Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (India) has not recognized Mixed Martial Arts as a sport in India. But the sport is growing fast and the Sports Ministry has given direct permission to host events to the biggest and oldest MMA Organization in the country - the All India Mixed Martial Arts Association (AIMMAA).[225] AIMMAA is also the sole representative of the Global Mixed Martial Arts Federation in India. 

You never know what a fighter is truly made of until they hit some adversity. At UFC 205 in November, both welterweight champion Tyron Woodley and Stephen Thompson had to show their true mettle, and each passed their test. In the process, those of us watching from outside the cage got a five round battle worthy of having the name “world championship” attached to it. Sure, the old sports adage is that a draw is like kissing your sister, but neither Woodley or Thompson deserved to lose this one.
You’ve probably seen the inspirational video of a guy named Arthur who wasn’t supposed to ever be able to walk again, but after finding DDP Yoga he’s able to run around and do handstands. Granted, Diamond Dallas Page was a pro wrestler and not an mma fighter like some of the faces of other programs we’re featuring, but a lot of pro fighters practice Yoga. When it comes down to it, a little bit of extra mental toughness and flexibility can go a long way. If getting into shape and losing weight are your primary goals, DDP yoga is worth checking out.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113] 

The techniques trained in combat sports, from boxing to Brazilian jiu jitsu, often aren't optimal for self defense. Of course there are some exceptions. But in boxing for example, punches are thrown with a closed fist. In self defense, without padded gloves, punches lead to broken hands more often than an unconscious opponent. The addition of eye strikes, groin kicks and slaps, hacks, and other techniques considered "dirty tactics" in sports, should be your primary techniques in real self defense.
Capoeira has been incorporated into MMA in more recent years and is often used as an addition to Brazilian jiu-jitsu; both originate from Brazil. Several fighters use this martial art when fighting, although not fully, as music and dancing are major components of the discipline. Conor McGregor incorporated some techniques and has in turn helped Capoeira gain more attention in MMA. It is known for its quick and complex manoeuvres, which use power, speed, and leverage across a wide variety of kicks, spins and techniques.

In April 2000, the California State Athletic Commission voted unanimously in favor of regulations that later became the foundation for the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. However, when the legislation was sent to the California capital in Sacramento for review, it was determined that the sport fell outside the jurisdiction of the CSAC, rendering the vote meaningless.[52]


The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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