Hey I’m a 19 year old training to become an mma fighter. I dropped out of college to pursue this passion. I still have a job but only work Fri Sat Sun and have the rest of the week to train. I currently do 2 days of strength and conditioning/jiu jitsu, 2 days of jiu jitsu/muay thai and 1 day of just strength and conditioning. So I basically do 2-a-days 4 days a week, but I’m limited to 1 workout Friday because of work. Does this sound like a decent schedule? My coach said I could incorporate sprint training during the dead space between jiu jitsu and muay thai on the days I’m doing those. Would that maybe be too much on top of the stuff I’m already doing? He said because I’m young it’s hard for me to overtrain.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
Ross training shows you how to make sandbags, but I have an easier/cheaper way. Just buy a $10 exercise ball and fill it up with water. Submerge to pump, you'll figure it out. I filled mine halfway, about 60#s. You can do Tabata front squats or cleans. They're pretty killer. So much so that I stopped doing them. But maybe you'll have more mental fortitue than I.
The Kickboxing program is incredible at the Easton gym. It's much more than just a full-body workout, it teaches you how to find strength within yourself. I came into the program not realizing what I was getting into. It turns out I was jumping into a passion that I am excited to pursue every single day. Unlike other gyms with weight machines, Easton has classes throughout the day with coaches that are extremely knowledgeable and great at what they do. They push you to perform your best, and you always walk away feeling great. Every member and coach in this gym is fantastic, and it really feels like a family here.

While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

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