The first thing you should always do is start your MMA workout with some shadow boxing. This is done best in front of a mirror so that you can see your style of striking and the improvements you need to make while striking. If you’re new to shadow boxing, a good rule of thumb is to always finish your punching combinations with knees or kicks. If you’re a boxer then don’t worry about knees or kicks, just work on your punching combinations and your flow. Visualize the opponent in front of you and moved to create angles that could be used in a real life situation. Don’t be stagnant with your movement, allow yourself to be comfortable so that you can become more confident with your flow.
Place both hands on the ground and jump back into a sprawl or burpee position. When working with my MMA athletes, I cue them to get their hips down quickly and low to the ground. For the general fitness enthusiast, jumping back into a push-up position is another great option. Reverse this movement and as you come up, perform a jump straight up into the air, using your arms to assist in the movement. Immediately drop back down and repeat for the desired number of repetitions.
Seems pretty obvious, but how often do you see trainers who have an ambition to make their fighters the best deadlifters, best sprinters, marathon runners, or even Olympic lifters. The goal is the goal. I know only one example where the gym became a sport and that is CrossFit. If you want to be good in the CrossFit Games, CrossFit training is the way to go, but it doesn’t mean it is a good way to train a fighter. Quite the opposite. To give another example, what works for a powerlifter will not necessarily work for a fighter. Work on the programs with the goal in mind, remember to test and assess your athletes. If you find out that poor mobility is what stops your athlete from increasing strength, address the mobility first before putting more weight on the bar.
Happy New Years from the In Fighting Shape podcast! Have questions on what your New Year's resolution could be? Comedian and actor, Wil Slyvince rejoins the podcast to talk just that and other topics such as began vegan, hanging out with fellow comedians, and his opinions on what's going on. Be a better you, after listening to podcast episode 71 of In Fighting Shape. 
If you find you are overtraining, then cut back on your workouts, starting first with the sprint portions of the cardio, and then with some of the strength training if need be, or take the day off altogether. Once you have recovered begin adding back exercises slowly to find your limit. You may find that your resting heart rate drops over the twelve weeks. This is good, and it’s a sign that your cardio is improving.
Don’t look now, but Jackson and Silva share a similar pushup regimen. But while Jackson knocks them out to improve his strength for the end of fights, Silva includes them in his workouts for a different reason. “To push the guy,” he says. “To create space.” That created space could be crucial for when fighters get tangled up in the cage because that earned distance could be just enough real estate for Silva to throw a heavy blow or strike with his knees.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.

MMA is a raw sport that is evolving into an incredible chess match of mind, body, and will. It is sport and competition in its purest form. It is exciting to watch the sport evolve and is rewarding to help young athletes chase and achieve their dreams. I truly hope that this information helps you get more out of your training and enables you to perform at a higher level.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
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