At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon!
During the early 20th century, various mixed-style contests took place throughout Japan, Taiwan, and in the countries of the Four Asian Tigers. In Brazil, there was the sport of Vale Tudo, in which fighters from various styles fought with little to no rules. The Gracie family was known to promote Vale Tudo matches as a way to promote their own Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu style.[4] An early high-profile mixed martial arts bout was Masahiko Kimura vs. Hélio Gracie in 1951, fought between judoka Masahiko Kimura and Brazilian jiu jitsu founder Hélio Gracie in Brazil. In the West, the concept of combining elements of multiple martial arts was popularized by Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do during the late 1960s to early 1970s. A precursor to modern MMA was the 1976 Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki bout, fought between boxer Muhammad Ali and wrestler Antonio Inoki in Japan, where it later inspired the foundation of Pancrase in 1993 and Pride Fighting Championships in 1997.
Pursuing an Ethnic Studies degree will give you insight into the experiences, triumphs, and struggles of minority and ethnic groups in America. They are heavy on history, with a very specific historical focus, analyzing how a particular group got to where it is now, in modern day America. It incorporates a study of the culture's growth and development, and its shifting relationship with the majority population and government. It examines cultural artifacts, such as art, music, and literature, and utilizes philosophy and critical theories.
Submission-Seeking is a reference to the strategy of taking an opponent to the ground using a takedown or throw and then applying a submission hold, forcing the opponent to submit. While grapplers will often work to attain dominant position, some may be more comfortable fighting from other positions. If a grappler finds themselves unable to force a takedown, they may resort to pulling guard, whereby they physically pull their opponent into a dominant position on the ground.[137]
These fighters will often study submission wrestling to avoid being forced into submission should they find themselves on the ground. This style can be deceptively different from traditional kickboxing styles, since sprawl-and-brawlers must adapt their techniques to incorporate takedown and ground fighting defense. A few notable examples are Igor Vovchanchyn, Mirko Filipović, Chuck Liddell, Mark Hunt and more recently Junior dos Santos, Andrei Arlovski.[124] and Joanna Jedrzejczyk.[125]

Is it for you? If you have any dreams of competing, this is a good way to go. Many MMA fighters use Muay Thai as the basis for their striking game and amateur kickboxing matches aren’t hard to come by. If you’re already flexible, you’ll probably have an easier time at the start, especially with the kicks. From a self-defense standpoint, it’s in the middle of the pack in terms of practicality.

May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.


The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]

Every fighter understands the value of explosive power in combat sports and many believe that interval training is a great way to this sought after quality. Although this can certainly be true if the right interval methods are used, many of the most commonly used interval methods – Tabata intervals in particular among them – are not the most effective tools for this specific purpose.


At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon!
The added incline increases the resistance and makes sure you’re recruiting the fast-twitch fibers during the exercise – if they aren’t recruited, their endurance won’t improve. You’ll want to select a resistance that slows the movement down to somewhere between 70-80% of the speed you’d be able to go with no resistance at all. A general rule of thumb is to use somewhere between 20-40% of the maximum resistance, but this really depends on the specific exercise(s) you choose to use for these intervals.
Phoenix welcomes owner of Trooper Fitness Studio, Prince Brathwaite and certified personal trainer and former competitive bodybuilder, Albert Gonzalez to the podcast. In part one of this two part series, the three preach the importance of having a fitness plan and believing in the numbers. With decades of fitness experience between them, Prince and Albert shed light on the importance of rest and recovery, the difference between training for health, sport or ideal body and what the formula is for each. Learn how to set your fitness goals in episode 67 of In Fighting Shape.
You will notice that this workout doesn’t change much from week to week. This is for good reason. Strength is a factor in both endurance and flexibility, and strength is developed, in part, by practice. The popular modern trends of highly variable workouts and “muscle confusion” are inefficient ways of exercising. As we move into different phases you will see new exercises, but for now stick to the workout as written.
As you can see, it differs from the traditional programming. I have decreased the load but increased the time and also allowed for a short break between each repetition. Again, the numbers above are based on experience and they may differ for other athletes. I found this range of time, rest and reps very effective when introducing TUT for the first time. I wouldn't use it more than 2x a year for big exercises like squat and bench press. I haven’t used it for deadlifts and would not recommend doing so, as I personally think it puts too much stress on the back.
Hope you guys liked Part 2 of this series. If you have any questions, feel free to comment in the Reddit thread, down below, or private message me. I'll be happy to answer any questions regarding the topics I discussed today. In Part 3, I will talk about the strength and power demands of MMA and training methods to develop those attributes. Stay tuned!

Zone 5 often called anaerobic or VO2 max training, is considered true high intensity training. Training in Zone 5 is responsible for increasing an athlete's ability to produce force in a metabolically acidic environment. Paired with the large amounts of perceived exertion, the duration of which this intensity can be held is severly limited compared to lower and moderate intensity training. 

The CABMMA first hit international sports headlines when it suspended fighter Rousimar Palhares for prolonging a submission on opponent Mike Pierce, despite him tapping several times, during UFC Fight Night 29 in Barueri, Brazil on 9th Oct 2013.[203][204] The CABMMA was called to preside over another controversial situation involving a Brazilian competitor, when Vitor Belfort's use of Testosterone Replacement Therapy came to light over UFC on FX 8 (May 18, 2013)[205]
You never know what a fighter is truly made of until they hit some adversity. At UFC 205 in November, both welterweight champion Tyron Woodley and Stephen Thompson had to show their true mettle, and each passed their test. In the process, those of us watching from outside the cage got a five round battle worthy of having the name “world championship” attached to it. Sure, the old sports adage is that a draw is like kissing your sister, but neither Woodley or Thompson deserved to lose this one.
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.
There are multiple contrasting studies on whether the addition of more frequent high intensity endurance training yielded any performance improvements. Some researchers found athletes that don't respond well to high volume low-intensity training showed greater improvements when they increased their frequency and volume of high intensity training. However on the contrary, the benefits of performing more high intensity training in already well-trained athletes, are limited.
Much has been said about McGregor’s prowess in the cage, but the UFC featherweight champion claims his competitive edge isn’t just the product of freak talent or gruelling hours spent walloping a heavy bag. Rather, McGregor attributes much of his recent form to movement training – a regimen that champions free-flowing bodily rhythm and a merging of the mental and physical aspects of fighting.
Tuttle Publishing has produced many excellent martial arts books in the past and I'd like to add this book to my list. As the title says it is primarily covers "Mixed Martial Arts Fighting Techniques" plus mentions some self- defense techniques not allowed in MMA contests for use in a bad street or life threatening situations. However, I view the entire book as a self- defense book because what is used for MMA can also be used in most self- defense situations!!!
We emphasize three things: team, community and mixed martial arts, even if you're not in Houston! Everyone at Elite MMA is about growing each day, both inside and outside the school. We strive for success and balance in life, achieving goals in the following areas of life: physical, educational, family, financial, friendship, spiritual, and community. We hope you enjoy the information and make the choice to take action and begin your journey for martial arts in Houston with us. It is when we take action towards a goal, dream, or idea that we begin to reap the abundance life has to offer.�
This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.
“In my opinion, real self-defense is more of a mental match up then a physical size match up. Mr. Arnebeck is a unique teacher. I have found him to be very open minded to new ideas and he realizes the only constant is change. I see him as student as well as a teacher and he is constantly adding to his resume and skills by continuing his education. He has been a student of Rickson Gracie (7th degree black belt BJJ) since 1996, and brings in Rodrigo Vaghi (3rd degree black belt BJJ) and Tom Crone (highest ranking Judo Master In MN) to the Warriors Cove for seminars. Its important to me that he continue to provide me with up to date information.”

Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
Don’t look now, but Jackson and Silva share a similar pushup regimen. But while Jackson knocks them out to improve his strength for the end of fights, Silva includes them in his workouts for a different reason. “To push the guy,” he says. “To create space.” That created space could be crucial for when fighters get tangled up in the cage because that earned distance could be just enough real estate for Silva to throw a heavy blow or strike with his knees.
Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
In his instructional book, Anderson Silva admitted the influence of taekwondo in the formation of his unique style. In each of my fights, I tried to utilize techniques from all the various styles I had studied. I threw taekwondo kicks. I threw Muay Thai knees and elbows, and I used my knowledge of Brazilian jiu-jitsu on the ground.[117] Anthony Pettis has also stated that he is definitely a traditional martial artist first and a mixed martial artist second,[115] as well as his style of attacking is different [because of his] taekwondo background.[118]
In the year 2000, MMA play-by-play commentator Stephen Quadros coined the popular phrase lay and pray. This refers to a situation where a wrestler or grappler keeps another fighter pinned or controlled on the mat to avoid a stand up, yet exhibits little urgency to finish the grounded opponent with a knockout or a submission for the majority or entirety of the fight.[130] The implication of "lay and pray" is that after the wrestler/grappler takes the striker down and 'lays' on him to neutralize the opponent's striking weapons, he 'pray's that the referee does not return them to the standing position. This style is considered by many fans as the most boring style of fighting and is highly criticized for intentionally creating non-action, yet it is effective. Some argue that 'lay-and-pray' is justified and that it is the responsibility of the downed fighter to be able to protect himself from this legitimate fighting technique.[130][131][132][133] Many consider Jon Fitch's style to epitomize 'lay and pray'.[134] Former UFC Welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre has been criticized by fans for playing it safe and applying the lay and pray tactic in his fights,[135] as has Bellator MMA Welterweight champion Ben Askren, who justified the tactic, explaining that championship fights are much harder as are five rounds long, compared with the usual three.[136]

Tuttle Publishing has produced many excellent martial arts books in the past and I'd like to add this book to my list. As the title says it is primarily covers "Mixed Martial Arts Fighting Techniques" plus mentions some self- defense techniques not allowed in MMA contests for use in a bad street or life threatening situations. However, I view the entire book as a self- defense book because what is used for MMA can also be used in most self- defense situations!!!

Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]
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