“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”

Submissions are an essential part of many disciplines, most notably Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, judo, Sambo, and shootwrestling. Submission-based styles were popularized in the early UFC events by Royce Gracie and Ken Shamrock, and were the dominant tactic in the early UFCs. Modern proponents of the submission-seeking style, such as Demian Maia and Ronaldo Souza, tend to come from a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu background.[138]
I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.
John Lewis – Lewis is an iconic name in Civil Rights in America. Lewis was a key participant in the Civil Rights movement; he is one of the original Freedom Riders, was one of the “Big Six” Civil Rights leaders, helped organize the March on Washington with Martin Luther King Jr., and was integral to ending segregation in America. Currently, he is the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 5th Congressional District.
Remember, concepts of deliberate practice need to be applied based on the primary purpose of the shadow boxing in that moment. As Davis stated, it is common for boxers to use shadow boxing to warm up and cool down. All mixed martial artists should take a page out of the boxers training regimen by at least embedding this powerful training technique into their daily warm up and cool down. Those that do will take their striking skills to the next level.

If the only boxing you’ve done involved a crate of oranges, you may want to look for a takedown in a fight-wrestling an opponent off his feet and onto the floor so he can’t hit you. “Some guys can get to the legs, but they lack the power to pick an opponent up off his feet to finish the takedown,” says Zach Even-Esh, a strength coach to MMA athletes in Edison, NJ. “To improve speed and strength, try the barbell burpee power clean.”


This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:
Kickboxing classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a mixture of several techniques employed in the rest of the forms of martial arts. Referred to as the “science of 8 limbs” simply because almost all parts of the body are employed during the fight. The forehead, the fists, elbows, knees, and feet are often used as the weapons. It has been around for more than 2000 years and is basically regarded as the oldest variant of martial arts.
I have come a long way since my first week and am now (11-15-04) a 3rd degree white belt on my way to my gold belt. I can’t wait to have enough experience to make it to gold so that I am able to start the submission moves. I already feel so much stronger and well balanced. My asthma has also been tamed to the point where I’m barely using my inhaler. Thanks to Warrior’s Cove I have a new found confidence in myself and the art and I know that I will actually ‘earn’ my way to new ranks. I’d rather be a white belt at Warrior’s Cove than a higher rank anywhere else. Thank you…”

I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.


John Lewis – Lewis is an iconic name in Civil Rights in America. Lewis was a key participant in the Civil Rights movement; he is one of the original Freedom Riders, was one of the “Big Six” Civil Rights leaders, helped organize the March on Washington with Martin Luther King Jr., and was integral to ending segregation in America. Currently, he is the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 5th Congressional District.

WARNING: There are no pills or potions and this will take some hard work, so if you’re looking for a magic-fix then you’ve landed on the wrong site. But if you’re looking for a solution to your strength and conditioning needs that’s not only based on science and theory but also tested in the Octagon, then the info you’re about to read may be the most important info you ever read.


While mixed martial arts was initially practiced almost exclusively by competitive fighters, this is no longer the case. As the sport has become more mainstream and more widely taught, it has become accessible to wider range of practitioners of all ages. Proponents of this sort of training argue that it is safe for anyone, of any age, with varying levels of competitiveness and fitness.[95][96]
Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
The thing is, to stand your ground. Back the fucker off. Make them understand, that they WILL get hurt. Most people who thing that they are bad asses are fucking wimps. I don’t care HOW much muscle a guy has. If you have a walking stick, don’t lash out wildly. Target your strikes. There is a technique in the Philippine stick fighting system called Circular strikes. It allows you to deliver a much harder blow – enough to break bone.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]
Visualize your results while you are working out, and know that they will be accomplished. Visualize each workout before you do it, while you are doing it, and how you did it. Get specific on your visualization during your workouts. Visualize yourself getting stronger with every rep. Visualize and feel your cardio increasing every time you are working out. Vsualize your technique and your power increasing with every punch, kick, pull-up, push-up, etc. Visualize the results you want to get, while you are training.

As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]

Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]
On this very page that you’re reading right now, I’m going to reveal to you the most efficient methods of rapidly increasing your gains in strength, cardio and explosive power for MMA while training only 2 days per week. The very same methods I’ve used with UFC fighters like Claude Patrick. As you can see, they worked for him in his UFC debut (I’m in the background):

We do this through the MMA Base, which consists of boxing, Thai boxing, stand-up wrestling, and Brazilian jiu jitsu. You don't have to become a high level MMA fighter, but you do need to train against completely uncooperative opponents attempting to kick, punch, and wrestle with you. Otherwise, you will not be prepared for it if it happens on the street.
“The atmosphere is the biggest thing that drew me to this place when I first came and visited. The people were respectful and were there to learn. The classes are taught in a way that I find most effective for me to learn by presenting a problem and providing a potential solution to that problem. Also emphasis on position really helps to build a patient mindset that is needed while grappling to help avoid injury to your partner or oneself. All the instruction I have received here at the Cove has been top notch. As far as training partners go all those who train regularly during the day classes (Monday and Wednesday) are great. They all encourage me and help me learn the finer points of the technique that is taught that day. If your goals are self-defense, fitness, competition or just for fun Warrior’s Cove will give you a place to meet those goals. The Cove gives you a great place to learn in a safe environment that encourages learning and hard training that will get you to the goals that you set for yourself. I would recommend Warrior’s Cove to anyone looking for Martial Arts training.”
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