Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
IMHO Judo is legit for self defence. Hell, I know what’s coming and still it’s disconcerting to see your world spin and end up on your back. Yeah, no striking. Yeah it’s sport orientated (BJJ is at risk of going that way as well). Still, throwing dumb motherfuckers hard on solid ground is a fight stopper. Judoka like to say “nobody hits as hard as the Earth”

Education is the greatest weapon against ignorance. By studying education and becoming an educator, you have the ability to arm the next generation of Americans with knowledge and to instill in them the critical capacities to fight racism themselves. You can help stop the spread of ignorance, and simultaneously, create new allies in the march of progress.
For Regular Dudes: Don't take unnecessary breaks. Do something, anything, to keep you in the game. Sure, life gets busy and priorities sometimes need to change ("I can't change Junior's diaper honey, I gotta train legs tonight."), but you should never have to quit training completely. Have periods where you train less and periods where you train more. But never just do nothing.
Eat like a modern day Caveman. Try and stick with the basic primitive food groups such as meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, but don’t get neurotic. What I mean by that is, try to be very mindful of what you’re eating, and though you probably don’t need that extra piece of bread, or potato, it won’t be the end of the world if you eat it, and you do only live once. So unless you are training for an event where you have to lose weight, eat clean for the bulk of your meals, but don’t deprive yourself of some of your simple dietary pleasures.
NSAC chairman Anthony A. Marnell III: “We will be releasing the Jon Jones tests, but we will not do that until sometime very, very close to the night of the fight. So if you could stop requesting that data from the executive director, it would be helpful because it’s not going to come out until we’re ready to send it out and have all of that properly put together – but it will be published before the fight.” h/t MMAjunkie

Try high-intensity circuit training (HICT). Because much of MMA involves moving quickly and with discipline, HICT can improve your fighting speed while strengthening your muscles. Circuit training involves doing a pattern of exercises in rapid succession for a set number of intervals. You might, for example, include any of the following workouts in your circuit:[3]
Other fighters may use the clinch to push their opponent against the cage or ropes, where they can effectively control their opponent's movement and restrict mobility while striking them with punches to the body or stomps also known as dirty boxing or "Wall and Maul". Randy Couture used his Greco Roman wrestling background to popularize this style en route to six title reigns in the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[142]
To begin, lie on your side and draw your top knee up to 90 degrees using a foam roller or medicine ball. Bring your hands together out in front of you and begin the movement by turning your top hand over and sliding it along the ground, up and over your head. The goal is to keep the back of the hand as close to the ground as possible throughout the entire movement. Once you reach your butt, reverse the movement and slide your hand back around the head to the starting position. Perform eight to 10 circles per side.
Horrible workout. Clearly not designed by someone training ANY martial arts. Too many bodybuilding esque isolation exercises. Waaaaay to much shoulder work especially AFTER benching !! Shrugs ??!?! Most useless exercise in the book? Any MMA fighter should be periodising ther workouts anyway as there's too much to do at once". As your sport requires FULL BODY MOVEMENTS, you should stick to olympic lifts + bench + pull ups + sprints. 

Let’s take a sledgehammer as an example. Who remembers David Faulkner from The Ultimate Fighter U.S. versus U.K., when he missed the tire and instead hit the concrete and his leg with a sledgehammer? Does it mean that sledgehammer exercises are bad? Not at all, it just means he shouldn't have been doing it, as he had no idea how to use the sledgehammer. Sometimes the exercises that look cool are not the best choices. I am not saying they are not effective, but the problem is that if you can develop the same qualities using much safer options, so why not do that? If as a coach you do decide that smashing a tire with a sledgehammer will give your fighter an edge, make sure he/she knows how to use the tools before they attempt to do so. Your job is to make sure the sessions are effective and safe and they contribute to your athlete becoming a better fighter, which brings us to point number 2. 
Almost everyone is familiar with plyometrics and the entire paradigm of plyometric training was designed largely developed to serve this exact purpose. Reactive power intervals are an effective blend of plyometrics and intervals and while most interval methods fall short in improving explosiveness because they are often performed in a constant state of fatigue, reactive power intervals take a unique approach and produce far better results.
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