The Fit to Fight® Force Options Group training, for law enforcement and military personnel, ascribes to the notion that, irrespective of the context, fundamental combat skills are a must for physical altercations. While some special sensibilities and tactics are dealt with in the overarching structure of our force training progressions, much of training is rooted in learning to read, appreciate and respond to actual energies that are manifest in any and all situations that entail interpersonal human aggression. Fit to Fight® Force Options Group also delves heavily into the stressors that accompany said situations, their emotional and physical byproducts and methods for dealing most effectively with them.

What to expect: There’s a lot of visualization to be done when it comes to Wing Chun. In order to keep the body in balance, it teaches the idea of a center line in the body, which guides every action. The attacks consist mostly of rapid strikes performed while moving forward, into the opponent. The stance is also different from other martial arts, so be prepared to be sore in odd places.


Eat like a modern day Caveman. Try and stick with the basic primitive food groups such as meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, but don’t get neurotic. What I mean by that is, try to be very mindful of what you’re eating, and though you probably don’t need that extra piece of bread, or potato, it won’t be the end of the world if you eat it, and you do only live once. So unless you are training for an event where you have to lose weight, eat clean for the bulk of your meals, but don’t deprive yourself of some of your simple dietary pleasures.


Unfortunately, many MMA gyms tend to be unreasonably dangerous. During our 40+ years of testing we have identified a wide range of methods for guarding your safety in training! Even if your goal is MMA Sport Fighting, you want to remain as healthy as possible so you can compete at your full potential! At the Warrior’s Cove, we correct this common mistake of MMA training!

3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.
wocyru01.. its pain that I get in the shins.. about 1 inch above and 1 inch in front of the ankle bone... i had it in the past which started at 6 months after running 5 miles everyday. Ive been ok the past 3 weeks, until last night... my shin started hurting and I had to stop running and instead use the bike. my reasearch indicates its either overtraining.. or bad form.. my guess is its the latter as it takes time to develope.. comments??
What to expect: Most Krav Maga programs thrive on intense workouts with lots of drills. Fighting when your tired is a key skill and most Krav Maga programs are extremely adept at getting you to that point. Also, some of the main techniques involve stuff that’s flat out banned in other arts. Kicks to the groin? Eye pokes? Throat rakes? Joint breaks? All part of the game. A big part.
Especially used by fighters with strong wrestling background when facing a highly skilled grappler, or by wrestlers who prefer stand-up fights. Usually fighters who adopt this strategy use takedowns only for scoring, allowing the adversary to stand up and continue the fight. They also want to land clear strikes and control the octagon. In order to win the fight by decision all score oriented fighters have to have strong defensive techniques and avoid takedowns.[139]
In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
Starting in the boxing stance, squat slightly and twist your body to the left while pivoting your right foot. As you turn, bring your right arm and fist up, toward your target. Then pull your elbow back and reassume the boxing stance. Next, throw a left uppercut: Keeping your knees slightly bent, pivot to the left with your right foot while twisting your body to the left. Then, keeping your weight forward, twist back to the right toward your target while bringing your left arm and fist up. Repeat the movements, alternating between them, for 30 seconds.

Team Quest MMA & Fitness Portland is a world leader in mixed martial arts training and we are experts in boxing classes & boxing training for all skill levels. No matter if you are a beginner or pro, our boxing program at Team Quest MMA will challenge you, help you lose weight, get in shape fast and learn realistic boxing with fast paced drills and awesome work out partners. 
According to the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts, an MMA competition or exhibition may be held in a ring or a fenced area. The fenced area can be round or have at least six sides. Cages vary: some replace the metal fencing with a net, others have a different shape from an octagon, as the term "the Octagon" is trademarked by the UFC (though the 8-sided shape itself is not trademarked).[93] The fenced area is called a cage generically, or a hexagon, an octagon or an octagon cage, depending on the shape.
For many years, professional MMA competitions were illegal in Canada. Section 83(2) of the Canadian Criminal Code deemed that only boxing matches where only fists are used are considered legal.[208][209] However most provinces regulated it by a provincial athletic commission (skirting S. 83(2) by classifying MMA as "mixed boxing"),[210] such as the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario,[211] Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Northwest Territories. The legality of MMA in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and New Brunswick varies depending on the municipality.[212][213] Professional MMA competitions remain illegal in the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Yukon, and Nunavut because it is not regulated by an athletic commission.
“The quality of training, the hours, the flexibility to attend other classes and sessions are all GREAT! I’ve only been a member for a short time, but I have found all of the instructors to be deserving of recognition.  They have all shown tremendous patience with me personally and have taken the time to work with me to improve. I originally joined the Cove as a way of providing some conditioning to my workouts.  I’m happy to say that I received that and so much more.  Under Mr. Arnebeck’s direction and dedication the Cove has been an incredible experience.  My conditioning has improved, I’ve lost over 20lbs, and I’ve taken my self defense skills to a whole new level.  The Warrior’s Cove provides everything you’re looking for.”
What to expect: Most Krav Maga programs thrive on intense workouts with lots of drills. Fighting when your tired is a key skill and most Krav Maga programs are extremely adept at getting you to that point. Also, some of the main techniques involve stuff that’s flat out banned in other arts. Kicks to the groin? Eye pokes? Throat rakes? Joint breaks? All part of the game. A big part.
Unable to fight or train intensely for several years, Alice turned to food for comfort. "I'm an emotional eater, so I would drive down the road, stop at Sonic, and grab a double cheeseburger," she says. "I just ate a lot." Her busy schedule, packed with work, travel, and her kids' activities, made getting back into a healthy lifestyle seem all the more daunting. "I like healthy food, but because of the way my schedule was—with my husband working nights and me off work late and caring for the kids—I needed fast and easy," she remarks. "We ate a lot of fast food. I didn't have the time to prep."
The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”
In March 1997, the Iowa Athletic Commission officially sanctioned Battlecade Extreme Fighting under a modified form of its existing rules for Shootfighting. These rules created the three 5 minute round, one-minute break format, and mandated shootfighting gloves, as well as weight classes, for the first time. Illegal blows were listed as groin strikes, head butting, biting, eye gouging, hair pulling, striking an opponent with an elbow while the opponent is on the mat, kidney strikes, and striking the back of the head with closed fist. Holding onto the ring or cage for any reason was defined as a foul.[50][51] While there are minor differences between these and the final Unified Rules, notably regarding elbow strikes, the Iowa rules allowed mixed martial arts promoters to conduct essentially modern events legally, anywhere in the state. On March 28, 1997, Extreme Fighting 4 was held under these rules, making it the first show conducted under a version of the modern rules.
The more you know about the dynamics and characteristics of street fighting, the greater you chances surviving and ultimately winning the fight. There is an old saying in my self defense school, "the more you know, the less you will fear in the streets". To help get you started on your academic journey, here are some important facts about the nature and characteristics of street fighting.

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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