Boxers undergo some of the most intense training to prepare for just minutes in the ring. Sure, lifting weights and running endless miles will do the trick, but lets be real, nothing feels better than sweating it out like a true badass. Treadmills and stairmasters are child’s play in comparison to banging out a few rounds of speed rope or deadly one-two combinations.
January 17, 2013 saw the announcement that the Brazilian MMA Athletic Commission, or Comissao Atletica Brasileira de MMA (CABMMA), had joined the International MMA Federation. The CABMMA represents state federations across Brazil and is spearheaded by lawyers Giovanni Biscardi and Rafael Favettia, a former Executive Secretary of the Minister of Justice and Interim Minister of Justice.[199] The CABMMA supervised its first event with "UFC on FX 7" on 19 January 2013 at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in São Paulo.[200][201][202]

The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.


Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
Lisa Wheeler is owner of Wheels In Motion Productions and VP of Fitness for Daily Burn. She is an Emmy Nominated Executive Producer, two-time New York Times Best Selling Author and aware wining international presenter. A content creator, trainer of trainers and industry influencer, Lisa is most happy mentoring talent to identify and exceed their potential.
Ever wanted to ask a plastic surgeon..well, anything? On episode 70 of in Fighting Shape Phoenix sits down with Dr. Jonathan Sherwyn, board certified plastic surgeon, and gets all the answers. What's a vampire facial? Does fat freezing really work? What's the difference between a plastic and a cosmetic surgeon? It's better than a free consultation, episode 70 coming at you!

Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!
UFC Gym lives up to their motto “Train Different” by providing classes that combine strength training with cardiovascular conditioning. Instead of conventional cardio, you’ll push sleds, flip tires, and slam sand bags in their Daily Ultimate Training class. Modeled on high-intensity interval training, these taxing bouts of work and short recovery periods strengthen your cardiovascular capacity and torch calories long after you leave the gym. 

The term no holds barred was used originally to describe the wrestling method prevalent in catch wrestling tournaments during the late 19th century wherein no wrestling holds were banned from the competition, regardless of how dangerous they might be. The term was applied to mixed martial arts matches, especially at the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[106]


If a fighter has been doing two workouts per day for a month straight, has poor nutrition, doesn’t sleep much, and is stressed out, the last thing he needs is a ball-busting, crusher workout that is just going to break him down even more. Remember, these guys are punching each other in the face, taking each other down, and tying each other into knots. They are always banged up somewhere.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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