You may be attacked by more than one opponent, thus you need to train for that possibility. While it's extremely difficult to fight multiple opponents with sport based rules, it can be done in a no rules environment, especially where weapons are allowed. A hard finger jab to the eye of one attacker, for example, can put him out of commission while you deal with the second. Training methods where you practice blasting through multiple opponents in order to run or get a better position are also a necessity.
Good job thinking this stuff through and trying to stay healthy. Tues and Thursday off will definitely help, but there are other factors to consider… intensity and volume from other sessions, diet, sleep, stress, etc. I would recommend trying that schedule, eep tabs on the intensity and duration of all your sessions and listen to your body. If you are in tune with your body, then you’ll know when you need a breather. You might also want to look into some recovery software, like Omegawave, if you reallly want to dial things in. Hope it helps and please keep us posted on your progress!

Loughnane agrees that this is vital: "Yoga should be a massive part of training. With how hard we train and how beaten up our bodies get over the years, in later life especially you need to work on flexibility," he says.  "Your muscles get really tight from wrestling and boxing, and it can get quite hard sometimes just getting out of bed in the mornings."
Any recommendations for a twenty five year old female who is barely over five feet tall and ninety five pounds? I’ve gotten up to three hours of kundalini a day and 100 pushups straight, as well as two years wushu, but I’ve been in some seriously bad fights and had the shit kicked out of me. I really don’t want to keep being so damn small and unable to defend myself.

Fit to Fight®’s Hard Ready™ is a unique course, that was designed to address THE single most important, and non-variable component to conflict: Emotional preparedness. Hard Ready™ is very much about addressing our own personal habits and modifying them in small, progressive ways to create a compounding effect concerning overall self-sovereignty. Ultimately, the ability to control ones emotions is the single most important variable in any situation. A strong connection is made between physical exertion, more specially interval training and the demands placed on human beings under heavy levels of stress. The classroom activities of the Hard Ready™ Program are designed to harden emotional resolve but also to address the emotional dynamic that pervades actual altercations. Pre-Emptive Striking is the foundation of the actual “fighting” part of the program, though “support system” lessons delve further into the physical anatomy of fighting. A great focus is also put on the most effective fighting systems including Wrestling, Boxing, Muay Thai and BJJ.


Seems pretty obvious, but how often do you see trainers who have an ambition to make their fighters the best deadlifters, best sprinters, marathon runners, or even Olympic lifters. The goal is the goal. I know only one example where the gym became a sport and that is CrossFit. If you want to be good in the CrossFit Games, CrossFit training is the way to go, but it doesn’t mean it is a good way to train a fighter. Quite the opposite. To give another example, what works for a powerlifter will not necessarily work for a fighter. Work on the programs with the goal in mind, remember to test and assess your athletes. If you find out that poor mobility is what stops your athlete from increasing strength, address the mobility first before putting more weight on the bar.
In many of my self-defense dvds, I have defined a street fight as a spontaneous and violent confrontation between two or more individuals where no rules will apply. A real street fight is not about the boxing ring, rules and regulations or any combat sports competition. It's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from serious bodily injury and possibly death.
Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said. 

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