To determine your overtraining status and your improving fitness, take your heart rate every morning. I strongly recommend a heart rate monitor, but if you do not have one, take your heart rate at your wrist, not your neck. Remember you need a clock or timer that measures seconds. Take the heart rate for a full minute every morning after you get up and go to the bathroom, but before you do anything else. Make sure you are sitting. Record the number every day, and if it is increases by more than five beats per minute you are probably overtraining or getting sick.
3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.
WARNING: There are no pills or potions and this will take some hard work, so if you’re looking for a magic-fix then you’ve landed on the wrong site. But if you’re looking for a solution to your strength and conditioning needs that’s not only based on science and theory but also tested in the Octagon, then the info you’re about to read may be the most important info you ever read.

Capoeira has been incorporated into MMA in more recent years and is often used as an addition to Brazilian jiu-jitsu; both originate from Brazil. Several fighters use this martial art when fighting, although not fully, as music and dancing are major components of the discipline. Conor McGregor incorporated some techniques and has in turn helped Capoeira gain more attention in MMA. It is known for its quick and complex manoeuvres, which use power, speed, and leverage across a wide variety of kicks, spins and techniques.


In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
2) Way Down Way Back-Feet spread more than shoulder width apart, torso erect, arms at shoulder height to the sides, elbows bent at right angle with fists pointed up. Bring fists to stomach striking stomach and then immediately bend forward at the waist and lightly striking fists to floor, as you arise, again strike fists to stomach and then return to starting position. This is a ballistic exercise done quickly with intensity and is designed to warm up the shoulders, torso, and stretch the lower body.
Place both hands on the ground and jump back into a sprawl or burpee position. When working with my MMA athletes, I cue them to get their hips down quickly and low to the ground. For the general fitness enthusiast, jumping back into a push-up position is another great option. Reverse this movement and as you come up, perform a jump straight up into the air, using your arms to assist in the movement. Immediately drop back down and repeat for the desired number of repetitions.
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
After every workout you should always have a cool down period. This could mean a light jog or walk around the block or maybe a light bicycle session. One of the most important things for fighters is their flexible,  it’s important to never forget a stretching routine after a workout. Stretching is great for muscular growth as well as allowing your body to move in positions that can be strategically better for fighters. Stretching allows advanced fighters to get their kicks higher and allows them to practice more advanced kicks (such as spinning hooks kicks, tornado kicks, etc).

Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.

John Lewis – Lewis is an iconic name in Civil Rights in America. Lewis was a key participant in the Civil Rights movement; he is one of the original Freedom Riders, was one of the “Big Six” Civil Rights leaders, helped organize the March on Washington with Martin Luther King Jr., and was integral to ending segregation in America. Currently, he is the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 5th Congressional District.


Blocking - your various defensive tools designed to intercept your assailant's oncoming blow during the street fight. Avoid reflexive blinking when a punch or kick is thrown at you during a real street fight. A split-second blink could leave you vulnerable to the opponent's blow. Blinking is a natural reflex. As a matter of fact, the eye blinks every two to ten seconds. However, reflexive eye blinking during a physical attack can be eliminated with proper self-defense training. For example, during sparring and full-contact simulated street fighting sessions, you must make a conscious effort to keep your head forward and your eyes open amid flying blows. This skill, of course, will take time and above all - courage.
how long? well ive got about 50 classes under my belt. of that about 40 was pure positional training only; not grappling but holding/passing positions for 2 min rounds eg start in mount/guard/side/knee/bottom and the goal is to maintain and/or submit or if you are on the bottom, reverse and do that as many times within round. its a begginer class pre-req for the advanced program. so with that in mind my technique is far superior than my gas.

Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.

Hey Clover, get a weapon and learn how to use it. Pepper spray and a gun are good options to keep people away from you. Avoid people that are abusive. At 5 feet and 95 pounds you aren’t going to be winning a lot of physical fights. I know a girl who is a Judo champion and weighed 110, and guys with zero training could make her tap out. Because most had like 30-70 pounds of muscle on her.
Almost everyone is familiar with plyometrics and the entire paradigm of plyometric training was designed largely developed to serve this exact purpose. Reactive power intervals are an effective blend of plyometrics and intervals and while most interval methods fall short in improving explosiveness because they are often performed in a constant state of fatigue, reactive power intervals take a unique approach and produce far better results.
The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find. 
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