“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”
Camron, thanks for the message. I would say that the number one priority would be skill development. Drilling, learning the technical aspects of striking and grappling. The S&C simply compliments the skill development, so 2-3 workouts per week is plenty. Stick to learning the basics of squatting, hinging, pushing, pulling and carrying heavy loads. Your success will come from lng term consistency, not short term intensity, so be patient, don’t overdo it and over time you will improve.
“I am very happy with my membership and training.  I have been most impressed by the people there and how friendly, helpful and approachable everyone is.  And this goes from the top down and includes instructors as well as other class members.  Having no prior martial arts training, I was a little concerned when my boyfriend convinced me to join that there would be a lot of hard core, militant types in the class that would be intimidating to a small woman like me.  On the contrary, I’ve found everyone to be friendly and approachable and easy to work with.  I am sure that attitude is instilled from the top down (meaning you) because your class members want to emulate you.  So they take cues from you and when they see that you are respectful of everyone and friendly and approachable in your training style, they act the same way.  So please don’t change a thing about that…because I continue to be impressed every class by how wonderful the people are!”
Because all combat sports require a great deal of aerobic horsepower, improving your VO2 max can make a big difference in your conditioning. Quite simply, more oxygen delivered to working muscles means their endurance will improve because they’ll have to rely less on anaerobic processes for the ATP fuel the need to contract. A stronger heart will deliver more oxygen than a weaker one and developing this type of cardiac strength is an absolute must to have a good VO2 max and good conditioning.
Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
The American Airlines AAdvantage program benefits travelers based in cities throughout the United States, such as New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago and Dallas, who fly to destinations around the world. As an AAdvantage member, you'll earn miles and Elite Qualifying Dollars (EQDs) for every American Airlines, American Eagle and codeshare flight operated by other airlines. You'll also earn award miles and EQDs for flights on Alaska Airlines and affiliated partner carriers through American Airlines' extensive oneworld frequent flyer network, which includes Qantas Airways, British Airways and Qatar Airways. Additionally, members will accrue Elite Qualifying Miles (EQMs) and Elite Qualifying Segments (EQSs) to apply toward achieving elite status. What's more, you can collect miles for everyday purchases if you use any of the Citi / AAdvantage credit cards or AAdvantage Aviator MasterCards. And thanks to American Airlines' relationship with numerous car rental companies, hotel brands and cruise lines, you can also earn AAdvantage miles on a variety of travel expenses. 

Canada formally decriminalized mixed martial arts with a vote on Bill S-209 on June 5, 2013. The bill formally gives provinces the power to create athletic commissions to regulate and sanction professional mixed martial arts bouts.[56] Bill S-209 does not in and of itself make MMA legal across Canada; it allows provinces to make it legal on a province by province basis.[210]
At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon! 

There are two primary training methods in this phase: random flowing and sparring. In random flowing there is a level of cooperation, where practitioners are helping each other to learn with a level of give-and-take. Specific goals may be worked on. In sparring, practitioners are only indirectly helping each other to learn. The focus of sparring is on beating your opponent in live training.
“The instructors are friendly and informative and want you to learn. I think Josh, Andrew, Bob, Juan and Randy have done an excellent job of teaching and taking the time to show us the techniques however many times it takes and to give us one on one demonstrations as well. It’s a safe atmosphere in which to learn and I feel like I’m getting real self-defense training that could be useful in the future.  I am also enjoying the sport of Jiu Jitsu as well as getting back into shape.  I already have recommended the Warrior’s Cove to several people that I work with, as well as friends.  This has truly been a great experience for me, in that I am learning a useful skill and sport while having fun and getting in shape at the same time.   I’ve wrestled and taken Martial Arts before, but this is a realistic mixture of both that I plan on doing for a long time.  I also would like to get back into competition sometime in the future.”
This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.
Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.
“I am very happy with my membership and training.  I have been most impressed by the people there and how friendly, helpful and approachable everyone is.  And this goes from the top down and includes instructors as well as other class members.  Having no prior martial arts training, I was a little concerned when my boyfriend convinced me to join that there would be a lot of hard core, militant types in the class that would be intimidating to a small woman like me.  On the contrary, I’ve found everyone to be friendly and approachable and easy to work with.  I am sure that attitude is instilled from the top down (meaning you) because your class members want to emulate you.  So they take cues from you and when they see that you are respectful of everyone and friendly and approachable in your training style, they act the same way.  So please don’t change a thing about that…because I continue to be impressed every class by how wonderful the people are!”
I would stick to a beginner routine, as the BIGGEST difference in my book between a beginner routine and the more advanced is form. Proper form is critical, as this not only can help prevent injuries, but you actually get more out of your workout with proper form. Additionally, you're giving your central nervous system time to adjust; jumping into a more advanced routine can cause problems.
Seems pretty obvious, but how often do you see trainers who have an ambition to make their fighters the best deadlifters, best sprinters, marathon runners, or even Olympic lifters. The goal is the goal. I know only one example where the gym became a sport and that is CrossFit. If you want to be good in the CrossFit Games, CrossFit training is the way to go, but it doesn’t mean it is a good way to train a fighter. Quite the opposite. To give another example, what works for a powerlifter will not necessarily work for a fighter. Work on the programs with the goal in mind, remember to test and assess your athletes. If you find out that poor mobility is what stops your athlete from increasing strength, address the mobility first before putting more weight on the bar.

When MMA spectators and fans see the effectiveness of mixed martial arts in the ring they instantly assume it's the ideal form of self defense for the street. To the uninitiated, this may seem like an obvious and logical supposition, but in reality it's wrong and can get you into a lot of trouble when faced with a street fight or any other reality based self defense situation. The truth is mixed martial arts are created and designed exclusively for sport competition and not self defense scenarios. I actually wrote a tongue-in-cheek article illustrating the drastic differences between mixed martial arts competition and reality based self defense. (see, sammy franco's open challenge.)
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (India) has not recognized Mixed Martial Arts as a sport in India. But the sport is growing fast and the Sports Ministry has given direct permission to host events to the biggest and oldest MMA Organization in the country - the All India Mixed Martial Arts Association (AIMMAA).[225] AIMMAA is also the sole representative of the Global Mixed Martial Arts Federation in India. 
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