Adrian, Thanks for reaching out. After watching and dealing with full time fighters for many years, I personally think that you are smart for having a full time job. Most of the full time guys struggle with finances and consistency, so youre ahead of the curve. Do you train every evening? What is your current goal? Are you training for a fight or a tournament?
Repetitive explosive power is largely a function of the nervous system’s ability to rapidly recruit muscle fibers, the percentage of these fibers that are fast-twitch, and specific elastic properties of the muscles themselves. If you think of muscles as somewhat like rubber bands in their ability to stretch and contract, this last quality refers to how fast the muscles recoil when they are stretched and this is a quality that can be enhanced through training.
It's not a traditional bodybuilding workout, but MMA fighting works all of the muscle groups in the body. For instance, hitting the heavy bag is equivalent to lifting weights. When your back is against the cage and you're working to get your opponent off you, that's equivalent to doing weighted squats and bench presses. You do training camps to prepare for fights, and that means sticking to your diet religiously and working out hard. It's not an easy lifestyle, but it keeps you fit.
For MMA training, what you are doing looks lovely good. You must be equipped to perform difficult and explosively at height level for brief durations of time. If you are training for beginner MMA, you will have to be training for three minute rounds with a 1 minute relaxation in between, 5 minute rounds for professional. It usually is good to do some ordinary strolling, anything round three miles (half of hour) three days per week to get your baseline cardio up and maintain lung and heart operate healthful. As a comparison, i am 6'three" and 185, so the whole thing I do i've 35lbs much less to move round doing it. With the interval training you are already doing, if you are gassing out in coaching i'd look to dietary changes. Are you consuming heavy dairy earlier than figuring out? Are you consuming lots of simple sugars and white flour? Are you drinking power drinks as an alternative of good ol' water? I suspect getting interested by the fuel you take into your body often is the next discipline to focus on. You need an particularly LEAN (low fat), high-protein diety with lots of elaborate carbs, now not simple carbs. Vegetable fats are just right (nuts, avacados, coconut milk), animal fat are bad (fatty cuts of meet, dairy, eggs). Taking fish oil i shealthy for cardio-pulmanary, and likewise helps your physique metabolize fat effeciently. And lot of spring water. Do not drink distilled water, as it is going to actually leach vitamins and minerals out of your body. Highest admire
Regardless of the exercises you choose, you’ll need to perform 6-8 seconds of maximum intensity work – in other words, be as quick and explosive as you possibly can – followed by at least 90 seconds or more of complete rest.  You should not feel fatigued when using this method as it’s vitally important to use as many of the fast-twitch fibers as possible during each and every rep and fatigue is a clear sign that they are no longer producing force.  Along these lines, make sure to rest at least a full 5 minutes between different exercises when using this interval method for best results.
If you want to learn MMA in Denver and the Front Range, the Easton academies should be your first stop. There’s a reason the pros choose us! We offer the best martial arts training in the area, with experienced, professional instructors who will teach you how to dominate in the cage. Easton MMA is a well-rounded program, which will give you a solid range of techniques.
MMA is a fighting style that requires more than one person to properly train. However, certain warm-ups and practices can be done alone to increase speed and accuracy of technique for fundamental movements, such as shadow boxing, using dummies or punching bags for grappling movements and striking, and practicing footwork. Another core element of MMA is cardio, so that you don't get tired out in the ring.
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
The added incline increases the resistance and makes sure you’re recruiting the fast-twitch fibers during the exercise – if they aren’t recruited, their endurance won’t improve. You’ll want to select a resistance that slows the movement down to somewhere between 70-80% of the speed you’d be able to go with no resistance at all. A general rule of thumb is to use somewhere between 20-40% of the maximum resistance, but this really depends on the specific exercise(s) you choose to use for these intervals.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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