An English degree means you are adaptable, and are not limited to a single career path. While writing and publishing are direct ways to fight racism, most English majors are not authors. You can become a teacher of literature, writing, or even English as a second language. You can be an advocate, working in charities for underserved populations, and refugee aid programs. You can take your English degree and use it to pursue a law degree, ultimately becoming a civil rights or immigration lawyer.
With a degree in history you can research and write, you can teach and spread your knowledge, raising awareness and giving your students the historical foundation they need to recognize and fight racism. You can pursue a degree in law or enter politics. You can use your knowledge in many facets of life to be mindful and spread awareness through words and actions.
“As the Training Coordinator for the defensive tactics and use of force for our department, I’ve encountered dozens of styles and systems of defense. The simple truth is that in police work, as well as your typical bar fight, the altercation ends up on the ground about 70% of the time. These are FBI statistics that remain constant year after year. To survive and overcome a situation like this, you need training that focuses on simplicity, realism, and proven methods. This is the training you will get at the Warrior’s Cove. The staff is respectful, helpful and eager to see you make progress. Their system of martial arts cross training is by far the most enlightened I’ve come across in my 11 years of law enforcement.”
If the only boxing you’ve done involved a crate of oranges, you may want to look for a takedown in a fight-wrestling an opponent off his feet and onto the floor so he can’t hit you. “Some guys can get to the legs, but they lack the power to pick an opponent up off his feet to finish the takedown,” says Zach Even-Esh, a strength coach to MMA athletes in Edison, NJ. “To improve speed and strength, try the barbell burpee power clean.”
Michelle: I don't actually feel that the "resistance" needed representation on TV. My impression of scripted television is that it's either apolitical or vaguely liberal. We're not writing The Good Fight because there was a hole to fill. Instead, we're mainly following the characters. Diane was established as an ardent liberal when we began The Good Wife in 2009. We knew that she — as well as her colleagues at a Chicago African-American law firm — would have a strong opinion about the current administration.  It felt like a lie not to dramatize that.
The Romanian Mixed Martial Arts Federation (RMMAF) was established in 2012 as a legal non-profit federation under the Ministry of Youth and Sport in Romania. The Federation was formed by the board of MMA organization AGON and backed by a broad representation of the Romanian MMA community, including around twenty MMA clubs and non-profit MMA organizations around the country. Based in Bucharest, Romania AGON club was founded in its present legal form in June 2012, following a long period of time of acting under different other organisations, with Gheorghe Stanciu elected as its president. The RMMAF is affiliated to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF).[250][251][252][253]
Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki took place in Japan in 1976. The classic match-up between professional boxer and professional wrestler turned sour as each fighter refused to engage in the other's style, and after a 15-round stalemate it was declared a draw. Muhammad Ali sustained a substantial amount of damage to his legs, as Antonio Inoki slide-kicked him continuously for the duration of the bout, causing him to be hospitalized for the next three days.[31] The fight played an important role in the history of mixed martial arts.[32] In Japan, the match inspired Inoki's students Masakatsu Funaki and Minoru Suzuki to found Pancrase in 1993, which in turn inspired the foundation of Pride Fighting Championships in 1997. Pride was acquired by its rival Ultimate Fighting Championship in 2007.[33][34]
In 1988 Rick Roufus challenged Changpuek Kiatsongrit to a non-title Muay Thai vs. kickboxing super fight. Rick Roufus was at the time an undefeated Kickboxer and held both the KICK Super Middleweight World title and the PKC Middleweight U.S title. Changpuek Kiatsongrit was finding it increasingly difficult to get fights in Thailand as his weight (70 kg) was not typical for Thailand, where competitive bouts at tend to be at the lower weights. Roufus knocked Changpuek down twice with punches in the first round, breaking Changpuek's jaw, but lost by technical knockout in the fourth round due to the culmination of low kicks to the legs that he was unprepared for. This match was the first popular fight which showcased the power of such low kicks to a predominantly Western audience.[36]
Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!
I have been participating in Easton's BJJ program for over two years, and it has been a consistently positive influence in my life since I began.  I have seen vast improvements in both my fitness level, emotional well-being, and overall discipline in all things that I do.  I truly enjoy both the coaching and the community that are offered at Easton. Highly recommended!
Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows striking and grappling, both standing and on the ground, using techniques from various combat sports and martial arts. The first documented use of the term mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when newfullcontact.com, then one of the largest websites covering the sport, hosted and republished the article.[2] The question of who actually coined the term is subject to debate.[3]

Michelle: I don't actually feel that the "resistance" needed representation on TV. My impression of scripted television is that it's either apolitical or vaguely liberal. We're not writing The Good Fight because there was a hole to fill. Instead, we're mainly following the characters. Diane was established as an ardent liberal when we began The Good Wife in 2009. We knew that she — as well as her colleagues at a Chicago African-American law firm — would have a strong opinion about the current administration.  It felt like a lie not to dramatize that.


“I’ve taken numerous martial arts (and benefited from all of them), but I’ve definitely learned the most from my experience in grappling that I’ve received at the Warrior’s Cove. I’ve always really appreciated the realism our school embraces. The people we tend to attract and who stay with the school, as well as the instructors are the most excellent people I’ve ever trained in martial arts with (double kudos to that end)… I’ve never felt really skilled at a physical activity until I found Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. It capitalizes on my strengths, and with time, I know it will make me a formidable fighter. You don’t have to be strong, fast, or big to become a formidable fighter; that is one of the first things you learn here. You learn how to overcome size, strength and blind aggression with technique. The realism of full-strength grappling (which can be done without the bruising caused by striking) wears you down at first, but you learn how to compensate technique for strength. Being less strong than your opponent becomes less intimidating, and full-strength grappling will feel pretty close to what a real self-defense situation will be like. Being a man of only modest build, I use to wonder what I’d be able to do to defend myself if someone stronger ever attacked me full-out. After near 6 months of training here, I know if I ever have to defend myself or my family from an attacker I will not worry about being tough enough.”
The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
Taking the time to set goals and make a plan is one thing. Applying it, walking it out, and making it happen is another beast. Life will always throw challenges your way. Make sure to take the time to assess “why” you are training so hard, otherwise, little distractions will knock you off course. It may be easy to stay focused if you have a fight schedule, but how consistent are you with nothing set?
There are plenty of variations on the phrase, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” There is good reason for that: it is fundamentally true. Ignorance of history begets further ignorance in the present. Racism, hate, fear, and violence repeat, if not intensify, when we ignore the lessons that history holds for us. If we do not want to repeat the mistakes of our forbears, we must study them and grow from the experience.
The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
×