The AEROBIC system (also known as the oxidative system) is the slowest acting energy system in our body, yet it is capable of creating the most energy. At rest, around 65-70% of your energy comes from the utilization of fat, 25-30% comes from carbohydrates, while less than 5-10% comes from amino acids (protein). As intensity increases, these percentages shift - carbohydrates become more important because of its quicker availability in the body. That's why you need adequate blood sugar (carb) levels when exercising or doing intensive activity. The aerobic energy system is the predominant system involved in exercise lasting 2-3 minutes, to hours and even days. The aerobic system (aero meaning air) requires oxygen to utilize fat stores (body fat) and carbohydrate stores (in your muscles and liver). 
Our instructors are professionals who are passionate about MMA Competition and training. They are some of the area’s best and most exciting fighters but most importantly they are excellent at conveying their knowledge to students.  Our reputation is built on great instruction, so we are very proud of the quality of classes and practices facilitated by our instructors.
“In my opinion, real self-defense is more of a mental match up then a physical size match up. Mr. Arnebeck is a unique teacher. I have found him to be very open minded to new ideas and he realizes the only constant is change. I see him as student as well as a teacher and he is constantly adding to his resume and skills by continuing his education. He has been a student of Rickson Gracie (7th degree black belt BJJ) since 1996, and brings in Rodrigo Vaghi (3rd degree black belt BJJ) and Tom Crone (highest ranking Judo Master In MN) to the Warriors Cove for seminars. Its important to me that he continue to provide me with up to date information.”
Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Knowing that a client's fitness level and lifestyle will most likely differ from that of a professional athlete, it's important to make the necessary adjustments to a training routine. Are these big adjustments? Absolutely not. Professionals in many ways are like the rest of us: their bodies can get better and stronger with squats, deadlifts, push-ups and pull-ups.
Volume indicates how much total work is being put into endurance training. In sports like running, cycling and swimming, volume will be represented by the total distance travelled during training. In team sports and sports like MMA, training volume is measured by using the "time in zone" method. How much time per training day or training week are we spending in each training zone? This will give us an idea on how much rest an athlete needs, or whether we need to push them harder to achieve the level of conditioning we're seeking.

I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
Do a strength training workout three or four days a week. Weight training using free weights or specialized machines at the gym are good choices. Alternate between your upper and lower body each time you work out. You want to push yourself by lifting the heaviest possible weights, but you don't want to hurt yourself or become sore. Lessen the amount of weights or number of repetitions if you need to.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]

During the late 1960s to early 1970s, the concept of combining the elements of multiple martial arts was popularized in the West by Bruce Lee via his system of Jeet Kune Do. Lee believed that "the best fighter is not a Boxer, Karate or Judo man. The best fighter is someone who can adapt to any style, to be formless, to adopt an individual's own style and not following the system of styles." In 2004, UFC President Dana White would call Lee the "father of mixed martial arts" stating: "If you look at the way Bruce Lee trained, the way he fought, and many of the things he wrote, he said the perfect style was no style. You take a little something from everything. You take the good things from every different discipline, use what works, and you throw the rest away".[27]
Jeremy Pacatiw has represented the Philippines inside the Brave cage in Brazil, India, Morocco, and Pakistan, and is excited to be coming home, as the world's only truly global mixed martial arts organization lands in Manila: "I learned a lot in this sport. The discipline, attitude, mental toughness, humility. All of those things changed my life. It changed the way I view life and my way of life as well. Now I'm able to support myself, help my parents, buy my own things. I want to inspire others through sport. I want to show the youth that all things are possible. I feel like I need to be a good example for the next generation and I think that starts with respect. ... I always took my losses as a success, because I've learned a lot from them. They give me motivation, they're a stepping stone to my eventual success."
As a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu brown belt I’d love to spar with you and test how “Spartan” like you really are. Being bold and determined is a cute start but not much of a match for an experienced jiu jitsu competitor. I dig your blog and respect your success but I can’t imagine your particularly good. If you were you’d know about top female BJJ competitors like Hillary Williams who consistently tap out grown ass men (and would make you their bitch) in spectacular fashion. So Clover, look up top female brazilian jiu jitsu black belts (like Hillary Williams) and know that small woman can absolutely defend themselves from attackers, male or female, including someone like Victor. He gets alot of things right but the effectiveness of BJJ for women is not one of them. It will take alot of boldness and determination as well as alot of sweating and drilling but the effectiveness of BJJ for women cannot be understated. The proof is all over youtube. just type in “BJJ girl chokes guy out”

“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.
How and when to precisely use the different interval methods described above is a matter of your individual physical abilities, needs, goals, and overall training program. Just as no two athletes are exactly alike in these areas, no one-size-fits-all interval training method or interval training program will ever produce the same results as one that takes these individual factors into account.
The reason why we use the wording “Lead” and “Rear” instead of “Left” and “Right” is because when switching stances this can get confusing. Someone who is trying to master all styles of fighting should be able to fight in both Orthodox (Left foot first) and Southpaw (Right foot first). This is obviously better suited for MMA because it gives your opponent a different look for takedowns, while in boxing you’re only using punches and most boxers preferably only master one stance.

The second, 5-minute round is similar in function to the first, but focused solely on kneeing and kicking movements instead of boxing. "I kick low, high, and mid-range, and often double-up my kicks—meaning I throw a left kick, left kick, one after the other as fast as possible," Camozzi says. "I also mix up high and low. I might throw a low left kick immediately followed by a high right kick." The point is to keep the pace fast and high-volume for the entire 5-minute round, but you're welcome to get creative as you go.


Do 30 to 60 minutes of a moderate-intensity aerobic activity three or four days per week. Moderate-intensity activities include cycling, jogging, swimming and hitting a punching bag. This will help improve your cardiovascular system, which means more oxygen will be used throughout your body during your big fight. Your heart and lungs will work more efficiently and you will be less tired while you are fighting.
Horrible workout. Clearly not designed by someone training ANY martial arts. Too many bodybuilding esque isolation exercises. Waaaaay to much shoulder work especially AFTER benching !! Shrugs ??!?! Most useless exercise in the book? Any MMA fighter should be periodising ther workouts anyway as there's too much to do at once". As your sport requires FULL BODY MOVEMENTS, you should stick to olympic lifts + bench + pull ups + sprints.
One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.
Our MMA classes are open all levels of experience.  The  format is primarily learning the technical aspects of MMA with little live training and no sparring.  All serious MMA fighters train in various specific disciplines. These usually include Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, and others.  Today, some gyms and martial arts schools teach pieces of these various arts and call it MMA Training.  In our classes we focus on techniques specific to MMA. An example is controlling an opponent against the cage.  Our cirriculum is based on techniques and methods used by Renzo Gracie’s world class team.
The term no holds barred was used originally to describe the wrestling method prevalent in catch wrestling tournaments during the late 19th century wherein no wrestling holds were banned from the competition, regardless of how dangerous they might be. The term was applied to mixed martial arts matches, especially at the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[106]
“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”
In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
Almost everyone is familiar with plyometrics and the entire paradigm of plyometric training was designed largely developed to serve this exact purpose. Reactive power intervals are an effective blend of plyometrics and intervals and while most interval methods fall short in improving explosiveness because they are often performed in a constant state of fatigue, reactive power intervals take a unique approach and produce far better results.

Several accomplished MMA fighters have an extensive background in taekwondo.[114] Some fighters who use taekwondo techniques in MMA are former UFC lightweight champion and WEC lightweight champion Anthony Pettis, who is 3rd dan black belt as well as an instructor,[115] and former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva, who is 5th dan black belt and still competes in taekwondo.[116]

When studying English, there are basically three tracks to consider: literature, creative writing, and rhetoric. English is not merely the study of books and words. It is the study of the human condition, an investigation of who we are, where we have been, how we got here, and where we are going. It shows us the struggles and triumphs of the individual, and the conditions that shape our social order.
Let’s take a sledgehammer as an example. Who remembers David Faulkner from The Ultimate Fighter U.S. versus U.K., when he missed the tire and instead hit the concrete and his leg with a sledgehammer? Does it mean that sledgehammer exercises are bad? Not at all, it just means he shouldn't have been doing it, as he had no idea how to use the sledgehammer. Sometimes the exercises that look cool are not the best choices. I am not saying they are not effective, but the problem is that if you can develop the same qualities using much safer options, so why not do that? If as a coach you do decide that smashing a tire with a sledgehammer will give your fighter an edge, make sure he/she knows how to use the tools before they attempt to do so. Your job is to make sure the sessions are effective and safe and they contribute to your athlete becoming a better fighter, which brings us to point number 2. 
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.

In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!

Do 30 to 60 minutes of a moderate-intensity aerobic activity three or four days per week. Moderate-intensity activities include cycling, jogging, swimming and hitting a punching bag. This will help improve your cardiovascular system, which means more oxygen will be used throughout your body during your big fight. Your heart and lungs will work more efficiently and you will be less tired while you are fighting.


Mixed Martial Arts competitions have changed dramatically since the first Ultimate Fighting Championship in 1993, specifically with the inception of the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. There remains a paucity of data on injuries that occur in MMA, and resulting concerns with regard to MMA's safety remain. A recent systematic review concluded that the injury incidence rate in MMA appears to be greater than in most, if not all, other popular and commonly practiced combat sports.[170]
Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
You’ve probably seen the inspirational video of a guy named Arthur who wasn’t supposed to ever be able to walk again, but after finding DDP Yoga he’s able to run around and do handstands. Granted, Diamond Dallas Page was a pro wrestler and not an mma fighter like some of the faces of other programs we’re featuring, but a lot of pro fighters practice Yoga. When it comes down to it, a little bit of extra mental toughness and flexibility can go a long way. If getting into shape and losing weight are your primary goals, DDP yoga is worth checking out.
Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
To make things simplier, intensity can be categorized into different training zones. In the chart below, training intensity zones are based off of a percentage of an athlete's maximal heart rate OR a percentage of their lactate threshold. Heart rate is well-known to have a linear relationship with exercise intensity, in that when workload or intensity increases, heart rate will also increase to supply the working muscles with blood. 

The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.

×