Whilst training and assessing I look at the load, technique, the number of repetitions, and the speed at which the weight is moved, which is very important. All of the above are always logged for the future information. For example, let’s say that Richie deadlifts 80% of his 1RM x 5, but the bar moves slowly. He struggles with the last 2 reps but manages to complete them with correct technique. I have made a note in his training log, “1x 5 @ 80% 1RM DL.” A couple of sessions later, he repeats exactly the same drill, but this time the bar moves quickly. He doesn’t struggle and there is no decrease in the speed at which he moves the bar. Does it mean he got stronger? Yes, but if I only make a note “[email protected]% 1RM DL” it doesn't tell me that there has been an improvement. I must also note the speed of the bar.

Holding a massive amount of muscle mass can negatively affect endurance, but not always. More often than not, jacked fighters possess poor conditioning due to a combination of poor energy utilization/strategy during fights, and neglecting lower intensity work in the off-season or fight camp. Fighters that put on muscle quickly most likely have focused too much of their time on hypertrophic training methods like heavy squats, deadlifts, presses, etc.
When the UFC was created by Art Davie and Gracie, their intention was to pit fighters from different styles against each other in order to determine the best styles of fighting. It was also designed as a showcase for Gracie's family style of Brazilian jiu jitsu, which Gracie's brother, Royce, used to devastating effect as he submitted all his opponents to win the first UFC. Grappling became one of the key components of MMA training and modern fighters cross-train in striking, wrestling and grappling.
How to: They’re often performed on basketball courts, but these sprints can be done anywhere. Set up six markers, each one six yards apart. Sprint from the first line to the second and touch the line with your hand. Run back and touch the first line, then immediately sprint to the third. Back to the first, then to the fourth. Continue and repeat until you can’t.
If a fighter has been doing two workouts per day for a month straight, has poor nutrition, doesn’t sleep much, and is stressed out, the last thing he needs is a ball-busting, crusher workout that is just going to break him down even more. Remember, these guys are punching each other in the face, taking each other down, and tying each other into knots. They are always banged up somewhere.

Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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