Loughnane agrees that this is vital: "Yoga should be a massive part of training. With how hard we train and how beaten up our bodies get over the years, in later life especially you need to work on flexibility," he says.  "Your muscles get really tight from wrestling and boxing, and it can get quite hard sometimes just getting out of bed in the mornings."
If you are interested in taking one or more classes at the Warrior’s Cove, you may visit to observe the classes. We have a seating area for visitors. You may also participate in one free class – in each program that we offer.  You will find our instructors and the other members to be friendly, informative, and supportive. Simply fill out the GET YOUR FREE TRIAL form above to get started today!
Movement training prizes a combination of mindfulness, timing and precision drills that are seemingly arbitrary – like catching wooden sticks or marauding on all-fours like a panther – and seeks to optimize one’s spacial awareness while in a fight. The training is said to help fighters navigate the rigors of combat with a sixth sense – meant distinctly for hyper-alertness – and if seized on properly, can endow an air of supreme of calm.
The added incline increases the resistance and makes sure you’re recruiting the fast-twitch fibers during the exercise – if they aren’t recruited, their endurance won’t improve. You’ll want to select a resistance that slows the movement down to somewhere between 70-80% of the speed you’d be able to go with no resistance at all. A general rule of thumb is to use somewhere between 20-40% of the maximum resistance, but this really depends on the specific exercise(s) you choose to use for these intervals.
There are still some strength and conditioning coaches out there who train the fighters as if the gym, not the cage, was their main sport. If your athlete gets seriously injured during a conditioning session and you jeopardize his/her career because of it, it means you failed as a trainer. Therefore the selection of exercise and equipment according to athlete’s ability is so important. The gym is not a place to take risks.
In 1980, CV Productions, Inc. created the first regulated MMA league in the United States, called Tough Guy Contest, which was later renamed Battle of the Superfighters. The company sanctioned ten tournaments in Pennsylvania. However, in 1983 the Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill prohibiting the sport.[5][6] In 1993, the Gracie family brought Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, developed in Brazil from the 1920s, to the United States by founding the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) MMA promotion company. The company held an event with almost no rules, mostly due the influence of Art Davie and Rorion Gracie attempting to replicate Vale Tudo fights that existed in Brazil,[4] and would later implement a different set of rules (example: eliminating kicking a grounded opponent), which differed from other leagues which were more in favour of realistic fights.[7]

While mixed martial arts is primarily a male dominated sport, it does have female athletes. Female competition in Japan includes promotions such as the all-female Valkyrie, and JEWELS (formerly known as Smackgirl).[145] However historically there has been only a select few major professional mixed martial arts organizations in the United States that invite women to compete. Among those are Strikeforce, Bellator Fighting Championships, the all female Invicta Fighting Championships, and the now defunct EliteXC.[citation needed]
The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 
In March 1997, the Iowa Athletic Commission officially sanctioned Battlecade Extreme Fighting under a modified form of its existing rules for Shootfighting. These rules created the three 5 minute round, one-minute break format, and mandated shootfighting gloves, as well as weight classes, for the first time. Illegal blows were listed as groin strikes, head butting, biting, eye gouging, hair pulling, striking an opponent with an elbow while the opponent is on the mat, kidney strikes, and striking the back of the head with closed fist. Holding onto the ring or cage for any reason was defined as a foul.[50][51] While there are minor differences between these and the final Unified Rules, notably regarding elbow strikes, the Iowa rules allowed mixed martial arts promoters to conduct essentially modern events legally, anywhere in the state. On March 28, 1997, Extreme Fighting 4 was held under these rules, making it the first show conducted under a version of the modern rules.
Grappling Range - this is the third and final range of unarmed street fighting. Grappling range is divided into two different planes (vertical or horizontal). In the vertical plane, you can generally deliver impact techniques. Some include: elbow and knee strikes, head butts, gouging and crushing tactics, biting and tearing techniques. In the horizontal plane, you are ground fighting with your adversary and can deliver all the previously mentioned techniques, including various submission holds, locks and chokes.
Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 
Diane Lockhart, motivated by the inauguration of Donald Trump, plans for her retirement. Her goddaughter, Maia Rindell, secures an associate position at Diane's firm, having passed the bar examination. Maia accompanies Diane in the latter's final case regarding police brutality, where they meet head-to-head with Adrian Boseman, a name partner of an African-American-owned firm, and Lucca Quinn, Diane's former employee. While the case is still proceeding, Maia's father, Henry Rindell, is arrested for orchestrating an elaborate Ponzi scheme, and due to this, Diane, who is among his investors, finds herself broke and unable to follow through with her retirement, and is also unable to secure or re-secure her job at any firm, with her having already signed an exit agreement with her old firm, and the fact that she invited her colleagues and clients to invest in Henry's fund. To prevent her assets, and consequently, her husband Kurt McVeigh's, from being seized as evidence, she is advised to divorce him, given their separation after the discovery of his affair, but he refuses to file for divorce, still hoping for a reconciliation. Hearing Diane's trouble, Adrian offers her a junior partner position at his firm, which she accepts, and when Maia is fired, in part due to her father's financial scandal, Diane brings her along.
How and when to precisely use the different interval methods described above is a matter of your individual physical abilities, needs, goals, and overall training program. Just as no two athletes are exactly alike in these areas, no one-size-fits-all interval training method or interval training program will ever produce the same results as one that takes these individual factors into account.
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.
However, in the same period of time, America has seen alarming spikes in registered hate groups across the board, especially racially divisive hate groups, such as white nationalist and separatist groups. 2015 was dubbed “The Year of Enormous Rage” by the Washington Post. The values of fascism have been increasingly validated in the public and political spheres.

A well-documented fight between Golden Gloves boxing champion Joey Hadley and Arkansas Karate Champion David Valovich happened on June 22, 1976 at Memphis Blues Baseball Park. The bout had mixed rules: the karateka was allowed to use his fists, feet and knees, while the boxer could only use his fists. Hadley won the fight via knockout on the first round.[35]
It is clear that shadow boxing is important to becoming a mixed martial artist with good boxing skills. But what exactly is shadow boxing? Much like a the traditional martial artist practices kata, shadowboxing is a less scripted, more fluid training technique that entails the fighter rehearsing all aspects of his boxing repertoire as he simulates a fight. Specifically, the fighter imagines an opponent defending and throwing punches and he or she does the same. The beauty of shadow boxing is that it can be done almost anywhere, at any time. The gym, the beach, the hallway at work, the parking lot, and while limited, aspects of shadowboxing can even be done from your seat! Fighters who regularly shadow box have striking that truly looks like art. In fact, one can often tell which fighters have put in the required reps by the shoulder roll (it almost looks as if the fighter is temporarily dislocating their shoulder) apparent while they are shadow boxing. While many mixed martial artists tend to have tight shoulders with little “roll,” watch any professional boxer as they shadow box. The difference will be apparent.
Pittsburgh MMA Training with a technical focus.  We offer classes designed with the beginner in mind as well as expert training for fighters (amatuer and Pro).  Mixed Martial Arts ( MMA ) has become a popular sport in Pittsburgh and has changed the way people see martial arts.  If you are a fan and want to get involved, or, if you are already fighting in MMA then come and see how we are different for the many other gyms in the area.  Get our technical and complete coaching staff, as well as a full team of training partners behind you. See why our team is so successful.
These kickboxing classes at Team Quest Portland are offered at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. The class is typically 1 hour long and involves pad work using focus mitts, Thai pads, kick shields and heavy bags. The kickboxing training program at Team Quest in Portland is designed to teach students striking combos through our numbering system. 
Sign up for amateur competitions. Make sure to check with the local governing body for fighting sports in your state before you sign up to compete so that you're aware of all rules and regulations. Typically when you're ready to fight, your gym or trainer will help you register for an organized competition. Talk to them and make a decision on which kind of competition or fight you want to compete in.[16]
Hey I’m a 19 year old training to become an mma fighter. I dropped out of college to pursue this passion. I still have a job but only work Fri Sat Sun and have the rest of the week to train. I currently do 2 days of strength and conditioning/jiu jitsu, 2 days of jiu jitsu/muay thai and 1 day of just strength and conditioning. So I basically do 2-a-days 4 days a week, but I’m limited to 1 workout Friday because of work. Does this sound like a decent schedule? My coach said I could incorporate sprint training during the dead space between jiu jitsu and muay thai on the days I’m doing those. Would that maybe be too much on top of the stuff I’m already doing? He said because I’m young it’s hard for me to overtrain.
In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.

Fighting professionally for 18 years has made the 40-year-old Jackson smarter about his training. Over time, “Rampage” has learned that he can’t do without basic moves like pushups. He does a ton of them, logging anywhere from 100 to 200 per session in 25-rep installments. Jackson has found them useful for giving him strength towards the end of fights. “It’s really important to lift your own body weight for some reason,” Jackson says. “You want to have that conditioning strength to where you’re strong the whole fight. You don’t just want to be strong in the beginning. You want to be strong even at the end of the fight.”


Steve Bosse and Sean O’Connell may not be champions or top contenders, but there will always be a place for fighters like this in the Octagon, simply because when the cage door closes, they leave nothing up to chance. Their fists and feet – primarily their fists – are how they do their job, and if throwing them for 15 minutes at an opponent is the way to get that job done, they’re going to do it. This was classic brawling won by Bosse, but there were no losers here.
HBO was the gold standard for boxing on television throughout most of its run, often drawing millions of viewers for its bouts. It has so far aired 1,111 fights, beginning with George Foreman's second-round annihilation of Joe Frazier to win the heavyweight world championship in Kingston, Jamaica, in January 1973. It launched the modern pay-per-view era with TVKO -- which later became HBO PPV -- in 1991, when Evander Holyfield retained the undisputed heavyweight title against Foreman during the second act of Big George's career.
The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 
Eat like a modern day Caveman. Try and stick with the basic primitive food groups such as meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, but don’t get neurotic. What I mean by that is, try to be very mindful of what you’re eating, and though you probably don’t need that extra piece of bread, or potato, it won’t be the end of the world if you eat it, and you do only live once. So unless you are training for an event where you have to lose weight, eat clean for the bulk of your meals, but don’t deprive yourself of some of your simple dietary pleasures.
My experience at Warrior’s Cove has been profound. After three and one half years of training, the effects on my life are obvious. My fitness level has increased dramatically. I am much more flexible, have better endurance and health of the cardiovascular system. I also have better posture and have seen great improvements in balance. The most powerful change has been in my mind. The focus that I have acquired through the repetition of movements and the will to improve has been a potent ingredient in my growth. I am able to concentrate and relax under difficult circumstances. This is a great tool for dealing with stress and anxiety. I am more confident but also have better control of my ego. All of these factors have contributed to me making better life choices for health and family.”
Sambo is a Russian martial art, combat sport and self-defense system.[119] It is a mixture of Judo and Freestyle Wrestling using a Keikogi known as Kurtka. Sambo focuses on throwing, takedowns, grappling, and includes submissions from Judo and Catch Wrestling. Sambo also has a modality known as Combat Sambo, which adds punches, kicks, elbows and knees, making it a proto-MMA hybrid fighting style. Sambo is popular in Russia and eastern Europe, where it is taught as a complement to Judo and Wrestling training, Sambo also provides a good base for MMA with all-around skills for combining grappling and striking. Some notable Sambo fighters that transitioned into MMA include: Fedor Emelianenko, Igor Vovchanchyn, Oleg Taktarov and Khabib Nurmagomedov.

“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!” 

Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.
The Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan caters to flyers who frequent various destinations in Alaska, West Coast cities (like Seattle and Portland, Oregon), major transportation hubs (like Atlanta and New York City), as well as destinations in Canada, Mexico and Costa Rica. By joining the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, you can start earning miles on every Alaska Airlines flight you take and eligible flights on Alaska Airlines' 17 partner airlines, including American Airlines, Emirates and British Airways. You can also earn miles by making everyday purchases with the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card or by staying with seven participating hotel partners, including Best Western, InterContinental and Marriott. The miles you earn can be used toward free flights on Alaska Airlines and other participating carriers, partner hotel stays, magazine subscriptions or donations to charity.
“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
Trainer Martin Rooney, according to an article on T-nation.com written by Rooney and Bryan Krahn, advises against spending too much time trying to find the ultimate training program. He sees too many fighters attempting to copy a famous fighter's workout in an attempt to emulate them, doing the latest fitness craze or doing endless circuits until they throw up. In his experience, the top fighters and trainers do low volume work, basic strength training and sprint work along with their technical work. In his mind, the keys to a good program are technical work combined with basic strength training and sprinting while also ensuring you get enough rest.
how long? well ive got about 50 classes under my belt. of that about 40 was pure positional training only; not grappling but holding/passing positions for 2 min rounds eg start in mount/guard/side/knee/bottom and the goal is to maintain and/or submit or if you are on the bottom, reverse and do that as many times within round. its a begginer class pre-req for the advanced program. so with that in mind my technique is far superior than my gas.
Training and strengthening the core especially correlates to the cage when he’s on the ground, according to Jackson. “In Brazilian jujitsu, if somebody is laying on top of you and you got to get up, your core gets tired,” he admitted. “If I haven’t been working on my core, it’s harder to get up off your back because your core fatigues. You get tired and it takes a lot of core to do certain moves and get out of moves. That’s why a strong core is important.” Plus, Jackson says, “I think I read in Men’s Health that if you have [strong] abs, you live longer and stuff.” (He’s right! We did say that.)

And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
Develop your mental game. When you start competing, learn to block out the losses and the wins alike. Always look forward to your next fight, pausing only briefly to consider your victories and your failures in the ring. Dwelling on your past fights is only good for learning what you can do better and how you can improve to increase your chances of being victorious in your next fight.
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).
As a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu brown belt I’d love to spar with you and test how “Spartan” like you really are. Being bold and determined is a cute start but not much of a match for an experienced jiu jitsu competitor. I dig your blog and respect your success but I can’t imagine your particularly good. If you were you’d know about top female BJJ competitors like Hillary Williams who consistently tap out grown ass men (and would make you their bitch) in spectacular fashion. So Clover, look up top female brazilian jiu jitsu black belts (like Hillary Williams) and know that small woman can absolutely defend themselves from attackers, male or female, including someone like Victor. He gets alot of things right but the effectiveness of BJJ for women is not one of them. It will take alot of boldness and determination as well as alot of sweating and drilling but the effectiveness of BJJ for women cannot be understated. The proof is all over youtube. just type in “BJJ girl chokes guy out”
A year after the finale of The Good Wife, an enormous financial scam destroys the reputation of young lawyer Maia and wipes out the savings of her mentor, Diane Lockhart. The two are forced out of Lockhart, Deckler, Gussman, Lee, Lyman, Gilbert-Lurie, Kagan, Tannebaum, & Associates and join Diane's former employee Lucca Quinn at Reddick, Boseman, & Kolstad, a prestigious African American–owned firm making waves by taking on Illinois police brutality cases. In season two, Diane becomes a name partner at the firm, which takes the name Reddick, Boseman & Lockhart.
At Elite MMA, we pride ourselves on offering a comprehensive variety of mixed martial arts classes and work with each student to find the program(s) that fit their needs. Not everyone is looking for the same outcome from joining Elite MMA so our classes allow you to choose the subject that interests you the most, to try something new, or try them all. At Elite MMA, the instructors and staff will work with your unique goals in mind to find the right fit for your needs.
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
UFC Gym lives up to their motto “Train Different” by providing classes that combine strength training with cardiovascular conditioning. Instead of conventional cardio, you’ll push sleds, flip tires, and slam sand bags in their Daily Ultimate Training class. Modeled on high-intensity interval training, these taxing bouts of work and short recovery periods strengthen your cardiovascular capacity and torch calories long after you leave the gym. 
Steve Bosse and Sean O’Connell may not be champions or top contenders, but there will always be a place for fighters like this in the Octagon, simply because when the cage door closes, they leave nothing up to chance. Their fists and feet – primarily their fists – are how they do their job, and if throwing them for 15 minutes at an opponent is the way to get that job done, they’re going to do it. This was classic brawling won by Bosse, but there were no losers here.
FITQUEST combines weightlifting, sprinting, and gymnastics with MMA training movements such as heavy bag training, ground & pound dummy training. FITQUEST says that proficiency is required in each of ten fitness domains: cardiovascular/respiratory endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, agility, balance, coordination, and accuracy. It defines fitness as increased work capacity across all these domains and says its program achieves this by provoking neurologic and hormonal adaptations across all metabolic pathways.

Despite all of this, the situation is not so bleak. There is still plenty of work to be done, and there is still hope to be held. We cannot answer the “why” of racism, but we can offer a suggestion on how to fight back: education. Racism is born from ignorance, and education combats ignorance. With that goal in mind, this article highlight the best college and graduate degrees for fighting racism.

The isolation phase is where a practitioner improves the mechanics and qualities of a technique and learns to apply it against an opponent. It can involve a variety of training methods including solo practice in the air or on pads/bags/shields, limited or prearranged drilling with a partner against a prearranged attack or response, and live training within a limited technical context. Isolation phase training is done forever, both to improve the execution of techniques and to increase qualities such as speed, power, and timing.


During an actual fight, you will be under a tremendous amount of stress. This often causes many people to tense up and actually hold their breath as they are fighting. Breathing is one of the most important and often neglected aspects of real street fighting training. Proper breathing promotes muscular relaxation and increases the speed and efficiency of your compound attack. The rate at which you breath will also determine how quickly your cardiorespiratory system can recover from a real street fight encounter. NOTE: Remember to always exhale when executing a striking tool or technique in a real street fighting situation.
Before I show you any actual fighting techniques, you need a posture or stance that will maximize your offensive techniques and provide defensive protection. In my Contemporary Fighting Arts, I teach my students a broad scope of strategic stances that protect your center line during a street fight. But for purposes of this how to article, I will only address the fighting stance. But, in order to better appreciate the fighting stance you should have a basic understanding of the center line theory. Basically, the center line is an imaginary vertical line that divides your body in half. Located on this line are some of your most vital anatomical targets that you must protect in a street fight. These targets include the eyes, nose, chin, throat, solar plexus and groin. Your center line is best protected by using a fighting stance that strategically position your targets away from direct hits.
As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]
Every combat sport athlete knows just how grueling training in the gym day in and day out can be. Because of this, it’s often important to use training methods that can improve conditioning without putting any additional wear and tear on your body. Made popular by the late Charlie Francis, tempo intervals fit this bill perfectly and are one of the best ways to build aerobic fitness and work capacity at the same time without the added risk of injury and stress that comes along with some of the higher intensity interval methods.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Offering men�s programs, women�s programs and youth programs, from kickboxing and self-defense to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, our selection will fit the needs of beginners to advanced students. Elite MMA schools includes four facilities conveniently located around the greater Houston area and offer weekday, night and weekend classes taught by certified and caring instructors. We offer a complimentary private lesson to potential members and tours of our facilities, come see why Elite MMA is the right school for you.
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