So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?
WARNING: There are no pills or potions and this will take some hard work, so if you’re looking for a magic-fix then you’ve landed on the wrong site. But if you’re looking for a solution to your strength and conditioning needs that’s not only based on science and theory but also tested in the Octagon, then the info you’re about to read may be the most important info you ever read.
Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.
The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.

This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.


Unfortunately, many MMA gyms tend to be unreasonably dangerous. During our 40+ years of testing we have identified a wide range of methods for guarding your safety in training! Even if your goal is MMA Sport Fighting, you want to remain as healthy as possible so you can compete at your full potential! At the Warrior’s Cove, we correct this common mistake of MMA training!


“I like the format of the classes, and the open gym time afterwards. Everyone has been helpful and approachable, and the atmosphere feels good. For someone who has had no martial arts background, Warrior’s Cove has been a great way to get started. From the moment I walked in, I feel like I’m being encouraged to do my best without being pressured to do more than I am able. In addition to learning self-defense, I have also seen improvements in muscle tone and my heart rate.”

Almost everyone is familiar with plyometrics and the entire paradigm of plyometric training was designed largely developed to serve this exact purpose. Reactive power intervals are an effective blend of plyometrics and intervals and while most interval methods fall short in improving explosiveness because they are often performed in a constant state of fatigue, reactive power intervals take a unique approach and produce far better results.
Work on your strength and conditioning. Even though training and practicing technique is essential, it's also important that you work to improve your strength and endurance. Squats, deadlifts, and bench presses combined with regular sprinting, jump rope, and stretching will make you stronger, quicker, and more flexible. Designate one or two days a week in your training to work on your strength and conditioning along with your technique training.[15]
Search online for classes in your area. Do a search online and look for gyms, dojos, and clubs that offer fighting or martial arts classes in your area. See if you can find general MMA classes that have both striking and grappling included in their curriculum. If a hybrid gym doesn't exist, you may have to go to more than one gym to build both your grappling and striking skills.[3]
The first thing you should always do is start your MMA workout with some shadow boxing. This is done best in front of a mirror so that you can see your style of striking and the improvements you need to make while striking. If you’re new to shadow boxing, a good rule of thumb is to always finish your punching combinations with knees or kicks. If you’re a boxer then don’t worry about knees or kicks, just work on your punching combinations and your flow. Visualize the opponent in front of you and moved to create angles that could be used in a real life situation. Don’t be stagnant with your movement, allow yourself to be comfortable so that you can become more confident with your flow.
Pursuing a degree in history allows you to do just that. History is not just an isolated study of the past. We study the past in order to better understand the present, to see where we have been, how we got here, and to anticipate where we might be going. History is not the plain study of raw facts, but the interpretation of events, of causes and effects, of attitudes and actions, in order to make sense of shifts in civilization over time.
When many MMA fighters train, they keep the length of a standard five minute round in mind by doing circuit training.  MMA fighters need to get used to pushing themselves for five minute periods of time just like rounds in fights.  So, they organize their workouts into five minute periods with short rests in between.  For, example, a fighter might jump rope for five minutes, take 30 seconds to rest, shadow box for five minutes, take 30 seconds of rest, and then run on a treadmill for five more minutes.  This example would help a fighter simulate a three-round fight.
This total-body cardio warm-up takes three minutes—as long as a professional boxing round. Before you get started, practice the boxing stance: Keeping your knees slightly bent and your fists just below your chin, turn your body about forty-five degrees to the right and take a step back with your right foot. (If you’re left-handed, switch sides and put your left foot behind your right.) That’s your starting position.
In July 2013 the Malaysia Mixed Martial Arts Association (MASMMAA) was formally announced as the official national governing body for MMA in Malaysia, ahead of its formation in December 2013. MASMMAA is registered under the Malaysian Sports Development Act 1997 and recognized by the Commissioner of Sports, under the auspices of the office of the Youth & Sports Ministry. The federation comprises representatives of ten states out of fourteen in Malaysia. MASMMAA became affiliated to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation in April 2014.[238][239][240]
Is it for you? It’s a close-combat system, so if you have issues with personal space or slow reflexes, this will be a particularly bad choice. There are very few kicks involved (most of the time) so if you’re looking to use your legs, you’ll likely be better somewhere else. And many of the forms are extremely tough on the forearms—especially the ones with the wooden dummy—so be prepared to wear a long-sleeved shirt to work for a while. But, if you’re trying to improve your balance and concentration, it’s a great choice.
Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
These kickboxing classes at Team Quest Portland are offered at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. The class is typically 1 hour long and involves pad work using focus mitts, Thai pads, kick shields and heavy bags. The kickboxing training program at Team Quest in Portland is designed to teach students striking combos through our numbering system. 

Wushu Sanshou and other Chinese martial arts have also been utilized in MMA. They can be highly effective in competition due to their mixture of striking and takedowns, achieved through a condensation of traditional Chinese martial arts techniques. Most prominent and chief amongst these fighters is Cung Le, who is most notable for his TKO and KO victories over former UFC champions Frank Shamrock (in Strikeforce) and Rich Franklin (at UFC Macau). Other Wushu Sanshou based fighters who have entered MMA include KJ Noons, Pat Barry, Zhang Tiequan[120], Muslim Salihov[121] and Zabit Magomedsharipov.[122]
Try high-intensity circuit training (HICT). Because much of MMA involves moving quickly and with discipline, HICT can improve your fighting speed while strengthening your muscles. Circuit training involves doing a pattern of exercises in rapid succession for a set number of intervals. You might, for example, include any of the following workouts in your circuit:[3]
As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]

“I’ve taken numerous martial arts (and benefited from all of them), but I’ve definitely learned the most from my experience in grappling that I’ve received at the Warrior’s Cove. I’ve always really appreciated the realism our school embraces. The people we tend to attract and who stay with the school, as well as the instructors are the most excellent people I’ve ever trained in martial arts with (double kudos to that end)… I’ve never felt really skilled at a physical activity until I found Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. It capitalizes on my strengths, and with time, I know it will make me a formidable fighter. You don’t have to be strong, fast, or big to become a formidable fighter; that is one of the first things you learn here. You learn how to overcome size, strength and blind aggression with technique. The realism of full-strength grappling (which can be done without the bruising caused by striking) wears you down at first, but you learn how to compensate technique for strength. Being less strong than your opponent becomes less intimidating, and full-strength grappling will feel pretty close to what a real self-defense situation will be like. Being a man of only modest build, I use to wonder what I’d be able to do to defend myself if someone stronger ever attacked me full-out. After near 6 months of training here, I know if I ever have to defend myself or my family from an attacker I will not worry about being tough enough.”
Blocking - your various defensive tools designed to intercept your assailant's oncoming blow during the street fight. Avoid reflexive blinking when a punch or kick is thrown at you during a real street fight. A split-second blink could leave you vulnerable to the opponent's blow. Blinking is a natural reflex. As a matter of fact, the eye blinks every two to ten seconds. However, reflexive eye blinking during a physical attack can be eliminated with proper self-defense training. For example, during sparring and full-contact simulated street fighting sessions, you must make a conscious effort to keep your head forward and your eyes open amid flying blows. This skill, of course, will take time and above all - courage.

Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.


Next, because prolonged anaerobic exercise inherently results in the accumulation of various metabolic byproducts that can actually have a negative effect on endurance, it’s absolutely essential to keep the work intervals very short, generally no more than 5 seconds. Keeping the work interval so short avoids a buildup of these byproducts and ensures the right cellular environment within the working muscles is created for the endurance of the fast-twitch fibers to improve.
Jose Octavio Rivas, Jr. – Rivas is a high school teacher in the Lennox School District of California, teaching STEM classes to a primarily minority student population with a high poverty rate. In his efforts, Rivas has secured over $150,000 in funding, and is focused on helping his students succeed by preparing to become engineers. Rivas was a runner-up for our 2016 Escalante-Gradillas Prize for Best in Education.
The course is a multi-level system that uses inert training weapons, such as SIRT training weapons from Next Level Training, to allow for training in a facility that is not established for live fire. The visual feedback and training weapon features allow for many elements of offensive firearms training to be covered while emphasizing the need for fighting, clinching, wrestling, and retention skills to go along with use of a firearm. 
Zone 3 is called tempo training or intensive endurance training. This zone challenges the upper limits of the aerobic system. Lactate production starts to ramp up at this Zone, however, there is no significant accumulation as intensity is still relatively low and clearance levels are still high due to the adequate of supply of oxygen to the muscles.

Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.

how long? well ive got about 50 classes under my belt. of that about 40 was pure positional training only; not grappling but holding/passing positions for 2 min rounds eg start in mount/guard/side/knee/bottom and the goal is to maintain and/or submit or if you are on the bottom, reverse and do that as many times within round. its a begginer class pre-req for the advanced program. so with that in mind my technique is far superior than my gas.

Unlike other self defense systems, Contemporary Fighting Arts recognizes the distinction between conventional and extreme street fighting situations and I have designed three unique street fighting programs that will give you the knowledge, skill and power to survive a life and death combat situation. These programs include: The Widowmaker Program, Feral Fighting Street Combat and Savage Street Fighting. Click on the links below to learn more about these state-of-the art fighting methods.

There are plenty of variations on the phrase, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” There is good reason for that: it is fundamentally true. Ignorance of history begets further ignorance in the present. Racism, hate, fear, and violence repeat, if not intensify, when we ignore the lessons that history holds for us. If we do not want to repeat the mistakes of our forbears, we must study them and grow from the experience.

Unfortunately, many MMA gyms tend to be unreasonably dangerous. During our 40+ years of testing we have identified a wide range of methods for guarding your safety in training! Even if your goal is MMA Sport Fighting, you want to remain as healthy as possible so you can compete at your full potential! At the Warrior’s Cove, we correct this common mistake of MMA training!
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.
“Research has shown that the highest percentage of a boxer’s power comes from pushing off his back leg when he throws a punch,” says Giles Wiley, C.S.C.S., a strength coach and former Tae Kwon Do champion in Atlantic Beach, Fl. That means a strong blow comes from coordinating an explosive extension of the leg, torso, and arm. “The K.O. wall press drills that motion.”
Place both hands on the ground and jump back into a sprawl or burpee position. When working with my MMA athletes, I cue them to get their hips down quickly and low to the ground. For the general fitness enthusiast, jumping back into a push-up position is another great option. Reverse this movement and as you come up, perform a jump straight up into the air, using your arms to assist in the movement. Immediately drop back down and repeat for the desired number of repetitions.

From The Ground Up™ uses the best of wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, with an emphasis on the “goals” for groundfighting, as opposed to the goals for protracted grappling. Essentially, From The Ground Up™ is the absent modality for self-defense practitioners that do not want a sport based grappling program, while recognizing “the need to get wet, in order to not drown.”
In many of my self-defense dvds, I have defined a street fight as a spontaneous and violent confrontation between two or more individuals where no rules will apply. A real street fight is not about the boxing ring, rules and regulations or any combat sports competition. It's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from serious bodily injury and possibly death.
“If you are a small man or are a woman and want the skills to fight off an attacker, my testimonial is a must read. I’m 5’7″ and weigh 140 pounds. I’m a small guy. In fact, my frame is very similar in size or smaller than many women. The beauty of MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is that size doesn’t matter. I can defend myself in stand up punching and kicking situations, and take the fight to my opponent if needed. I now know that Judo throws and takedowns are easier for a shorter person because your center of gravity is lower and you can get under your opponent easier. If things go to the ground, I can submit or choke out an opponent who has 100+ pound weight advantage. Once on the ground everything equals out, and with training, you have a huge advantage. Your opponent will be a fish out of water. How can this be? MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) aren’t dependent on athleticism, strength or fitness. You use your brain, not brawn, and the laws of physics (leverage) to defeat your opponent.”
We do this through the MMA Base, which consists of boxing, Thai boxing, stand-up wrestling, and Brazilian jiu jitsu. You don't have to become a high level MMA fighter, but you do need to train against completely uncooperative opponents attempting to kick, punch, and wrestle with you. Otherwise, you will not be prepared for it if it happens on the street.
Practice fighting routines. Finally, it's important to practice the techniques and movements you'll utilize during fights. Work with your coach, use boxing bags, perform shadow boxing or have practice matches to perfect your fight technique. Fighters often split their training routines into two workouts per day, allowing them to perform resistance and cardio exercises separate from their fighting routines. Try to practice technical fight training at least three days a week.
Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
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