Shoot-boxing, pioneered and popular in Asia, Russia and Brazil, is the most innovative and cutting edge approach to stand up fighting. It is the stand-up portion of MMA, melding Muay Thai kickboxing’s kicks, knees and elbows with precision boxing and high level wrestling and Judo. It combines traditional stand up strikes with takedown defense, dirty boxing and grappling/ striking combinations into a brutally effective, sophisticated and devastating pattern of attacks, that is totally modern and oriented not for a sport, but for combat. We are the only academy in the NYC area specifically specializing in this innovative style.

Unfortunately, many MMA gyms tend to be unreasonably dangerous. During our 40+ years of testing we have identified a wide range of methods for guarding your safety in training! Even if your goal is MMA Sport Fighting, you want to remain as healthy as possible so you can compete at your full potential! At the Warrior’s Cove, we correct this common mistake of MMA training!


How to: Start off on all fours. Lift your knees off the floor and raise your hips slightly, bracing your core as you do so. That’s the “bear” position! Keeping your shoulders and hips at the same height, step forward with your right foot while reaching forward with your right hand. Repeat on the left side and continue moving forward, building speed as you go. Roaring is optional.

Seyi Oyesola – Oyesola is a Nigerian doctor, best known for creating the “hospital in a box,” a mobile mini-hospital, which is solar powered. Because many underdeveloped nations lack significant medical infrastructure, Oyesola's invention allows for more effective medical aid to be provided for those who may not be able to otherwise access care because of where they live in the world.


Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.
“The instructors are friendly and informative and want you to learn. I think Josh, Andrew, Bob, Juan and Randy have done an excellent job of teaching and taking the time to show us the techniques however many times it takes and to give us one on one demonstrations as well. It’s a safe atmosphere in which to learn and I feel like I’m getting real self-defense training that could be useful in the future.  I am also enjoying the sport of Jiu Jitsu as well as getting back into shape.  I already have recommended the Warrior’s Cove to several people that I work with, as well as friends.  This has truly been a great experience for me, in that I am learning a useful skill and sport while having fun and getting in shape at the same time.   I’ve wrestled and taken Martial Arts before, but this is a realistic mixture of both that I plan on doing for a long time.  I also would like to get back into competition sometime in the future.”
“The best thing about the Cove, is the atmosphere. It’s friendly and cooperative with fantastic instruction from some of the best martial artists in the area. When Mr. Arnebeck demonstrated Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, I was amazed! I outweighed him by 100 pounds, but he tossed me like a rag doll and submitted me with ease. That’s when I realized cross-training is the way to go. You must be able to defend yourself both standing and on the ground. Otherwise, you will have a weakness that can be exploited.”
Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.
I attended the Alan Belcher MMA club in Dlbverville while I was in tech training at Keesler AFB this year. I wanted to find something that kept me engaged and active through all that studying. Never boxed before, these lady and gentleman were patient with me and I grew a love for boxing. I saw results regardless of if I was eating right (If I ate right would have been a lot more) the owner taught many of the classes! Now that I've graduated and went back home I just wanted to give a review to say If you're thinking about trying it you should!
Jeremy Pacatiw has represented the Philippines inside the Brave cage in Brazil, India, Morocco, and Pakistan, and is excited to be coming home, as the world's only truly global mixed martial arts organization lands in Manila: "I learned a lot in this sport. The discipline, attitude, mental toughness, humility. All of those things changed my life. It changed the way I view life and my way of life as well. Now I'm able to support myself, help my parents, buy my own things. I want to inspire others through sport. I want to show the youth that all things are possible. I feel like I need to be a good example for the next generation and I think that starts with respect. ... I always took my losses as a success, because I've learned a lot from them. They give me motivation, they're a stepping stone to my eventual success."
Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
Strikes, takedowns, grappling, submissions. A wide variety of physical capabilities and a diverse range of martial arts skills are required to excel in the sport of MMA. Don't forget the power and the endurance needed to pull off fight-finishing techniques or to last the whole duration of the fight. We are capable of all these movements thanks to our 3 energy systems: aerobic system, anaerobic system and alactic/phosphogen system. The intensity and duration of our movements is what dictates which energy systems are used, and which substrates are used to fuel that energy system. Each energy system takes a different substrate (fuel) to create energy molecules called ATP (energy currency of our body) that is then used to contract our muscles so we can move. As you can imagine, the energy demands of a sprinter and marathoner have completely different energy demands.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional.
What factors go into losing those last five pounds? Could it be the basic items such as sleep, mood levels, or getting the right app? Or is it the high level answers (like gluton, insulin, libido) that can really shave the last few pounds? We called a doctor to join us give us answers in episode 73 of In Fighting Shape. You don't want to miss Dr. Serena Goldstein break it down for you listeners, so tune in for episode 73 now!
Freeze – never end up here… when you are so shocked that you don’t know how to react…. imagine some 6’9″ 300 lbs muscled up bad dude yelling at your face in threatening manner or like standing few inches away from grizzly bear (assuming the bear is behind the zoo cage) but still… your brain will be filled with rush, fear, anxiety, freeze, etc… understand yourself… understand what you are fearful of, why and ways to conquer that. 

Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.
As a general rule, and for all the following programs, don't do the workouts prior to a fight training session. Do them later in the day after ring work, or well before, or on a separate day if possible. Nothing you do should limit your ability to practice the actual technical fighting skills in your sport, in the environment in which you would normally compete.
MMA is legal in Bahrain. Bahrain National MMA Federation (BNMMAF) has been set up under the patronage of Sheikh Khalid bin Hamad Al Khalifa and the jurisdiction of the Sports Minister Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa.[193] The development of MMA in the nation is convened through KHK MMA, which also owns Brave Combat Federation, which is the largest Mixed Martial Arts promotion in the Middle East.[194] Bahrain will be hosting World MMA Amateurs Championship 2017 supported by International Mixed Martial Arts Federation.[195]
“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
Shoot-boxing, pioneered and popular in Asia, Russia and Brazil, is the most innovative and cutting edge approach to stand up fighting. It is the stand-up portion of MMA, melding Muay Thai kickboxing’s kicks, knees and elbows with precision boxing and high level wrestling and Judo. It combines traditional stand up strikes with takedown defense, dirty boxing and grappling/ striking combinations into a brutally effective, sophisticated and devastating pattern of attacks, that is totally modern and oriented not for a sport, but for combat. We are the only academy in the NYC area specifically specializing in this innovative style.
The JetBlue TrueBlue program best serves travelers based in East Coast cities (like Boston, New York City and Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, Florida) who primarily fly domestically and to the Caribbean. Members earn points for every dollar spent on JetBlue flights and JetBlue Vacations packages. You can also earn points on flights booked with seven partner airlines, as well as on hotel stays, car rentals and purchases with retail partners like Amazon and through the ShopTrue retail portal. Earn even more points by staying connected on social media and by making purchases with one of the JetBlue credit cards from MasterCard. You can use those points to cover the cost of future air travel on JetBlue or Hawaiian Airlines, as well as the cost of JetBlue Vacations packages.
Technical decision: in the unified rules of MMA, if a fighter is unable to continue due to an accidental illegal technique late in the fight, a technical decision is rendered by the judges based on who is ahead on the judges' scorecards at that time. In a three-round fight, two rounds must be completed for a technical decision to be awarded and in a five-round fight, three rounds must be completed.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
Brave welterweight champion Jarrah Al-Selawe defends his title for the first time, at Brave 23 vs. Abdoul Abdouraguimov, and even more is on the line still. His coach Samy Aljamal explains: "I truly believe in Al-Selawe's potential to make history for Jordan. He is the man to put the country on the map for MMA fans and I feel like he's already Jordan's best-ever fighter. He will have the opportunity to assert himself and I'm confident he will take it." 'The Jordanian Lion' is undefeated in the Brave cage, but faces the biggest challenge of his career -  The French-Russian ground wizard Abdouraguimov hasn't lost as a professional and is 2-0 at Brave, with dominating victories over Sidney Wheeler and Rodrigo Cavalheiro.
The first state regulated MMA event was held in Biloxi, Mississippi on August 23, 1996 with the sanctioning of IFC's Mayhem in Mississippi[49] show by the Mississippi Athletic Commission under William Lyons. The rules used were an adaptation of the kickboxing rules already accepted by most state athletic commissions. These modified kickboxing rules allowed for take downs and ground fighting and did away with rounds, although they did allow for fighters to be stood up by the referee and restarted if there was no action on the ground. These rules were the first in modern MMA to define fouls, fighting surfaces and the use of the cage.
In the year 2000, MMA play-by-play commentator Stephen Quadros coined the popular phrase lay and pray. This refers to a situation where a wrestler or grappler keeps another fighter pinned or controlled on the mat to avoid a stand up, yet exhibits little urgency to finish the grounded opponent with a knockout or a submission for the majority or entirety of the fight.[130] The implication of "lay and pray" is that after the wrestler/grappler takes the striker down and 'lays' on him to neutralize the opponent's striking weapons, he 'pray's that the referee does not return them to the standing position. This style is considered by many fans as the most boring style of fighting and is highly criticized for intentionally creating non-action, yet it is effective. Some argue that 'lay-and-pray' is justified and that it is the responsibility of the downed fighter to be able to protect himself from this legitimate fighting technique.[130][131][132][133] Many consider Jon Fitch's style to epitomize 'lay and pray'.[134] Former UFC Welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre has been criticized by fans for playing it safe and applying the lay and pray tactic in his fights,[135] as has Bellator MMA Welterweight champion Ben Askren, who justified the tactic, explaining that championship fights are much harder as are five rounds long, compared with the usual three.[136]

Hi my name is Anthony, or better known around these parts as The MMA Guru. I started training Muay Thai in 2013 and fell in love with many other forms of Martial Arts ever since, so much so that I decided to create this website to share my love of the martial arts. This site is a go-to resource for MMA, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu enthusiasts.

Of course, you can fight racism in your everyday life, regardless of what you study. Practice mindfulness, awareness, and kindness. Be aware of your own actions and assumptions. Call out racism when you see it. Protest, volunteer, tutor, donate money to good causes and don't support bad ones. You do not need to pursue a career that is directly related to any of the degrees on this list to fight racism; education for itself is a significant step and noble pursuit. But, if you want to do more still, you can make a career out of fighting racism, and the degrees on this list are some of the best for helping you do just that.


Danny Indio is certified as an Apprentice Instructor in Jeet Kune Do Concepts and Filipino Martial Arts under Sifu Dan Anderson (a student of the famous Guro Dan Inosanto) in New York City. He has trained under many instructors, such as Vitor "Shaolin" Ribeiro and Paul Vunak. He is also a Muay Thai instructor. Indio was a Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructor from 2001-2003. He has over ten years of experience teaching martial arts, and has fought—and won—numerous matches in boxing, grappling tournaments and stick fighting competitions.

Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.
The firm works to challenge a gossip website that shames men accused of non-criminal sexual impropriety, stirring lively debates within the office. Jay is formally rehired by Diane but struggles to reconcile their evidence about Boseman's shooter with the police's suspect profile; he determines that the shooter was Whitehead, the crooked cop who helped frame his friend Craig, and he is arrested. With firms in DC anticipating Colin's election, Lucca begins receiving offers of employment from the capital, including an invitation to work for the Obamas. Diane learns her finances have made a full recovery, in part due to Trump's tax reliefs for the already-wealthy. Diane starts to learn aikido, in an attempt to calm herself. She asks Kurt whether or not he wants a divorce. Kurt tells her that they have never tried properly being married. He is going to get a job with the FBI in Chicago, and he wants to move in together, full-time. Diane is ready to accept this proposal and hugs him enthusiastically. The two kiss, just before Adrian makes a return to the office. He gives a speech about how Reddick, Boseman & Lockhart is a family, and how they all stick up for one another.

The significance of strong investigative journalism and reporting cannot be overlooked. In a time when there is a prevailing sense of skepticism concerning the news media that can be seen on both sides of the political aisle, when the lines between real news and fake news are becoming more and more blurred, and where partisan politics in reporting is standard fare, the need for serious, objective, and critical journalism has rarely been more pertinent.


Muay Thai, a form of martial arts that includes boxing, Muay Boran and kickboxing, is also an important training element. Muay Boran is the ancient art that evolved into modern Muay Thai, with an emphasis on hand-to-hand combat. You will need to learn punching techniques, elbow techniques, kicking skills, as well as knee strikes and foot thrusts. One of the advantages of Muay Thai is that it is fairly simple and straightforward and fairly easy to incorporate into your fights.
Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional.
“The training I have received at the Cove is top notch. Mr. Arnebeck always answers my question no matter what it is. I feel that the training pertains to real life situations that may occur, not just the competition end. I love that I get a well rounded training as well. One day working on my feet the next on the ground. As a wrestler for many years I have been taught many moves on the ground. MMA teaches me a more effective and safer ways to defend myself on the ground. Training with Mr. Arnebeck and his assistant instructors is something that I look forward to every week.”
Determine the striking style you want to learn. If you want to be a well-rounded fighter, you'll want to develop solid punching and kicking skills. The most common stand up disciplines in MMA are Muay Thai kickboxing, boxing, Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. Watch fighters that practice the fighting disciplines that you're interested in to help you decide on what styles you want to pursue.[1]
Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]
How to: Sit on the floor with your legs bent in front of you and feet on the floor. Place your palms on the floor by your sides. Brace your core and bring your butt a few inches off the floor and lift your chest up. Crawl forward, keeping your core tight, and build speed as you become more comfortable with the movement. Give your body a chance to adjust to this exercise — you’ll get the hang of it with some patience and practice!
The new rules included the introduction of weight classes; as knowledge about submissions spread, differences in weight had become a significant factor. There are nine different weight classes in the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. These nine weight classes include flyweight (up to 125 lb / 56.7 kg), bantamweight (up to 135 lb / 61.2 kg), featherweight (up to 145 lb / 65.8 kg), lightweight (up to 155 lb / 70.3 kg), welterweight (up to 170 lb / 77.1 kg), middleweight (up to 185 lb / 83.9 kg), light heavyweight (up to 205 lb / 93.0 kg), heavyweight (up to 265 lb / 120.2 kg), and super heavyweight with no upper weight limit.[53]
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
“This is 70% of the entire plan. I can work out religiously, but if I’m not eating clean, I’m wasting my time. I eat five small meals a day that consist of protein, good carbs, and veggies. No cheat meals except once on Sunday. Here is a sample day of meals (accompanied by one gallon of water per day) that will get me into lean and mean fighting shape.”

“He’s probably the weakest guy that I’m gonna fight out of the guys that I’ve fought before ... we’ll see on March 9th. ... If I want to end the fight in the first, I’ll end the fight in the first. If I want to end the fight in the fifth, I’ll end the fight then. So it’s just whenever I get ready to. ... It really don’t matter who I fight next. ... They wanted me to fight [Stipe Miocic] in January, right after I just lost to DC. So I just told them no, I needed some time off. ... My body, my mind wasn’t quite right. ... If Francis is still at the top or whatever and gets the title shot, after Stipe I will fight Francis again and it will be a better fight than our last performance. ... Like I say all the time, it’s the heavyweight division. It doesn’t matter if the guys a black belt or if he’s a world-class boxer. We still have a 50-50 chance. We’re heavyweights, so it’s just gonna take one punch.” h/t MMA Fighting • Watch interview with Helen Yee
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.

Although MMA training is excellent, it may not prepare you for self defense. As highlighted in our section on violence, a serious predator will not attack you like a fighter. He'll attempt to take you by surprise. Awareness and prevention should be the first part of self defense, but beyond that you need certain skills, techniques, and the ability to use and defend against weapons, many of which are missing from MMA.
Repetitive explosive power is largely a function of the nervous system’s ability to rapidly recruit muscle fibers, the percentage of these fibers that are fast-twitch, and specific elastic properties of the muscles themselves. If you think of muscles as somewhat like rubber bands in their ability to stretch and contract, this last quality refers to how fast the muscles recoil when they are stretched and this is a quality that can be enhanced through training.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.

The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]
Some MMA promotions tend to exist more to build up prospects while others have a good mix of prospects and veterans.[60] Some exist only to be feeder leagues to the bigger promotions (e.g. LFA, CWFC),[61] others exist to try to be the best in the world (e.g. ACB, ONE Championship).[62][63] Some promotions only do four shows a year while others are doing them monthly.
I always recommend some sort of dynamic warm-up/movement prep before starting a strength-training workout. I use this exercise with the majority of my clients, regardless of their profession. My MMA athletes are typically tight in the upper back from the various positions in which they put their bodies. For the "desk jockey" who spends hours a day at a desk, tight upper-back muscles are also common, as sitting for long periods of time wreaks havoc on one’s posture. To help combat poor posture, you need to facilitate thoracic spine extension and rotation with movements like this one.
Along with peanut butter and jelly, mixed martial arts (MMA for short) is proof positive awesome things happen when worlds collide. MMA takes different fighting disciplines — boxing, Jiu-Jitsu, wrestling, you name it — and combines them into an unpredictable combat system. Contenders can mix and match elements from literally any martial art on Earth, and the result is a tough, intense sport and a kick-ass workout.
“This is 70% of the entire plan. I can work out religiously, but if I’m not eating clean, I’m wasting my time. I eat five small meals a day that consist of protein, good carbs, and veggies. No cheat meals except once on Sunday. Here is a sample day of meals (accompanied by one gallon of water per day) that will get me into lean and mean fighting shape.”
Movement training prizes a combination of mindfulness, timing and precision drills that are seemingly arbitrary – like catching wooden sticks or marauding on all-fours like a panther – and seeks to optimize one’s spacial awareness while in a fight. The training is said to help fighters navigate the rigors of combat with a sixth sense – meant distinctly for hyper-alertness – and if seized on properly, can endow an air of supreme of calm. 

There has been a growing awareness of women in mixed martial arts due to popular female fighters and personalities such as Megumi Fujii, Miesha Tate, Cristiane "Cyborg" Santos, Ronda Rousey, Joanna Jędrzejczyk, Holly Holm and Gina Carano among others. Carano became known as "the face of women's MMA" after appearing in a number of EliteXC events. This was furthered by her appearances on MGM Television's 2008 revival of their game show American Gladiators.[citation needed]
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