Food is fuel, period. Feed your body good fuel and it will perform better. Stronger bones, quicker muscle recovery, strength, reduced inflammation, higher energy levels, and many other benefits come from eating healthier. One of the easiest ways to change your eating is to become conscious of everything that goes in your mouth. I’m not a psychologist, but somehow writing it down makes you see the difference between what you thought you were doing and what you were actually doing. Write it down!
Weight training or resistance training used intelligently, can be used to enhance these athletic characteristics. Because all athletes have individual needs, a generic program, like this one below, will need to be modified for the style of fighting, age, goals, facilities available and so on. However, here's a weights program, starting out, that you can use to set yourself up for martial arts competition fighting.
Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
How long have you been grappling? if you are new to it i am willing to be that you are trying to muscle your opponent and expending alot more energy then is needed because everyone does that to start. Is there anyway you can get more time rolling? because that would be your best option as you would improve your cardio and your technique which also helps the gas tank.
MMA fighters train brutally hard to compete in their sport. Their workouts vary widely between working on skill-sets, extreme conditioning, and strength training. Some fighters also learn the hard way that it is possible to over-train for a fight, if you can believe it.  Fighting might come from some of the earliest most instinctual place of human evolution, but modern fighters have taken training and preparation to whole new levels.

Hi, thankyou for writing this blog and gave me a insight on the mma theory as I’ve been studying and training in mma for six months after returning 14 years away and experienced domestic violence from my former husband and couldn’t take the pain let alone allow my demons to control me no more also wished my children to have a better future as they too train with me in taekwondo, Hapkido but I also do cage and muay Thai kickboxing as well. I begun with boxing and weight training in the gym last February and rejoined the mma world where I’ve found myself again but I’m facing one obstacle and I’m too hard on myself when I train. I tend to punish myself if I don’t get a certain technique perfected and I punish myself through more training Til I get it right. My teammates are terrific when they encourage and assure me but I still punish myself as I want it to get all perfected even just once. I know this presents ego behaviour but I want to make myself, my children, my friends, family, teammates, teachers even those I idolise to be proud of me. It has given me great confidence to be stronger and disciplined as well helped with my anger issues. ,

Is it for you? It’s a close-combat system, so if you have issues with personal space or slow reflexes, this will be a particularly bad choice. There are very few kicks involved (most of the time) so if you’re looking to use your legs, you’ll likely be better somewhere else. And many of the forms are extremely tough on the forearms—especially the ones with the wooden dummy—so be prepared to wear a long-sleeved shirt to work for a while. But, if you’re trying to improve your balance and concentration, it’s a great choice.


Wedge one end of a barbell into the corner of a room (the edge of a bench can also be used). You may want to wrap the end of the bar in a towel to prevent slipping or damage to the walls. Place a light weight-plate on the other end of the bar, and grab the bar with your right hand near the edge. Get into a fighting stance, left foot forward (or right foot, if you’re a southpaw) and knees bent. Now bend both your knees and transfer your weight onto your back leg, as if you were crouching down before a jump [1].
Although MMA training is excellent, it may not prepare you for self defense. As highlighted in our section on violence, a serious predator will not attack you like a fighter. He'll attempt to take you by surprise. Awareness and prevention should be the first part of self defense, but beyond that you need certain skills, techniques, and the ability to use and defend against weapons, many of which are missing from MMA.

Boxing is a combat form that is widely used in MMA and is one of the primary striking bases for many fighters.[97] Boxing punches account for the vast majority of strikes during the stand up portion of a bout and also account for the largest number of significant strikes, knock downs and KOs in MMA matches.[98] Several aspects of boxing are extremely valuable such as footwork, combinations, and defensive techniques like slips, head movement and stance (including chin protection and keeping hands up) commonly known as the Guard position.[99] Boxing-based fighters have also been shown to throw and land a higher volume of strikes when compared with other striking bases, at a rate of 3.88 per minute with 9.64 per minute thrown (compared with Muay Thai at 3.46 and 7.50, respectively).[97] Fighters known for using boxing include Cain Velasquez, Nick Diaz, Junior dos Santos, B.J. Penn, Dan Hardy, Shane Carwin and Andrei Arlovski.
Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
Although MMA training is excellent, it may not prepare you for self defense. As highlighted in our section on violence, a serious predator will not attack you like a fighter. He'll attempt to take you by surprise. Awareness and prevention should be the first part of self defense, but beyond that you need certain skills, techniques, and the ability to use and defend against weapons, many of which are missing from MMA.
Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
Ethnic Studies programs are not limited to members of their own ethnic groups, however. White students can and should participate in Ethnic Studies programs as well. This can help participants forge a less ethnocentric understanding of history, avoid repeating the mistakes of their predecessors, and learn how to work in solidarity with members of oppressed minorities.
From The Ground Up™ uses the best of wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, with an emphasis on the “goals” for groundfighting, as opposed to the goals for protracted grappling. Essentially, From The Ground Up™ is the absent modality for self-defense practitioners that do not want a sport based grappling program, while recognizing “the need to get wet, in order to not drown.”
And that’s why MMA Specific Programming and Periodization is so important – because it allows you to train strategically AND synergistically, working the right attributes at the right time, avoiding these major MMA training screw-ups and resulting in consistent gains while completely eliminating excessive soreness, fatigue, overtraining and injury.
During an actual fight, you will be under a tremendous amount of stress. This often causes many people to tense up and actually hold their breath as they are fighting. Breathing is one of the most important and often neglected aspects of real street fighting training. Proper breathing promotes muscular relaxation and increases the speed and efficiency of your compound attack. The rate at which you breath will also determine how quickly your cardiorespiratory system can recover from a real street fight encounter. NOTE: Remember to always exhale when executing a striking tool or technique in a real street fighting situation. 

You’ll also get a taste of their main expertise, MMA and kickboxing, in the MATRX class—a cutting edge routine that incorporates TRX suspension. TRX increases your movement capacity and engages your muscle fibers in a way free weights and machines can’t because it utilizes your own bodyweight from various angles. Your stability, flexibility and endurance are strengthened—and most of all, your mind is engaged.
Sign up for amateur competitions. Make sure to check with the local governing body for fighting sports in your state before you sign up to compete so that you're aware of all rules and regulations. Typically when you're ready to fight, your gym or trainer will help you register for an organized competition. Talk to them and make a decision on which kind of competition or fight you want to compete in.[16]

HBO has one more boxing card on its schedule -- a "World Championship Boxing" doubleheader on Oct. 27 from the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. It is headlined by the vacant middleweight world title fight between Daniel Jacobs and Sergey Derevyanchenko, with junior lightweight world titlist Alberto Machado defending his belt against Yuandale Evans in the co-feature.
As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]
Speed rope training and shadow boxing are staples of a fighter’s workout. They burn an insane amount of calories, tone your entire body, and have you gasping for air in minutes. With minimal equipment needed, they can be done almost anywhere. Incorporate these two classic exercises into your weekly workouts to change up stale routines, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll be able to last a few rounds with one of the greats.
Blocking - your various defensive tools designed to intercept your assailant's oncoming blow during the street fight. Avoid reflexive blinking when a punch or kick is thrown at you during a real street fight. A split-second blink could leave you vulnerable to the opponent's blow. Blinking is a natural reflex. As a matter of fact, the eye blinks every two to ten seconds. However, reflexive eye blinking during a physical attack can be eliminated with proper self-defense training. For example, during sparring and full-contact simulated street fighting sessions, you must make a conscious effort to keep your head forward and your eyes open amid flying blows. This skill, of course, will take time and above all - courage.
Which makes sense, considering how MMA fighters train to survive three five-minute rounds of non-stop, full-body attacks from people who want nothing more than to beat them into submission. To go the distance, they have to be in peak condition: panther-like speed, incredible stamina, and serious strength. Even for those of us with no intention of stepping into the ring, MMA-style training can be a terrific addition to any fitness regime.

Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.
Ross training shows you how to make sandbags, but I have an easier/cheaper way. Just buy a $10 exercise ball and fill it up with water. Submerge to pump, you'll figure it out. I filled mine halfway, about 60#s. You can do Tabata front squats or cleans. They're pretty killer. So much so that I stopped doing them. But maybe you'll have more mental fortitue than I.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
Unable to fight or train intensely for several years, Alice turned to food for comfort. "I'm an emotional eater, so I would drive down the road, stop at Sonic, and grab a double cheeseburger," she says. "I just ate a lot." Her busy schedule, packed with work, travel, and her kids' activities, made getting back into a healthy lifestyle seem all the more daunting. "I like healthy food, but because of the way my schedule was—with my husband working nights and me off work late and caring for the kids—I needed fast and easy," she remarks. "We ate a lot of fast food. I didn't have the time to prep."
The isolation phase is where a practitioner improves the mechanics and qualities of a technique and learns to apply it against an opponent. It can involve a variety of training methods including solo practice in the air or on pads/bags/shields, limited or prearranged drilling with a partner against a prearranged attack or response, and live training within a limited technical context. Isolation phase training is done forever, both to improve the execution of techniques and to increase qualities such as speed, power, and timing.
The style is used by fighters well-versed in submission defense and skilled at takedowns. They take the fight to the ground, maintain a grappling position, and strike until their opponent submits or is knocked out. Although not a traditional style of striking, the effectiveness and reliability of ground-and-pound has made it a popular tactic. It was first demonstrated as an effective technique by Mark Coleman, then popularized by fighters such as Chael Sonnen, Don Frye, Frank Trigg, Jon Jones, Cheick Kongo, Mark Kerr, Frank Shamrock, Tito Ortiz, Matt Hughes, Chris Weidman, and especially Khabib Nurmagomedov.[126]
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
Every training method for self defense is necessarily lacking. The purpose of techniques is to take your opponent out. If you're not doing that in training, something is missing. But since we can't kill or injure our partner each training session, we remove realistic elements. We can remove speed and/or power, lowering intensity to prevent injury, wear protective gear, limit techniques to only those that won't do serious damage, "pull punches", etc.
WARNING: There are no pills or potions and this will take some hard work, so if you’re looking for a magic-fix then you’ve landed on the wrong site. But if you’re looking for a solution to your strength and conditioning needs that’s not only based on science and theory but also tested in the Octagon, then the info you’re about to read may be the most important info you ever read.
Tiffany is an American Muay Thai kickboxer who competes in the bantamweight division. Originally a Shōrin-ryū karate practitioner, van Soest began Muay Thai at the age of eighteen and was both a state and national titlist as an amateur before turning professional in 2011 and winning the WBC Muaythai International Super Bantamweight Championship the following year.

Hope you guys liked Part 2 of this series. If you have any questions, feel free to comment in the Reddit thread, down below, or private message me. I'll be happy to answer any questions regarding the topics I discussed today. In Part 3, I will talk about the strength and power demands of MMA and training methods to develop those attributes. Stay tuned!


Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
Marsden also makes it clear that bodyweight conditioning workouts are every bit as important for MMA training as throwing punches in the ring. "If there's one thing for certain in this sport, it's that your heart rate will change several times over the course of a five-minute round due to the many battle styles a fight can take. It may start as a boxing match, move into Olympic-level wrestling, then return back to the feet," Marsden says. "To train in this manner, take the idea of rep schemes, ball it up and toss it in the trash. There are no reps anymore, just timed rounds."
Despite enormous global progress over the course of the last century, racism persists. While there are large and active initiatives that seek to eliminate racism by spreading awareness through media campaigns, public demonstrations, lobbying, legislation, and more, the issues of racial prejudice, violence, discrimination, and the countless damages they cause for individuals and society continue to be a constant threat to social cohesion and our collective well-being.
Francis used to have his sprinters – some of the most explosive and powerful athletes in the world – perform what he called “tempo runs” on lower intensity training days. These tempo runs generally consisted of short sprints of 12-15 seconds at 75% or less of their maximum speed with about 1 minute or so of rest between sprints.  Even though the short sprint events Francis coached were extremely explosive and anaerobic in nature, he believed these lower intensity aerobic intervals played a key role in building work capacity and improving speed.
Zone 5 often called anaerobic or VO2 max training, is considered true high intensity training. Training in Zone 5 is responsible for increasing an athlete's ability to produce force in a metabolically acidic environment. Paired with the large amounts of perceived exertion, the duration of which this intensity can be held is severly limited compared to lower and moderate intensity training.
×