sport has become more mainstream and more widely taught, it has become accessible to wider range of practitioners of all ages. Proponents of this sort of training argue that it is safe for anyone, of any age, with varying levels of competitiveness and fitness.[95][96]

Kickboxing classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a mixture of several techniques employed in the rest of the forms of martial arts. Referred to as the “science of 8 limbs” simply because almost all parts of the body are employed during the fight. The forehead, the fists, elbows, knees, and feet are often used as the weapons. It has been around for more than 2000 years and is basically regarded as the oldest variant of martial arts.


Especially used by fighters with strong wrestling background when facing a highly skilled grappler, or by wrestlers who prefer stand-up fights. Usually fighters who adopt this strategy use takedowns only for scoring, allowing the adversary to stand up and continue the fight. They also want to land clear strikes and control the octagon. In order to win the fight by decision all score oriented fighters have to have strong defensive techniques and avoid takedowns.[139]
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