Freeze – never end up here… when you are so shocked that you don’t know how to react…. imagine some 6’9″ 300 lbs muscled up bad dude yelling at your face in threatening manner or like standing few inches away from grizzly bear (assuming the bear is behind the zoo cage) but still… your brain will be filled with rush, fear, anxiety, freeze, etc… understand yourself… understand what you are fearful of, why and ways to conquer that. 

For Regular Dudes: Try new things: basic, intelligent training that's tailored to your specific needs – not some celebrity's. That's the smartest option. "I give seminars all over the world, and I always ask the room who has flexibility issues," says Rooney. "Virtually everyone will raise their hand. Next, I ask whoever's working on it (flexibility) to keep your hands up. Maybe one or two are."
How is it that simulating a fight through shadow boxing can lead to more efficient, effective, and faster striking? Well, there is a ton of research on the benefits of deliberate practice for building fluency (i.e. performing automatically, quickly, and accurately) with any skill. Fluency results in relaxation. Relaxation results in effortless speed and power. Consider the 100-meter sprinter. He runs his best time when he’s running hard but relaxed. This relaxed exertion requires the fighter to find the right balance through practice to keep the tension out of his shoulders while directing his energy to strike at the opportune time. Relaxed exertion also positively impacts endurance-capabilities as it allows the fighter to be highly efficient in their striking.
“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
The world went crazy in The Good Fight’s second season, and now, in Season 3, the resistance does. Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) tries to figure out whether you can resist a crazy administration without going crazy yourself, while Adrian Boseman (Delroy Lindo) and Liz Reddick-Lawrence (Audra McDonald) struggle with a new post-factual world where the lawyer who tells the best story triumphs over the lawyer with the best facts. Meanwhile, Lucca Quinn (Cush Jumbo) balances a new baby with a new love, and Maia Rindell (Rose Leslie) finds a new Mephistopheles in Roland Blum (Michael Sheen), a lawyer who is corruption incarnate.
There are still some strength and conditioning coaches out there who train the fighters as if the gym, not the cage, was their main sport. If your athlete gets seriously injured during a conditioning session and you jeopardize his/her career because of it, it means you failed as a trainer. Therefore the selection of exercise and equipment according to athlete’s ability is so important. The gym is not a place to take risks.
Finally, you’ll need to use fairly long rest intervals between each rep, as much 60-90 seconds – you can also use recovery to heart rates of 130-140 if you’re using a heart rate monitor. For the best results, you can perform these intervals twice per week, at least three days apart. The low work: rest ratio, along with the high resistance used, makes these high resistance intervals both unique and effective at improving explosive-endurance.

You will notice that this workout doesn’t change much from week to week. This is for good reason. Strength is a factor in both endurance and flexibility, and strength is developed, in part, by practice. The popular modern trends of highly variable workouts and “muscle confusion” are inefficient ways of exercising. As we move into different phases you will see new exercises, but for now stick to the workout as written.
Do you want to join the ranks of Randy Couture, Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, and Anderson Silva in becoming an Ultimate Fighter? With the proper guidance and background, you can learn to become the kind of well-rounded athletic competitor that the UFC is looking for. Learn to fight, get experience, and figure out how to go pro. See Step 1 for more information.
For the purposes of this article, I am only going to address conventional street fighting techniques and scenarios. So now I'm going to share with you some of the fighting techniques that are taught in my Contemporary Fighting Arts self defense system. These reality based self-defense techniques are strictly designed for real street fights and should not be used in sport oriented training. You can learn more about these street fighting techniques in any of my self defense dvds and books. It's my hope that you can use these helpful guidelines to reduce your chances of criminal victimization and help you win the fight.
When the UFC was created by Art Davie and Gracie, their intention was to pit fighters from different styles against each other in order to determine the best styles of fighting. It was also designed as a showcase for Gracie's family style of Brazilian jiu jitsu, which Gracie's brother, Royce, used to devastating effect as he submitted all his opponents to win the first UFC. Grappling became one of the key components of MMA training and modern fighters cross-train in striking, wrestling and grappling.

The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]


While most fighters use ground-and-pound statically, by way of holding their opponents down and mauling them with short strikes from the top position, a few fighters manage to utilize it dynamically by striking their opponents while changing positions, thus not allowing their opponents to settle once they take them down. Cain Velasquez is one of the most devastating ground strikers in MMA and is known for continuing to strike his opponents on the ground while transitioning between positions.[127] Fedor Emelianenko, considered among the greatest masters of ground-and-pound in MMA history, was the first to demonstrate this dynamic style of striking in transition. He was striking his opponents on the ground while passing guard, or while his opponents were attempting to recover guard.[128][129]
After UFC middleweight champ Robert Whittaker was unable to fight due to a sudden hernia and other medical issues, his opponent Israel Adesanya called for him to be stripped, and Kelvin Gastelum wandered around with his friend flyweight champion Henry Cejudo’s belt and anointed himself champ. Now Adesanya and Gastelum fight for the interim belt at UFC 236 on 4/13, and the champ is taking it in stride: “I think they jumped the queue a little bit and I feel for the other middleweight contenders, the top dudes, but I think it’s good for them to fight it out, to have to have that run before they get a shot at me. I need a little bit of time and they’ve got something to do now. ... A better thing to ask is are Adesanya and Gastelum gonna fight for Cejudo’s belt? [Laughing] Or is it gonna be a new one? Does he give it back? I’m not sure.” h/t MMA Fighting
Also, if it happens that you pushed too hard (which most likely will happen or has already happened to all of us at some point), make a note in the training log and adjust the intensity. The more you know your athlete, the more you can fine-tune the training. This is why I do not believe in six of eight week training camps. To know your athlete well, you need to work with them on a regular basis.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
As boxing continues to evolve in mixed martial arts (MMA), so do the training methods employed. Absent from many MMA gyms is one of the most fundamental techniques used in boxing for more than a century–shadow boxing. If you are a fighter and you want to bring your boxing to the next level quickly, you must consistently incorporate shadow boxing into your training regimen. Below we will provide the rationale along with some basic strategies for getting the most out of your shadow boxing. If you shadow box regularly under the watchful eye of an expert boxing coach, you may want to stop reading here. If not, keep reading!
This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4
I have come a long way since my first week and am now (11-15-04) a 3rd degree white belt on my way to my gold belt. I can’t wait to have enough experience to make it to gold so that I am able to start the submission moves. I already feel so much stronger and well balanced. My asthma has also been tamed to the point where I’m barely using my inhaler. Thanks to Warrior’s Cove I have a new found confidence in myself and the art and I know that I will actually ‘earn’ my way to new ranks. I’d rather be a white belt at Warrior’s Cove than a higher rank anywhere else. Thank you…”
It's not a traditional bodybuilding workout, but MMA fighting works all of the muscle groups in the body. For instance, hitting the heavy bag is equivalent to lifting weights. When your back is against the cage and you're working to get your opponent off you, that's equivalent to doing weighted squats and bench presses. You do training camps to prepare for fights, and that means sticking to your diet religiously and working out hard. It's not an easy lifestyle, but it keeps you fit.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
“To me the Warriors Cove is much more than a martial arts school.  I came to the Warriors Cove 4 years ago.  I was very out of shape and weak.  I struggled at first against bigger and stronger opponents.  But I fell in love with the game, and stuck with it.  MMA, for me is the only physical activity that has ever been able to hold my interest.  I know if it wasn’t for finding the Warriors Cove, I would still be weak and out of shape.”
MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”
Also, keep in mind, we want to do this as a conditioning routine. This is a way to get into fighting shape, but not prepare for a fight. This routine, may or may not be good for an MMA fighter, honestly, I don’t know because I’m not one! What I do know is the following workout(s) are my answer to my own question, how do you develop the conditioning to go 25 minutes in the octagon?  So we develop and we progress.  Start with 3 minute rounds and we’ll work up to the 5.
Foam rollers, massage, ART, sticks, balls, etc. are all amazing tools that will help you reduce soreness, avoid injury, recover quicker, perform at a higher level, and just feel better. These are life savers, so if you don’t use them, start! And if you don’t know how to use them, figure it out quickly, because these will save you from years of unneeded misery.
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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