Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
Fit to Fight®’s Hard Ready™ is a unique course, that was designed to address THE single most important, and non-variable component to conflict: Emotional preparedness. Hard Ready™ is very much about addressing our own personal habits and modifying them in small, progressive ways to create a compounding effect concerning overall self-sovereignty. Ultimately, the ability to control ones emotions is the single most important variable in any situation. A strong connection is made between physical exertion, more specially interval training and the demands placed on human beings under heavy levels of stress. The classroom activities of the Hard Ready™ Program are designed to harden emotional resolve but also to address the emotional dynamic that pervades actual altercations. Pre-Emptive Striking is the foundation of the actual “fighting” part of the program, though “support system” lessons delve further into the physical anatomy of fighting. A great focus is also put on the most effective fighting systems including Wrestling, Boxing, Muay Thai and BJJ.
Each muscle is covered by capillaries that provide it blood and energy. Fighters that neglect endurance work crucial for increasing mitochondria density and capillarization of these muscles will have poor conditioning. Muscle mass and elite level conditioning are not mutually exclusive. Fighters who have focused on increasing muscle mass over the long-term while concurrently using training methods to increase capillarization will achieve the best results.
According to the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts, an MMA competition or exhibition may be held in a ring or a fenced area. The fenced area can be round or have at least six sides. Cages vary: some replace the metal fencing with a net, others have a different shape from an octagon, as the term "the Octagon" is trademarked by the UFC (though the 8-sided shape itself is not trademarked).[93] The fenced area is called a cage generically, or a hexagon, an octagon or an octagon cage, depending on the shape.

Team Quest MMA & Fitness Portland is a world leader in mixed martial arts training and we are experts in boxing classes & boxing training for all skill levels. No matter if you are a beginner or pro, our boxing program at Team Quest MMA will challenge you, help you lose weight, get in shape fast and learn realistic boxing with fast paced drills and awesome work out partners. 

Bring a training partner with you to practice and spar. Having a training partner, preferably another MMA fighter, can provide a source of motivation to work out every day. If you want to practice sparring, you could also do so with your partner. If you know any other martial arts students or have an athletic friend, ask them to train with you at least once or twice a week to reap the benefits of a partner.[5]


Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.
If the only boxing you’ve done involved a crate of oranges, you may want to look for a takedown in a fight-wrestling an opponent off his feet and onto the floor so he can’t hit you. “Some guys can get to the legs, but they lack the power to pick an opponent up off his feet to finish the takedown,” says Zach Even-Esh, a strength coach to MMA athletes in Edison, NJ. “To improve speed and strength, try the barbell burpee power clean.”
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.

Shadow boxing is an essential practice for both MMA combatants and boxers. I make all the fighters I train shadow box at least 4 rounds as a warm up, with a mix of bag work, head movement drills and lastly focus mitts or pads and then back to shadowing a round or two as a cool down. I've noticed Shadow boxing in MMA for some it isn't used as much as it should be. I've even asked some of the fighters why they don't and most say they'd rather not waste their energy hitting nothing and would rather use that energy on the bag, mitts etc. but shadowing is an art and a major tool that should be used by every combatant. For whatever reason, the guys that don't I feel is the result of a lack of creative thinking.
With a degree in history you can research and write, you can teach and spread your knowledge, raising awareness and giving your students the historical foundation they need to recognize and fight racism. You can pursue a degree in law or enter politics. You can use your knowledge in many facets of life to be mindful and spread awareness through words and actions.
Muay Thai is the kickboxing style most commonly used in professional Mixed Martial Arts (UFC) style competitions. It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because it allows use of punches, kicks, elbows, and knees—making it the most versatile and effective striking system on the planet. Even better, it is a great workout and not boring—this motivates people who normally hate going to the gym and gets them working out!
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
Jeremy Pacatiw has represented the Philippines inside the Brave cage in Brazil, India, Morocco, and Pakistan, and is excited to be coming home, as the world's only truly global mixed martial arts organization lands in Manila: "I learned a lot in this sport. The discipline, attitude, mental toughness, humility. All of those things changed my life. It changed the way I view life and my way of life as well. Now I'm able to support myself, help my parents, buy my own things. I want to inspire others through sport. I want to show the youth that all things are possible. I feel like I need to be a good example for the next generation and I think that starts with respect. ... I always took my losses as a success, because I've learned a lot from them. They give me motivation, they're a stepping stone to my eventual success."
Knowledge defeats ignorance, and philosophy is the area of study for those who love the pursuit of knowledge. Philosophy requires us to ask complex questions, questions whose answers can provide us with a better understanding of our world and ourselves. The knowledge gained in this pursuit, in turn, allows us to better understand issues like racism.

Marsden also makes it clear that bodyweight conditioning workouts are every bit as important for MMA training as throwing punches in the ring. “If there’s one thing for certain in this sport, it’s that your heart rate will change several times over the course of a five-minute round due to the many battle styles a fight can take. It may start as a boxing match, move into Olympic-level wrestling, then return back to the feet,” Marsden says.
The reason why we use the wording “Lead” and “Rear” instead of “Left” and “Right” is because when switching stances this can get confusing. Someone who is trying to master all styles of fighting should be able to fight in both Orthodox (Left foot first) and Southpaw (Right foot first). This is obviously better suited for MMA because it gives your opponent a different look for takedowns, while in boxing you’re only using punches and most boxers preferably only master one stance.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
How and when to precisely use the different interval methods described above is a matter of your individual physical abilities, needs, goals, and overall training program. Just as no two athletes are exactly alike in these areas, no one-size-fits-all interval training method or interval training program will ever produce the same results as one that takes these individual factors into account.
This total-body cardio warm-up takes three minutes—as long as a professional boxing round. Before you get started, practice the boxing stance: Keeping your knees slightly bent and your fists just below your chin, turn your body about forty-five degrees to the right and take a step back with your right foot. (If you’re left-handed, switch sides and put your left foot behind your right.) That’s your starting position.
What’s best is all of these exercises are basic. The volume of reps attached to them, however… well, good luck with them, because you might have to tap out before you can finish. With that in mind, be sure to adjust the workouts to your own fitness level. Push yourself, but don't overextend and put yourself in danger. Work up to the full number of reps over time.
Of his diet, McGregor has revealed previously that he tends to avoid carbohydrates. “I eat good meat - chicken, salmon, some steak - and a lot of quality greens and some fruits like bananas... Getting enough protein is important when I train, to help build muscle and recover, so I’ll supplement with protein shakes. I drink mostly water or coconut water. It’s important to stay hydrated - first thing I do in the morning is stretch and drink water. ”
The second, 5-minute round is similar in function to the first, but focused solely on kneeing and kicking movements instead of boxing. "I kick low, high, and mid-range, and often double-up my kicks—meaning I throw a left kick, left kick, one after the other as fast as possible," Camozzi says. "I also mix up high and low. I might throw a low left kick immediately followed by a high right kick." The point is to keep the pace fast and high-volume for the entire 5-minute round, but you're welcome to get creative as you go.
Another Chicago lawyer is murdered, causing tensions at Reddick Boseman. Liz has her first day at Reddick, Boseman & Lockhart and goes for a drink with Diane, where Diane confides that she feels as if she is going insane with all the problems of the world. Maia's trial takes an unwelcome turn when a surprise witness is called to testify against her. Lucca and Colin go head-to-head in court in the Rindell trial.
Bruce is learning mixed martial arts, the fast-growing combat sport popularized by the Ultimate Fighting Championship. In the UFC, two fighters square off inside a cage, attempting to harm each other with a mix of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, wrestling, boxing and other fighting styles. Victory is often decided by a brutal knockout or a suffocating chokehold.
You will notice that this workout doesn’t change much from week to week. This is for good reason. Strength is a factor in both endurance and flexibility, and strength is developed, in part, by practice. The popular modern trends of highly variable workouts and “muscle confusion” are inefficient ways of exercising. As we move into different phases you will see new exercises, but for now stick to the workout as written.
I don’t mark the rest periods in between sets or exercises. Rest as long as you need and approach each set as recovered as possible. Avoid failure. You should stop each set before you can’t lift any more, and rest longer if you need to so that you can follow along with the workout. The recommended starting weights assume familiarity with the exercises. If you are new to a program like this or are detrained, add a few reps to each rep max recommendation. For example, where it says “3 x 5 with your 8-rep max” instead, do 3 x 5 with your 10- or 11-rep max instead, as the work out will rapidly become too difficult to do with your 8-rep max.
That’s why Silva swears by neck ups. To perform the move, grab a weight bench and lay on your back so your head is hanging off of it. Then, use your neck to raise your head up until your chin touches his chest, pausing to squeeze the muscles. Then, lay face down and repeat for another 25 reps, this time lifting your neck up as high as possible. Lay on your left shoulder and repeat, then for your right shoulder.

Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
Learn martial arts. When you're first trying to get into MMA, it'll help if you've got some experience (even at the beginner level) with basic mat wrestling and some variety of martial art. You can jump right in and start learning MMA basics, but being a well-rounded fighter who's able to take the fight to the ground as well as out-box your opponent is the difference between being a great fighter and a mediocre one.[2] The best martial arts to familiarize yourself with for MMA include:
Note that this workout is very simple. For example, you might ask, “Only three sets of pressing for the first workout?” Yes. Do not do more than mentioned. Sometimes volume is low to allow you to adjust to the new program or to allow for strategic deconditioning. Also, combat athletes are among the most prone to overtraining, especially if they are training in their skilled disciplines three or more times per week. Given that scenario, this workout will be perfectly adequate for results.

Combat Strategies, Tactics and Techniques is a section of combat that I always preach that should be explored more by MMA fighters. Unfortunately it is not especially in the detail I am discussing in these videos. Combat strategies consists of understanding psychological preferences a fighter may rely on as a means for survival, a.k.a. “archetypes”. There are five types of archetypes that all fighters can be classified into. Combat Strategies also focuses on style specific strategies, body type strategies. attribute specific strategies and more. Tactics and techniques are general strategies used against general techniques. Where example general strategies to deal with the kick maybe at long range, or general strategy how to fight a grappler, Percision boxer as some examples. Also there are positional response trigger strategies And adren Rush strategies . There is much more to Combat then just studying boxing striking and submission grappling. This is very broad and complex section of interpersonal combat, and must be learned if one is planning on getting to a well rounded level.

The first state regulated MMA event was held in Biloxi, Mississippi on August 23, 1996 with the sanctioning of IFC's Mayhem in Mississippi[49] show by the Mississippi Athletic Commission under William Lyons. The rules used were an adaptation of the kickboxing rules already accepted by most state athletic commissions. These modified kickboxing rules allowed for take downs and ground fighting and did away with rounds, although they did allow for fighters to be stood up by the referee and restarted if there was no action on the ground. These rules were the first in modern MMA to define fouls, fighting surfaces and the use of the cage.


Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
Just as the name implies, these intervals are designed to push your cardiovascular system to its limits and improve VO2 max – the maximum amount of oxygen your system is capable of delivering to your working muscles. These intervals are designed to strengthen the most important muscle in your body, your heart, and are as grueling as they are effective at doing so.

Is it for you? It’s a close-combat system, so if you have issues with personal space or slow reflexes, this will be a particularly bad choice. There are very few kicks involved (most of the time) so if you’re looking to use your legs, you’ll likely be better somewhere else. And many of the forms are extremely tough on the forearms—especially the ones with the wooden dummy—so be prepared to wear a long-sleeved shirt to work for a while. But, if you’re trying to improve your balance and concentration, it’s a great choice.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.

Food is fuel, period. Feed your body good fuel and it will perform better. Stronger bones, quicker muscle recovery, strength, reduced inflammation, higher energy levels, and many other benefits come from eating healthier. One of the easiest ways to change your eating is to become conscious of everything that goes in your mouth. I’m not a psychologist, but somehow writing it down makes you see the difference between what you thought you were doing and what you were actually doing. Write it down!
Happy Monday! Episode 74 here to make it a little better for you. Phoenix is joined by Prince "Trooper" Brathwaite. Prince is in the Daily Burn network and owner of Trooper Fitness. He is big on mental strength just as much as he is in physical. He'll share his trooper mentality, thoughts on how to make HIIT better, and answer some questions from the Daily Burn community. All in all, sit back, relax, and just soak in the knowledge Phoenix and Prince share on episode 74.
The Delta SkyMiles program is convenient for frequent flyers based in United States cities like Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and Seattle, and for passengers who often travel to and from New York City. Delta Air Lines operates more than 15,000 flights each day to 1,000-plus destinations across more than 50 countries. By becoming a SkyMiles member, you'll earn miles based on the amount you pay for your flight with Delta, Delta Connection or Delta Shuttle; you can also earn miles for flying with any of Delta's multiple partner airlines, including KLM, Air France and Virgin Atlantic, among others. Those miles can be redeemed for free air travel on any participating airline or cashed in for cabin upgrades, unique experiences (such as concert tickets) or items for sale at the SkyMiles Marketplace. When you fly with Delta, you will also earn Medallion Qualification Miles, Medallion Qualification Segments and Medallion Qualification Dollars, which will help you gain access to a variety of perks through the Delta SkyMiles Medallion elite membership program. You can also earn miles on everyday purchases if you've signed up for a Delta SkyMiles credit card by American Express.
Jordan Beckwith, 27, was 13 when she shattered her ankle in a horse riding accent. After an endless series of surgeries, she was finally faced with a risky ankle replacement or amputation. "I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t do my job, I couldn’t even take my dogs for a two-minute walk. I couldn’t do jiu-jitsu. I was icing my ankle every night. I didn’t want to live like that anymore. ... It would help me walk and maybe run, I could participate in sports again." On 10/11/18 she wrote her foot a breakup letter, on her foot - "It’s not me, it’s you. I’m sure we’ve had some good times together, but it’s time we parted ways. I wish you all the best. Your blood supplier." And that was the end of that. h/t Metro • Subscribe to the Footless Youtube channel
Clinch-Fighting is a tactic consisting of using a clinch hold to prevent the opponent from moving away into more distant striking range, while also attempting takedowns and striking the opponent using knees, stomps, elbows, and punches. The clinch is often utilized by wrestlers and Judokas that have added components of the striking game (typically boxing), and Muay Thai fighters.
SPARology™ uses unique and cutting edge methodology that teaches School Owners, Instructors and Coaches how to design and implement safe, fun and effective sparring/fighting in a structured, step-by-step protocol. To become competent at sparring/fighting, students need to spend time actually sparring. However, when real contact begins, the attrition rate for school and gyms nation wide is around 80%. With that problem in mind, SPARology™ structures classes in a “scaffolded” fashion - a way that limits the level of contact and progressively adds more resistance as the athlete starts to develop targeted skill sets. By this method, students have time to develop with confidence and reduced frustration.
Perform sport-specific, strength-training moves using body-weight exercises. MMA coach Doug Balzarini recommends integrating movements -- such as the sit-out, bear crawl, sprawl and complex inchworm -- to prepare for a fight. Each of these movements improves balance while working core, upper and lower-body muscle groups. Include these exercises with your resistance-training workouts, performing three to four sets of 10 to 12 reps each.

Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
[…] Obviously having the ability to protect yourself and knowing that you’re in shape and capable of taking somebody on when it comes to the mats would be enough to give anybody self-confidence, even if you don’t plan on using that new found strength and focus on anybody in particular. Don’t be fooled into thinking that reaching a point where you can call yourself an MMA athlete will come easy, because the work is grueling and it takes both physical and mental stability to make it through the intensity of both the workouts and the matches necessary to become adept, but the self-confidence will grow as you do. Boldanddetermined.com explains: […]

The reason why we use the wording “Lead” and “Rear” instead of “Left” and “Right” is because when switching stances this can get confusing. Someone who is trying to master all styles of fighting should be able to fight in both Orthodox (Left foot first) and Southpaw (Right foot first). This is obviously better suited for MMA because it gives your opponent a different look for takedowns, while in boxing you’re only using punches and most boxers preferably only master one stance.

The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]
Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
Next, because prolonged anaerobic exercise inherently results in the accumulation of various metabolic byproducts that can actually have a negative effect on endurance, it’s absolutely essential to keep the work intervals very short, generally no more than 5 seconds. Keeping the work interval so short avoids a buildup of these byproducts and ensures the right cellular environment within the working muscles is created for the endurance of the fast-twitch fibers to improve.
“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”
The second, 5-minute round is similar in function to the first, but focused solely on kneeing and kicking movements instead of boxing. "I kick low, high, and mid-range, and often double-up my kicks—meaning I throw a left kick, left kick, one after the other as fast as possible," Camozzi says. "I also mix up high and low. I might throw a low left kick immediately followed by a high right kick." The point is to keep the pace fast and high-volume for the entire 5-minute round, but you're welcome to get creative as you go.
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