“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
“The instructors are friendly and informative and want you to learn. I think Josh, Andrew, Bob, Juan and Randy have done an excellent job of teaching and taking the time to show us the techniques however many times it takes and to give us one on one demonstrations as well. It’s a safe atmosphere in which to learn and I feel like I’m getting real self-defense training that could be useful in the future.  I am also enjoying the sport of Jiu Jitsu as well as getting back into shape.  I already have recommended the Warrior’s Cove to several people that I work with, as well as friends.  This has truly been a great experience for me, in that I am learning a useful skill and sport while having fun and getting in shape at the same time.   I’ve wrestled and taken Martial Arts before, but this is a realistic mixture of both that I plan on doing for a long time.  I also would like to get back into competition sometime in the future.”
Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.
We fight for great public schools, for economic opportunity and security. We fight for healthcare so nobody is one illness away from bankruptcy and for a secure retirement. We fight for our democracy and for a society that is safe, welcoming and sane and that means fighting against hatred and bigotry in all forms. We fight for jobs, justice and freedom for all.

Another obvious area of importance for MMA fighters is strength training.  Unlike body builders, most MMA fighters don’t want to lift weights in a manner that will see them bulk up too much. MMA fighters are more interested in gaining strength in multiple muscle groups while also maintaining flexibility to remain competitive in wrestling and grappling.  Many MMA fighters use very basic exercises like push ups, pull ups, squats and other calisthenics in order to work large muscle groups at the same time.


Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
Your shadow boxing should be set up in rounds with non-stop shadow boxing so that you can establish a good pace, similar to one you would have in a real life fighting situation. You could do two rounds of five minutes each, or if it’s a quick workout one round will be enough to get your body warm and loose. Some fighters find it beneficial to do more rounds and a shorter duration such as 30 seconds – one minute, with a 30 second break in between. Find the style that works best for you and execute. Another great way to warm up before stretching is jumping rope, many professional fighters/boxers swear up and down that jump roping helps establish a good fight flow.

Seems pretty obvious, but how often do you see trainers who have an ambition to make their fighters the best deadlifters, best sprinters, marathon runners, or even Olympic lifters. The goal is the goal. I know only one example where the gym became a sport and that is CrossFit. If you want to be good in the CrossFit Games, CrossFit training is the way to go, but it doesn’t mean it is a good way to train a fighter. Quite the opposite. To give another example, what works for a powerlifter will not necessarily work for a fighter. Work on the programs with the goal in mind, remember to test and assess your athletes. If you find out that poor mobility is what stops your athlete from increasing strength, address the mobility first before putting more weight on the bar.
You have fourteen body weapons or street fighting techniques that you have at your disposal at all times. When properly executed these techniques have the capacity to disable, cripple and even kill your criminal adversary. Keep in mind that whenever you use physical force against another person in a street fight you must be absolutely certain that your actions are legally warranted and justified in the eyes of the law. Therefore, you should have a fundamental understanding of the law so you will know when it's appropriate to use force against another person in a fight. Moreover, you will also need to know how much physical force can be applied in a fight without facing excessive force charges. To learn more about these street fighting techniques see armed to the teeth volume 1 and volume 2.
I attended the Alan Belcher MMA club in Dlbverville while I was in tech training at Keesler AFB this year. I wanted to find something that kept me engaged and active through all that studying. Never boxed before, these lady and gentleman were patient with me and I grew a love for boxing. I saw results regardless of if I was eating right (If I ate right would have been a lot more) the owner taught many of the classes! Now that I've graduated and went back home I just wanted to give a review to say If you're thinking about trying it you should!
“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”
“I am a huge fan of BJJ and MMA so this chance for me to learn what I have seen is very very cool. It is an honor to be taught by you after learning so much about your martial arts history and your practice under Rickson. The Warrior’s Cove is, in my opinion, the only place to go for martial arts training. Everything is very practical due to it being based on real life scenarios. I have learned so much in just the 4 weeks I have been there. I have a very demanding job (Senior Loan Officer) and I am almost always able to work around my schedule because of the class availability. I think whether you are a beginner looking for self defense skills or you want to expand on past martial art experiences, the Warrior’s Cove has what you are looking for. Thank you Dave for everything! I look forward to my future with the Cove and getting a Black Belt from you or Rickson himself!”
If you’ve already got a solid base of training and a relatively high level of fitness, you can immediately begin incorporating higher intensity interval methods into your training. Remember though, you always want to begin by using the lowest amount of volume and intensity that produces results and then increase from there. Start by following the Pro Interval Training program below and get ready to see dramatic fitness and conditioning improvements.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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